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Author: Michael Lecker
Translator: Yaara Perlman
The History, Theology, and Liturgy of the Eucharist in the Anglican Church of Australia
Author: Brian Douglas
In The Anglican Eucharist in Australia, Brian Douglas explores the History, Theology, and Liturgy of the Eucharist in the Anglican Church of Australia. The story begins with the first white settlement in 1788 and continues to the present day. The three eucharistic liturgies used in the ACA, and the debates that led to them, are examined in depth: The Book of Common Prayer (1662); An Australian Prayer Book (1978); and A Prayer Book for Australia (1995). The deep sacramentality of the Aboriginal people is acknowledged and modern issues such as liturgical development, lay presidency and virtual Eucharists are also explored. The book concludes with some suggestions for the further development of eucharistic liturgies within the ACA.
Arabs and Arabists contains nineteen selected articles by Alastair Hamilton on the Western acquisition of knowledge of the Arab and Ottoman world in the early modern period. The first essays are on Arabs who visited Europe and gave instruction to Western Arabists, and on Europeans who either visited the Arab (or the Ottoman) world in search of manuscripts and information or who, like Franciscus Raphelengius, Isaac Casaubon and Adriaen Reland, studied it at a distance and remained in the West. These are followed by a section on the actual study of the Arabic language in Europe, and above all the creation of the first Arabic-Latin dictionaries, and another on the European study of Islam and Western translations of the Qur’an.
Catholic Debates at the Time of Trent.
With an Edition and Translation of Key Documents.
Author: Wietse de Boer
The Catholic Church answered Reformation-era contestations of the cult of images in a famous decree of the Council of Trent (1563). Art in Dispute revisits this response by focusing on its antecedents rather than its consequences. The mid-sixteenth century saw, besides new scholarship on Byzantine doctrines, heated debates about neo-scholastic interpretations. Disagreement, suppressed at Trent but re-emerging soon afterwards, centered on the question whether religious images were solely signs referring to holy subjects or also sacred objects in their own right. It was a debate with major implications for art theory and devotional practice.

The volume contains editions and translations of texts by Martín Pérez de Ayala, Matthieu Ory, Jean Calvin, Ambrogio Catarino Politi, and Iacopo Nacchianti, along with a previously unknown draft of the Tridentine decree.
This book brings together the disciplines of history and psychology. It is the first study to apply attachment theory to self-narratives of the past, namely examples of life-writing (letters and proto-autobiographies) from medieval England, written in broad religious contexts. It examines whether God could appear as an adequate attachment figure in times of high mortality and often inadequate childrearing practices, and whether the emphasis on God’s proximity to believers benefited their psychological reorganisation. The main method of enquiry is discourse analysis based on the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) coding.
Is China truly a secular state? André Laliberté puts this widely held perception to the test, arguing that we must first broaden our definitions if we are to comprehend fully the religious nature of the Chinese state. From there, Laliberté presents the long tradition of Chinese statecraft, which has involved different forms of intermingling between religion and state, and describes how the Communist Party perpetuates this institutional intertwinement despite its materialist philosophy. He then explores the variety of forms in which societies with a Chinese heritage outside of the People’s Republic of China are moving beyond this mutual entanglement between religion and state.
Contributor: Angela Ellis
A Companion to Catholicism and Recusancy in Britain and Ireland is an edited collection of nineteen essays written by a range of experts and some newer scholars in the areas of early modern British and Irish history and religion. In addition to English Catholicism, developments in Ireland, Scotland, and Wales, as well as ongoing connections and interactions with Continental Catholicism, are well incorporated throughout the volume. Many currents of the latest scholarship are addressed and advanced, including religious minorities and exiles, women and gender studies, literary and material culture, religious identity construction, and, within Catholic studies, the role of laity as well as clergy, and of female as well as male religious. In all, these essays significantly advance the movement of early modern British and Irish Catholicism from the historiographical margins to an evolving, but ultimately more capacious and accurate, historical mainstream.
Editor: Ian Hazlett
This book presents customized chapters by 28 authors on the Scottish Reformation from the late 1520s to 1638. The book has broad thematic frameworks into which the specific chapters fit. There are 10 such major themes, namely: external and internal pressures for change; breakthrough and revolution; theological and philosophical formulations; varieties of dissemination; humanism and higher education; legal systems and moral order; appropriations in literary and popular cultures; outsiders; evolution of new national identity; historiographical traditions and prospective developments. While there are introductory elements, the chapters both recall previous studies and offer new research. Concerns of the book are to recall Reformation core religious dimensions and to highlight Scottish contribution to the rich tapestry of the Reformation in Europe.

Contributors include: Alexander Broadie, Flynn Cratty, Jane E.A. Dawson, Timothy Duguid, Elizabeth Ewan, Paul R. Goatman, Michael F. Graham, Thomas Green, Crawford Gribben, W. Ian P. Hazlett, Ernest R. Holloway III, John McCallum, Alan R. MacDonald, Alasdair A. MacDonald, Jamie McDougall, David Manning, David G. Mullan, Gordon D. Raeburn, Andrew Spicer, Bryan D. Spinks, Scott R. Spurlock, Laura A.M. Stewart, Mark S. Sweetnam, Kristen Post Walton, David G. Whitla, Jack C. Whytock, Arthur H. Williamson.
Volume Editor: Eleni Pachoumi