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This volume explores the work of Anselm of Canterbury, theologian and archbishop, in light of the communities in which he participated. Featuring thirteen essays from leading historians, theologians, and literary scholars, the collection ranges from Anselm’s immediate contemporaries to the reception of his work, and formation of his posthumous reputation, by later medieval readers.

Individual essays consider the role of friendships in his career, his relations with students, correspondence with women, interventions in the political sphere, and influence as leader of the monastic communities at Bec and Canterbury. Together, these essays present a new profile of the archbishop, revealing an individual whose work emerged from a vibrant culture of debate, criticism, and collaboration.

Contributors are: Giles E. M. Gasper, Bernard van Vreeswijk, David Whidden, Hiroko Yamazaki, Bernd Goebel, Thomas Barrows, Hollie Devanney, Stephanie Britton, Sally Vaughn, George Younge, Christian Brouwer, Daniel Coman, Margaret Healy-Varley, and Severin Kitanov.
This volume, the 36th year of published proceedings, contains five papers and four commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during the academic year 2019–20. Paper topics: On Platonism, how Plato’s Cave preserves his political interest from Arendt’s critique, and how Plutarch’s Isis and Osiris uses a complex framing device to integrate Platonic metaphysics and politics. On Aristotle, that dialectic is a versatile techne for formal and informal discussion, and the role of practice to preserve the voluntary nature of character despite its grounding in upbringing. Finally, using Aristotle to argue for the legitimacy of anger against transhumanist efforts, echoing Stoic concerns against such emotions. The comments challenge or sustain the theses presented in the main papers.
Author: Zhaoyuan WAN
WAN Zhaoyuan analyses how Chinese intellectuals conceived of the relationship between ‘science’ and ‘religion’ through in-depth examination of the writings of Kang Youwei, a prominent political reformer and radical Confucian thinker, often referred to by his disciples as the ‘Martin Luther of Confucianism’.
Confronted with the rise of scientism and challenged by the Conflict Thesis during his life among adversarial Chinese New Culture intellectuals, Kang maintains a holistic yet evolving conception of a compatible and complementary relationship between scientific knowledge and ‘true religion’ exemplified by his Confucian religion ( kongjiao). This close analysis of Kang’s ideas contributes to a richer understanding of the history of science and religion in China and in a more global context.
The Law of Accumulation and Breakdown of the Capitalist System, Being also a Theory of Crises
Author: Henryk Grossman
Editor: Rick Kuhn
Translators: Jairus Banaji and Rick Kuhn
Long awaited, the first full translation of Henryk Grossman’s The Law of Accumulation and Breakdown of the Capitalist System, Being also a Theory of Crisis has been published in English. It was the most important, influential and yet most denounced of Grossman's works and recovers not only Marx’s primary explanation of capitalism’s economic crises and breakdown tendency but also his method in Capital.
Permitting and Forbidding Open Inquiry in 12-15th Century Europe and North Africa
Author: Yehuda Halper
Yehuda Halper examines Jewish depictions of Socrates and Socratic questioning of the divine among European and North African Jews of the 12th-15th centuries. Without direct access to Plato, their understanding of Socrates is indirect, based on legendary material, on fragmentary quotations from Plato, or on Aristotle. Out of these sources, Jewish authors of this period formed two distinct views of Socrates: one as a wise, ascetic, monotheist, and the other as a vocal skeptic. The latter view has its roots in Plato's Apology where Socrates describes his divine mandate to question all knowledge, including knowledge of the divine. After exploring how this and similar questions arise in the works of Judah Halevi and the Hebrew Averroes, Halper traces how such open-questioning of the divine arises in the works of Maimonides, Jacob Anatoli, Gersonides, and Abraham Bibago.
