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Abstract

In this short piece I am going to reflect on my reaction to a commercial video and advertisement campaign by my university in Tokyo, Japan. The campaign 帝京生のリアル [The daily life of Teikyo students] ran in April 2023 (www.teikyo-u.ac.jp/campus_for_life/photo_project). The following is a translation of the Japanese voiceover from the cm which includes the voice of a concerned parent, the voice of a high school student, who is unsure about which course, which university, and which career to pursue.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Rethinking Theory and Practice
Series Editor:
This series maps the emergent field of educational futures. It will commission books on the futures of education in relation to the question of globalisation and knowledge economy. It seeks authors who can demonstrate their understanding of discourses of the knowledge and learning economies. It aspires to build a consistent approach to educational futures in terms of traditional methods, including scenario planning and foresight, as well as imaginative narratives, and it will examine examples of futures research in education, pedagogical experiments, new utopian thinking, and educational policy futures with a strong accent on actual policies and examples.
Author:

Abstract

This article describes the relationships between cruelty, schooling and the possibilities that the school offers as a refuge in the face of the inexorable circumstances that seal the fates of a large part of the population living in conditions marked by intensifying inequalities. The work is based on a multiple design which included an audiovisual production workshop in 2022 and 2023 involving students and teachers from a high school in the Buenos Aires metropolitan region and the university. Through the biographical-narrative method, students have carried out in-depth interviews, collaborative work and activities shared in the same school with one of the teachers for over three years. Research results express how, as perceived by high school students and teachers, the school serves as a space that saves others and themselves, a place of support, as well as transmission and education, even amidst instances of cruelty in their daily experiences.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Series Editors: and
Moral Development and Citizenship Education is a book series that focuses on the cultural development of our young people and the pedagogical ideas and educational arrangements to support this development. It includes the social, political and religious domains, as well as cognitive, emotional and action oriented content. The concept of citizenship has extended from being a pure political judgment, to include the social and interpersonal dynamics of people.
Morality has become a multifaceted and highly diversified construct that now includes cultural, developmental, situational and professional aspects. Its theoretical modelling, practical applications and measurements have become central scientific tasks. Citizenship and moral development are connected with the identity constitution of the next generations. A caring and supporting learning environment can help them to participate in society.
Books in this series will be based on different scientific and ideological theories, research methodologies and practical perspectives. The series has an international scope; it will support manuscripts from different parts of the world and it includes authors and practices from various countries and cultures, as well as comparative studies. The series seeks to stimulate a dialogue between different points of view, research traditions and cultures. It contains multi-authored handbooks, focusing on specific issues, and monographs. We invite books that challenge the academic community, bring new perspectives into the community and broaden the horizon of the domain of moral development and citizenship education.

Abstract

As part of the international “Wash from the Start” omep (World Organization for Early Childhood Education) project, researchers shared time with children in three early childhood centre communities in the South Island of Aotearoa New Zealand – Te Wai Pounamu. The research explored young children’s engagement with local conditions of water through fieldwork annotations and photographic visual methods. The video article presented here is a photo essay that spans the researcher teams’ experiences in their encounters with the children and teachers they had the privilege to spend time with over a sunny week in Autumn 2022.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

Chinese can be considered as one of the more challenging languages to learn for many non-native learners. Its complicated visual script, the Chinese characters, demands that teachers be proficient in utilizing diverse visual pedagogical approaches, coupled with different digital visual tools, to enhance their teaching effectiveness. Adopting a descriptive qualitative analysis method, interview transcripts from fourteen cfl teachers were examined. There were five online teachers, four university teachers and five pre-service teachers. The findings revealed that: 1) all the teachers use various visual pedagogical approaches, such as pictures, videos, Chinese character digital image files, Chinese character studying applications, and websites, to enhance the effectiveness of Chinese character learning, as well as motivate and engage learners; 2) teachers choose different pedagogical approaches to help students visualise characters as a whole unit or as several separate radical components; 3) the use of Pinyin to input characters on digital devices has been widely taught in class; and 4) online teachers, and some pre-service teachers, have replaced traditional handwriting methods with digital character input methods, whereas university teachers have not made this shift. The ways in which these perspectives relate to the form of Chinese characters and developing teaching practices are discussed.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Author:

