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This book introduces sociolinguistic criticism to New Testament studies. The individual essays cover a wide range of sociolinguistic theories (multilingualism, speech communities and individuals, language and social domains, diglossia, digraphia, codeswitching, language maintenance and shift, communication accommodation theory, social identity theory, linguistic politeness theory, discourse analysis, conversation analysis, register analysis, interactional sociolinguistics, ethnography of communication, etc.) that treat topics and issues pertaining to the language and sociolinguistic contexts of the New Testament, social memory, orality and literacy, and the oral traditions of the Gospels, and various texts and genres in the New Testament.
A Golah Polemic against the Autochthonous Inhabitants of the Land?
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Of all the tribes of Israel, why is Benjamin cast in the role of the villainous “other” in Judges 19-21? Krisel argues that the anti-Benjamin Tendenz in the narrative reflects economic, political and ideological tensions between the Golah community, the deportees who returned from Babylon during the early Persian period, and the people who had not gone into exile, who lived primarily in the Benjamin region. The hypothesis is supported by archaeological and survey data largely overlooked by biblical scholars and by a careful redaction history of the text. Krisel engages critically with the predominant scholarly view that Judges 19-21 uses “irony” to cast the explicit heroes in the narrative, the sons of Israel, as the implicit villains.
In: Judges 19-21 and the “Othering” of Benjamin
In: Judges 19-21 and the “Othering” of Benjamin
In: Judges 19-21 and the “Othering” of Benjamin
In: Judges 19-21 and the “Othering” of Benjamin
In: Judges 19-21 and the “Othering” of Benjamin
In: Judges 19-21 and the “Othering” of Benjamin