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Volume Editor: Jennifer Wasmuth
Der öffentliche Diskurs zeichnet sich gegenwärtig vielfach durch eine Verhärtung der Fronten und die mangelnde Bereitschaft aus, sich auf die Gegenposition einzulassen. Diese Tendenzen lassen sich auch im ökumenischen Kontext beobachten, und schnell ist hier wie dort der Fundamentalismus-Vorwurf zur Hand.
Was meint dieser Vorwurf genau? Gegen wen richtet er sich? Ist Fundamentalismus nur eine polemische Etikettierung von Positionen, die nicht der eigenen entsprechen? Oder lassen sich unter dem Begriff politische und religiöse Gruppierungen fassen, die eine klar erkennbare Agenda verfolgen? Diesen Fragen geht der vorliegende Sammelband nach, indem er in seinen Beiträgen auf die Begriffsgeschichte und die Bedeutung von „Fundamentalismus“ in verschiedenen geographischen, konfessionellen und religiösen Kontexten reflektiert.
In: Mission Studies

Abstract

When compared to its relative success in the Southern and Western parts of Nigeria, Seventh-Day Adventism (S.D.A.) had some difficulties in establishing its mission in the North from the 1930s onward. This paper argues that there were three reasons why S.D.A. missionaries found the North difficult. First, the S.D.A. joined the Christian missionary scene in Nigeria rather late. Second, due to colonial politics, which did not favor the proselytizing aims of Christian missionaries in the North, Adventist missionaries did not find it easy to immediately establish a mission. Third, the difficult beginnings in northern Nigeria can also be attributed to the relationship between S.D.A. missionaries and other mission bodies, which tended towards rivalry, as a result of the “spheres of influence” established by the colonial government.

Open Access
In: Mission Studies
In: Mission Studies
In: Mission Studies
Author: Nicoletta Gatti

Abstract

The worrisome growth of nationalism and ethnicism worldwide emphasizes the distance between state and nation, geographical borders, and the sense of a shared common project, which is at the heart of nation-building. The problem is not new, as the ancient writings of Israel testify. The question of what constitutes Israelite identity is central to post-exilic books, where exclusive-isolationistic and inclusive attitudes are clearly contraposed.

Against this background, the paper explores the relationship between identity construction and nation-building, through an intercultural reading of Isaiah 56–66. Furthermore, it examines the relevance of the literary unit for contemporary Ghanaian society where ethnic divisions seem to compromise nation-building and development. The text challenges Ghanaian Christians to employ a language of inclusion; to recognize the ‘other’ as a specific message of God; to go beyond accidental attributes such as ethnicity, gender, or race, to discover the image and likeness of God reflected in her/his countenance.

In: Mission Studies