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Dialogi tres in Lactentium

Critical Latin Edition, English Translation, Introduction, and Notes
Antonio da Rho’s Three Dialogues against Lactantius (1445) followed the lead of Jerome and Augustine yet went well beyond patristic concerns. During the Middle Ages Lactantius’ works, while largely neglected, had enjoyed moments of intense interest and study. From the death of Lactantius (325) to his broad Quattrocento recovery, many profound cultural and intellectual shifts had transpired. Consequently, Rho’s dialogues engage topics arising from scholastic and other debates in jurisprudence, cosmology, astrology, geography, philosophy, and theology. He was convinced that insights from these fields would elucidate errors of Lactantius that his readers had overlooked. This reveals much about the cultural and intellectual developments that shaped readers’ efforts to recover, comprehend, and define Lactantius as an author. Significantly, the list of Lactantius’ errors discussed in the dialogues was printed with nearly every edition of Lactantius through the sixteenth century and beyond.
Editor:
J. L. Moles (1949–2015) made fundamental contributions to the fields of ancient (especially Cynic) philosophy, Greek and Roman historiography and biography, Latin poetry, and New Testament studies. These two volumes gather together all of his major articles and reviews, along with six previously unpublished papers. The papers display Moles’ individual and sometimes iconoclastic approach, his impressive range in both Classical and New Testament texts, and his unrivalled abilities in close reading. This is volume 1.
Editor:
J. L. Moles (1949–2015) made fundamental contributions to the fields of ancient (especially Cynic) philosophy, Greek and Roman historiography and biography, Latin poetry, and New Testament studies. These two volumes gather together all of his major articles and reviews, along with six previously unpublished papers. The papers display Moles’ individual and sometimes iconoclastic approach, his impressive range in both Classical and New Testament texts, and his unrivalled abilities in close reading. This is volume 2.
A Critical Edition and Translation of Evagrius Ponticus’ Kephalaia Gnostika in Arabic
In the late fourth century, the early Christian monk and author Evagrius Ponticus wrote his magnum opus in Greek—entitled Kephalaia Gnostika (“Gnostic Chapters”)—a spiritual treatise on ascetic contemplation and unity with God. After Evagrius’ death, however, his theology attracted controversy, and many of his writings were suppressed or destroyed. As a result, complete copies of this important work principally survived only in Syriac translations and an Armenian adaptation, until the recent discovery of two Arabic copies at the so-called Monastery of the Syrians in Egypt. The present volume represents the first-ever critical edition and translation of the Kephalaia Gnostika in that language.
Aḥob of Qatar and the Development of the East Syriac Exegetical Tradition
Author:
In The Heirs of Theodore Seth M. Stadel examines Aḥob of Qatar, a late 6th-century East Syriac biblical commentator, and his surviving Old Testament exegetical works. He further investigates what can be deduced of Aḥob’s influence on the later East Syriac exegetical tradition, and he details the originality of Aḥob’s exegesis, especially in comparison with earlier and contemporary Greek and Syriac sources. By presenting the first annotated edition, English translation, and study of Aḥob’s extant Old Testament exegetical works, Stadel is able to show that Aḥob represents a distinct voice within the East Syriac exegetical tradition.
From the Books of Maccabees to the Babylonian Talmud
This volume offers a comprehensive discussion of all relevant sources concerning Jewish martyrdom in Antiquity. By viewing these narratives together, tracing their development and comparing them to other traditions, the authors seek to explore how Jewish is Jewish martyrdom? To this end, they analyse the impact of the changing social and religious-cultural circumstances and the interactions with Graeco-Roman and Christian traditions. This results in the identification of important continuities and discontinuities. Consequently, while political ideals that are prominent in 2 and 4 Maccabees are remarkably absent from rabbinic sources, the latter reveal a growing awareness of Christian motifs and discourse.
New Light on Acts 2-8 and the Link Between Spiritual and Economic Transformation
Traditional exegesis divides scripture into two distinct economic models: the OT (Hebrew) model of blessing with a “surplus of prosperity”, and the NT (Christian) model of economic collectivism with “all things in common”. Using an economic perspective as an exegetical tool, the author demonstrates that this differentiation is an artificial construct. In particular, he argues that various NT Greek words and phrases in Acts, which have been rendered to describe acts of charity, should be reinterpreted to depict overtly commercial activities, including the possibility of a banking operation at the heart of the primitive church that posed a serious political and economic threat to the Jewish elite in first-century Jerusalem.
Case Studies on Archaeology, Texts, Online Publishing, Digital Archiving, and Preservation
The new volume of the CyberResearch series brings together thirty-three authors under the umbrella of digital methods in Archaeology, Ancient Near Eastern Studies and Biblical studies.
Both a newbie and a professional reader will find here diverse research topics, accompanied by detailed presentations of digital methods: distant reading of text corpora, GIS digital imaging, and various methods of text analyses. The volume is divided into three parts under the headings of archaeology, texts and online publishing, and includes a wide range of approaches from the philosophical to the practical.
This volume brings the reader up-to-date research in the field of digital Ancient Near Eastern studies, and highlights emerging methods and practices. While not a textbook per se, the book is excellent for teaching and exploring the Digital Humanities.
Authoritative, and Fully Annotated, based on the best Syriac Text
The Bible of Edessa is an authoritative translation of the Peshitta, the Syriac version of the Hebrew Bible. Syriac was the form of Aramaic used in the city of Edessa in upper Mesopotamia the birthplace of the Peshitta.
The Bible of Edessa is based on the oldest and best Syriac manuscripts, as published in the Leiden–Amsterdam Peshitta edition. The translation are also furnished with an introduction and extensive annotations. The Bible of Edessa is authorized by the International Organization for the Study of the Old Testament (IOSOT) and published by the Amsterdam Peshitta Institute under supervision of an international editorial board.
Author:
Authoritative, Based on the Best Syriac Text, and Fully Annotated The Bible of Edessa is an authoritative translation of the Peshitta, the Syriac version of the Hebrew Bible. It is named after the city of Edessa in upper Mesopotamia, the birthplace of the Peshitta and home to the form of Aramaic now called Syriac.
The Bible of Edessa is based on the oldest and best Syriac manuscripts, as made available in the Leiden–Amsterdam Peshitta edition. Its volumes also come with an introduction and extensive annotations. The Bible of Edessa is authorized by the International Organization for the Study of the Old Testament (IOSOT) and published by the Amsterdam Peshitta Institute under supervision of an international editorial board.