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A Textual Reconstruction of Chapters 1–7
The first half of the book of Daniel contains world-famous stories like the Writing on the Wall. These stories have mostly been transmitted in Aramaic, not Hebrew, as has the influential apocalypse of Daniel 7. This Aramaic corpus shows clear signs of multiple authorship. Which different textual layers can we tease apart, and what do they tell us about the changing function of the Danielic material during the Second Temple Period? This monograph compares the Masoretic Text of Daniel to ancient manuscripts and translations preserving textual variants. By highlighting tensions in the reconstructed archetype underlying all these texts, it then probes the tales’ prehistory even further, showing how Daniel underwent many transformations to yield the book we know today.
Anchoring Cultural Formation in the First Millennium BCE
Canonisation is fundamental to the sustainability of cultures. This volume is meant as a (theoretical) exploration of the process, taking Eurasian societies from roughly the first millennium BCE (Babylonian, Assyrian, Persian, Greek, Egyptian, Jewish and Roman) as case studies. It focuses on canonisation as a form of cultural formation, asking why and how canonisation works in this particular way and explaining the importance of the first millennium BCE for these question and vice versa. As a result of this focus, notions like anchoring, cultural memory, embedding and innovation play an important role throughout the book.
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Abstract

This paper concerns the rendering of Hebrew “terebinth” as “valley,” and the mention of a “valley” near Hebron in a plus. In the Targums, the Vulgate and Aquila the “terebinths” of Moreh and Mamre (Gen 12:6; 18:1; Deut 11:30) are represented by a term meaning “valley.” According to the standard analysis this rendering avoids the association of these precincts with non-monotheistic cults. However, this theory fails to explain the use of the term “valley.” Midrashic comments point to anti-Samaritan polemics, based on Deut 11:30, where “terebinth” and “plain,” Arabah, meet. Furthermore, a plus of the Septuagint and the Samaritan mentions “the valley of Hebron” (Gen 23:2; cf. the gloss, 37:14). These constellations are related to a particular sensitivity for the status of the Mamre region in the Persian era and beyond as it belongs to Idumaea, and its religious practice includes non-monotheistic cults.

In: Textus
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In: Textus
Free access
In: Textus
In: Aramaic Daniel
In: Aramaic Daniel
In: Aramaic Daniel
In: Aramaic Daniel
In: Aramaic Daniel