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Abstract

Melito’s presupposition that Israel should have been able to recognize the Christ has drawn him much criticism. This essay explores the identity of Melito’s Israel and the rhetorical trope that Melito employs: censure of Israel. Melito’s understanding of the continuity between the “old” and “new” remains underexplored in the significance of its claim. Melito has a profound insight in his interpretative key for the relationship of the old covenant with respect to the new, namely that God made prior arrangements (προοικονοµία) for Christ’s sufferings in the Old Testament. Finally, the essay will examine Melito’s οἰκονοµία. In short, the προοικονοµία provides an early Christian account to describe the manner in which the mysteries of the life of Christ (οἰκονοµία) could be hidden beforehand (προ-) by God in the life and history of the people of Israel and made manifest in the Easter celebration. Melito therefore develops a truly mystagogical exegesis.

In: Scrinium
In: Vigiliae Christianae
Author:

Abstract

Very little is known about the use of Scripture by Bardaisan, the Syriac-speaking Christian philosopher. The scholars have identified a few biblical references and terms, but they found that quotations are extremely rare. Even more so, it is difficult to state an opinion on Bardaisan’s exegetical method. Research has focused on Ephraim’s Memrā against Bardaisan and his passages concerning the reading of Jn 8:51. Now, it is possible to broaden the area of research on the testimony of Eusebius of Emesa – preserved in Armenian – about Bardaisanite exegesis of Gen 6:22 and Gen 7:1, as well as on the uses the Scriptures by Bardaisanite who intervenes in Adamantios’s Dialogue on Right Faith in God. The analysis of this new evidences shows that Bardaisan and his followers practised literal exegesis in the tradition of the Antiochian school.

Il existe très peu d’informations sur l’utilisation des Écritures par Bardesane, le philosophe chrétien de langue syriaque. Les spécialistes ont identifié surtout des allusions et expressions bibliques, mais les citations restent extrêmement rares. À plus forte raison, il est difficile de se prononcer sur la méthode exégétique de Bardesane. Les recherches ont été concentrées sur le Memrā contre Bardesane d’Éphrem et ses passages concernant la lecture de Jn 8, 51. Cependant, il est possible d’élargir le champ de recherche sur le témoignage d’Eusèbe d’Émèse – conservé en arménien – au sujet de l’exégèse bardesanite de Gn 6, 22 et Gn 7, 1, ainsi que sur la manière d’utilisation des Écritures par le bardesanite qui in-tervient dans le Dialogue sur la juste foi en Dieu d’Adamantios. L’analyse de ce nouveau dossier montre que Bardesane et ses disciples ont pratiqué l’exégèse littérale, dans la tradition de l’école d’Antioche.

In: Vigiliae Christianae

Abstract

A bilingual Greek-Coptic manuscript (P.Mon.Epiph. 49+592) found at the monastic settlement of Epiphanius in Western Thebes contains a litany recounting the principal events in the saving work of Christ. The litany has been overlooked in scholarship on the manuscript and on comparable litanies from antiquity. It differs from other litanies in attributing all the statements to God rather than to Christ. The article argues that the litany was an expression of miaphysite affiliation and belief. The article contextualizes the litany in the robust miaphysite culture of Thebes in the early seventh century and in the Greek-Coptic bilingualism of the time, and it discusses possible uses of the litany in collective worship, monastic prayer, and other rituals.

In: Vigiliae Christianae
Classical Perspectives on Ascent in the Journey to God
Volume Editors: and
How does one grow holy in such times? This question drove the early Christian imagination no less than it does today. Patristic Spirituality: Classical Perspectives on Ascent to the Divine features numerous studies offering an “itinerary” for early Christian believers wishing to enter into the divine presence. Readers will discover an array of perennial early Christian wisdom into the practical challenges of ascent, “a work of God in Christ, transforming and incorporating us,” says Lewis Ayres. See how early Christians cultivated the life of grace with hospitality, silence, almsgiving, and other ascetic practices for human elevation into mystical union with God.

Contributors are: Benjamin D. Wayman, John S. Bergsma and Luke Iyengar, Hans Boersma, Stanley E. Porter, Gregory Vall Don W. Springer, Bogdan G. Bucur, Amy Brown Hughes, Sean Argondizza-Moberg, Stephen M. Hildebrand, Brian Matz, Anna Silvas, Ann Conway-Jones, Sandy L. Haney, Despina D. Prassas, Gerald Boersma, Brian E. Daley, Andrew Louth, Jonathan L. Zecher, Kevin M. Clarke, Lewis Ayres.

Abstract

Victorinus of Pettau is often read either as one of many binitarian Latin theologians in the ante-Nicene era or as a simple exegete whose imprecise comments on the relationship between the Word and Spirit are characteristic of his time. This study argues that recent research on “angelomorphic” theology in sources like Revelation and Clement of Alexandria and the reinterpretation of those traditions in Origen offers a new context in which to situate Victorinus. Read in this context, Victorinus’ comments on the Spirit of sevenfold power and the Word imply a more sophisticated and coherent understanding of the Holy Spirit and the Spirit’s relationship with the Word than is usually thought.

In: Vigiliae Christianae
Editors-in-Chief: and
Critical Approaches to Early Christianity publishes monographs and volumes of collected essays by scholars that exemplify the application of theories and approaches that are novel, interdisciplinary, or that disrupt or expand traditional ways of viewing the literature and thought of the early Christian world and its settings.
The series comprises volumes of ancient texts with translations and commentaries, individual monographs, thematic collections, as well as translations into English of noteworthy volumes in modern languages. It covers the Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and Eastern Catholic traditions from the early through to the contemporary period. The series will make a valuable contribution to the field of Eastern Christian Studies by publishing research by scholars from a variety of disciplines and traditions.

The series published an average of 1,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.