Abstract

School in postmedia society falls prey to “systemic stupidity” (), while the teacher-cum-coach heeds what is considered the new divine calling for education. In this framework, this video-article looks to elements from research that the author believes might serve as a roadmap for work with words and images in schools that lie beyond that stupidity. Through the audiovisual narratives of students in secondary schools located in a slum in the Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area, the author explores possible approaches to the question of the audiovisual narrative in school and how school is or, rather, can continue to be the repository of the hopes that critical thought harbors. More specifically, the author asks whether audiovisual narratives can contribute to more complex conceptions of the world that help us go beyond the binary logics and infantilization.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

The authors discuss findings from an educational research study carried out in a secondary school of the Buenos Aires Metropolitan Region based on creative research methods and on a collaborative audiovisual project. They inquire into the forms education takes in a postmedia society and they explore the possibilities of the school as time-space to reflect upon the world by means of experimenting with diverse languages and techniques. Here the authors analyze audiovisual materials produced by students and suggest three analytic categories—the scream, the testimony and the singular experience—which are related by an incident that took place in the students’ neighborhood, known as the “Carcova Massacre”. The authors hypothesize that when this event is narrated in the first person by the students—who witnessed the death of their two young neighbors—, the story reported by the media as a police incident becomes a minor story, making it a lived story.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Volume Editor:
Pedagogies of magic have their own cocooned metaphors waiting to hatch. In literature and the arts, magic ties its practitioners to systems of learning and methods of becoming. Enchanted Pedagogies, edited by Kari Adelaide Razdow, is a collection of essays by artists and writers who reflect on archetypes and tropes of enchantment, intertwining elements such as transformation, imagination, creativity, and empathy. These essays evoke shapeshifters, witches, ghosts, fools, fairies, hags, gnomes, selkies, and more, exploring multi-disciplinary artistic practices. Enchanted Pedagogies presents ways to expand, imagine, and circumvent modes of creativity and pedagogies through personal, theoretical, practice based, and hybrid explorations. The fantastic and poetic intertwine in a space of reflexive storytelling, renewing significant transformational elements of the arts and education. Contributors are: Jesse Bransford, Vanessa Chakour, Trinie Dalton, Lorenzo De Los Angeles, Thom Donovan, Laura Forsberg, Pam Grossman, Amy Hale, Elizabeth Insogna, Candice Ivy, Tiffany Jewell, Alessandro Keegan, Jac Lahav, Ruth Lingford, Maria Pinto, Kris N. Racaniello, Kari Adelaide Razdow, Alicia Smith, Janaka Stucky, Kay Turner, Meg Whiteford and Erin Yerby.
Volume Editors: and
This volume contributes to the advancement of comparative education in the world, more specifically in expanding understandings of the discourse of comparative education vis-à-vis educational transformation. Throughout the text, three critical elements that reflect comparative education as an open, inconclusive discourse come up: (1) There is sufficient pedagogical space for dissonance. It is always possible to compare one’s own authenticity with the epistemological position others hold dear and argue for. (2) The contributions in this book should not be read as absolute pieces of writing as that would undermine the flexible nature of education. It is important to point out that the opinions of the authors are temporary moments of attachment to persuasive claims. However, these claims are not cast in stone as new views continue to emerge from epistemological (re)positioning. (3) Our own reading of the book corroborates our interest in comparative education as a continuous discourse in the making. The contributions of scholars at the third symposium organized by WCCES provided a platform for them to pursue their knowledge interests. In addition, these interests have and will or ought never to be homogenous for that would be incommensurate with a defensible practice of comparative education.