Cultural Politics between the Second and Third Internationals
The German Left and Aesthetic Politics examines the articulation of contending materialist aesthetic practices within the ideological fractures of the German Left between the Second and Third International. It is hinged on the major literary critical contributions of Franz Mehring, representative of the Second, and Karl Wittfogel and Georg Lukacs representing the Third. Both parties focussed on the bourgeois revolutionary cultural heritage and how it might provide examples for emulation. However, post the 1918 November Revolution a radical politically avant-garde challenged that tradition, and through figures like the Berlin Dadaists, Piscator’s proletarian theatre and later Brecht, with contributions from dissident Marxist intellectuals, like Karl Korsch and Fritz Sternberg, asked other questions and proposed other answers. Revisiting the contexts and contents of these exchanges allows one to understand the serious role allocated to the cultural in constructing the ‘third pillar of socialism’, its integrative dimension.
Volume Editor: John Makeham
This innovative volume demonstrates how and to what ends the writings of Xiong Shili, Ma Yifu, Tang Junyi and Mou Zongsan adopted and repurposed conceptual models derived from the Buddhist text Treatise on Awakening Mahāyāna Faith. It shows which of the philosophical positions defended by these New Confucian philosophers were developed and sustained through engagement with the critical challenges advanced by scholars who attacked the Treatise. It also examines the extent to which twentieth-century New Confucians were aware of their intellectual debt to the Treatise and explains how they reconciled this awareness with their Confucian identity.
Eine Archäologie der Gegenwartskunst
Author: Helmut Draxler
In der Moderne muss Kunst ebenso wahr wie gegenwärtig sein. Kein Werk und keine Praxis können sich ernsthaft als Kunst behaupten, ohne solchen Ansprüchen zu genügen. Doch wie konnten Wahrheit und Gegenwärtigkeit zu den entscheidenden, nicht-ästhetischen Kriterien von Kunst werden? Die hier vorgelegte Studie versucht diese Frage zu beantworten, indem sie hinter die dominanten Begründungsmythen von Moderne und Gegenwartskunst im Sinne von heroischen Überwindungsleistungen alles Alten im Namen eines Neuen blickt. Derart wird eine Tradition des Wahrheits- und des Gegenwartsbezugs von Kunst sichtbar, die tief in jener Geschichte verwurzelt ist, als die Malerei begann, um ihren Status als Kunst zu ringen. Die historischen Niederlande stellen zwischen dem 15. und dem 17. Jahrhundert den exemplarischen Schauplatz dieses Ringens dar. Durch den Verlust vorgegebener Wahrheiten und Funktionen entwickelte die Malerei im Spannungsfeld zwischen ökonomischen, politischen und religiösen Krisen besondere Strategien der Selbstbehauptung als Kunst. Anhand spekulativer Bildideen – dem Bild als Schwelle, dem antagonistischen, dem analytischen und dem synthetischen Bild – wird die Wirkmächtigkeit dieser Strategien im Sinne eines spezifischen Wahrheitseinsatzes nachvollzogen und so das Nachleben der Niederländischen Malerei als Gegenwartskunst erfasst.
Uses and Abuses of an American Icon
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Thoreau in an Age of Crisis reconsiders the relevance of 19th-century American naturalist, philosopher, and social reformer Henry David Thoreau to our troubled present. This new anthology collects the work of fourteen leading scholars from various disciplines. They consider Thoreau’s life and work in light of contemporary concerns regarding racism, climate change, environmental policy, and political strife. They review Thoreau’s trajectory as a scientist and literary artist, as well as his evolving attitudes toward Native American cultures. The essaysists also consider Thoreau’s acoustics, concepts of play, and impact on later writers. Most provocatively, they reveal a vulnerable and empathetic Thoreau, a far cry from the distanced and misanthropic critic often portrayed in popular culture.
The Feasibility of Ethical Constructivism
Author: Heather Salazar
In Creating a Shared Morality, Heather Salazar develops a consistent and plausible account of ethical constructivism that rivals the traditional metaethical theories of realism and subjectivism (without lapsing into subjectivism as do previous constructivist attempts). Salazar’s Enlightenism argues that all people have moral obligations and that if they reflect well, they will naturally come to care about others as extensions of themselves. Enlightenism resolves difficulties within constructivism, builds bridges between the two traditional Western views of metaethics and employs concepts from Eastern (Buddhist) philosophy. It embraces universal morality while elevating the importance of autonomy, diversity and connectedness. Constructivist enlightenment entails understanding the interdependence of people on others such that we are all co-responsible for the world in which we live.