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Abstract

In this research the authors explore ClasSimVR, a proof-of-concept immersive virtual reality (ivr) application. This software is designed to support pre-service teachers (psts) implementation of a School-Wide Positive Behaviour Interventions and Supports (swpbis) approach to challenging student behaviours. ClasSimVR offers users the opportunity to engage with immersive hypothetical scenarios, whereby virtual students display challenging behaviours. Users respond to these behaviours with a range of possible actions aligned with a swpbis approach. The authors draw on a research-through-design (rtd) methodology to explore the design process of ClasSimVR. The article investigates the implications of an expert evaluation (n=5) conducted as part of the design process of creating ClasSimVR. More broadly, this research contributes to the discourse surrounding the design and implementation of immersive learning environments in educational contexts.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Rethinking Theory and Practice
Series Editor:
This series maps the emergent field of educational futures. It will commission books on the futures of education in relation to the question of globalisation and knowledge economy. It seeks authors who can demonstrate their understanding of discourses of the knowledge and learning economies. It aspires to build a consistent approach to educational futures in terms of traditional methods, including scenario planning and foresight, as well as imaginative narratives, and it will examine examples of futures research in education, pedagogical experiments, new utopian thinking, and educational policy futures with a strong accent on actual policies and examples.
Series Editors: , , and
The ISATT conference series represents an effort to compile international research and practices on Teacher Education. It draws upon a variety of educational approaches, procedures, and teaching contexts where the field takes form. The aims and scope of the ISATT book series is to promote and bring together the best papers presented at the Biennial conferences of the association. The ISATT’s main goal is to increase insights into the identity, role, contexts and work of teachers, and the process of teaching.
Author:

Abstract

Visual methods have been emphasised as alternative and complementary to traditional data collection methods in research with children and as useful tools in presenting conceptual and analytical frameworks. In their capacity to evoke the non-rational and material aspects of life, visual methods are also particularly beneficial in exploring everyday, taken for granted, institutional food practices. This article describes the way in which two sets of visual methods, namely representations and researcher-created data, were utilised within a study on a changing food practice in a Norwegian kindergarten. The representation is of a conceptual model, featuring Hedegaard’s cultural-historical wholeness approach and Fullan’s change model, which is visually presented. With this visualized conceptualisation, the study realises the goal of understanding the societal, institutional and individual perspectives in the change process. The researcher-created data included visual materials and video observations, exemplifying the change outcomes in relation to children’s experiences and participation in the “new” meal situation as well as their liking of, acceptance and consumption of the new food. This article concludes that the visual methods adopted are helpful both in conceptualisation and in data collection and generate important insights about the change of food practices.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

In this article, the authors intra-act with conceptual toolkit to examine noncomplaint learning of a ropemaking activity at The Norwegian Fisheries Museum in Bergen. Barad’s concepts of intra-action and diffraction allow us to perceive the rope as noncompliantly diffracting into the two different SpaceTimes of the 19th and 21st centuries. The former SpaceTime is intra-actively constituted by historical ropemaking craftship and the museum staff, and the latter by the children’s approaching the ropemaking through toys and play. In the overlap of the entanglements of the two SpaceTimes, noncompliant and ‘new areas of curiosity’ (, p. 123) unfold and continue the rope’s diffraction into the city. By following the intra-active community of Ida and the rope, the authors map entanglements of more-than-human worldings and conclude with a call for more museal diffractions that can (intra-)activate the museum’s relational capacities in the ecology of the city.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

Through an ethnomethodological and dialogical encounter with Australian classrooms in the lived experience of two visual art (va) educators, the authors seek to learn how working between online and studio learning approaches shaped teacher perceptions of student learning during the outbreak of covid-19 in 2020 and 2021. The research has two phases. Phase 1 sees the two va educators create learning narratives. These narratives, reported in summary in the article, through both material and digital form became the baseline data. In Phase 2 these themes were reworked as conversational questions. These questions then became the stimulus for a critical reflective online video conversation between the two va educators. The resulting discussion around the borderlines looks beyond specific apps, platforms, or products that the teachers used, their successes and failures and examines the digital, non-digital, material, social relations and pedagogical realities and futures that may or may be possible in the context of the postdigital va secondary classroom. These educators have had little time to assess the shift from a strong and well researched studio-pedagogy to their virtual creative learning futures. The challenges of this shift are revealed through their personal experiences.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy