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Which were the mechanisms by which certain groups were positioned at the margins of national narratives during the nineteenth century, either via their exclusion from these narratives of through their incorporation into them as ‘others’? By engaging with shifting ideas of exclusion and difference, the authors in this book reflect upon the paradoxical centrality of the subaltern at a time when literature was deployed as a tool for nation building. The lasting presence of the Jewish and Moorish legacy, the portrayal of gypsy characters, or the changing notions of femininity in public discourse exemplify the ways in which images of marginal ‘types’ played a central role in the configuration of the very idea of Spanishness.

¿Cuáles fueron los mecanismos mediante los que ciertos grupos fueron relegados a los márgenes del relato nacional durante el siglo XIX, bien a través de su exclusión de dichos relatos, bien a través de su incorporación a ellos como "otros"? A través del análisis de las ideas de exclusión y diferencia, los autores de este libro reflexionan sobre la paradójica centralidad de lo marginal en una época en la que la literatura fue una herramienta fundamental para la construcción de la nación. La pervivencia del legado judío y morisco, la representación de personajes gitanos o las distintas nociones de feminidad presentes en el discurso público ejemplifican las formas en que las imágenes de "tipos" marginales desempeñaron un papel central en la configuración de la idea de españolidad.
Poetry in Poland and China Since 1989
Author:
In Search of Singularity introduces a new “compairative” methodology that seeks to understand how the interplay of paired texts creates meaning in new, transcultural contexts. Bringing the worlds of contemporary Polish and Chinese poetry since 1989 into conversation with one another, Joanna Krenz applies the concept of singularity to draw out resonances and intersections between these two discourses and shows how they have responded to intertwined historical and political trajectories and a new reality beyond the human. Drawing on developments such as AI poetry and ecopoetry, Krenz makes the case for a fresh approach to comparative poetry studies that takes into account new forms of poetic expression and probes into alternative grammars of understanding.
This is the first complete study of the relationship between Retranslation and Reception. Although many translation scholars have cited Reception Theory in their work, this is the first systematic study of its relationship to Retranslation. The book starts from the hypothesis that frequent retranslations of the same literary text into the same language may be indicative of its impact in the target culture. The volume encompasses both theory and practical analysis of Retranslation and Reception as mutually dependent concepts. The sixteen chapters relate the translations analysed to their socio-historical contexts in order to assess the impact that they have had on the target culture in terms of the reception of the authors studied, and also explore the relationship that may exist between the appearance of new translations and historical, social or cultural changes.
During the 13th and 14th centuries, medieval Castile produced some of the liveliest, most sophisticated vernacular reworkings of narratives inherited from classical and late antiquity, including those about Alexander the Great, the Trojan War, or Apollonius of Tyre. This study recovers the overlooked tradition of the Castilian romances of antiquity, showing how these works offered a nuanced reflection of the relationship between cultural memory, the media through which memory is shaped and transmitted, and Castile’s imperial ambitions. Clara Pascual-Argente restores a genre of great cultural and political importance to its rightful place in Castilian and European literary history.
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During much of China’s tumultuous 20th century, May 4th and Maoist iconoclasts regarded their classical literary heritage as a burden to be dislodged in the quest for modernization. This volume demonstrates how the traditions that had deeply impressed earlier generations of Western writers like Goethe and Voltaire did not lose their lustre; to the contrary, a fascination with these past riches sprouted with renewed vigour among Euro-American poets, novelists, and other cultural figures after the fall of imperial China in 1911. From Petrograd to Paris, and from São Paolo to San Francisco, China’s premodern poetry, theatre, essays, and fiction inspired numerous prominent writers and intellectuals. The contributors survey the fruits of this engagement in multiple Western languages and nations.
Author:
If, as Robert Craft remarked, ‘religious beliefs were at the core of Stravinsky’s life and work’, why have they not figured more prominently in discussions of his works?
Stravinsky’s coordination of the listener with time is central to the unity of his compositional style. This ground-breaking study looks at his background in Russian Orthodoxy, at less well-known writings of Arthur Lourié and Pierre Souvtchinsky and at the Catholic philosophy of Jacques Maritain, that shed light on the crucial link between Stravinsky’s spirituality and his restoration of time in music.
Recent neuroscience research supports Stravinsky’s eventual adoption of serialism as the natural and logical outcome of his spiritual and musical quest.