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Brill's Religious Studies, Theology and Philosophy E-Books Online, Collection 2000-2006 is the electronic version of the book publication program of Brill in the field of Religious Studies, Theology and Philosophy from 2000-2006.

Coverage:
Religious Studies, Theology, Philosophy, Christianity, History of Religion, Religion & Society, Missionary Studies

This E-Book Collection is part of Brill's Religious Studies, Theology and Philosophy E-Books Online Collection.

The title list and free MARC records are available for download here.

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Author: Judith Gruber

Abstract

This article starts from the observation that current debates about race and racism are often couched in soteriological terms such as guilt and forgiveness, or confession and exoneration, and it argues that this overlap calls for theological analysis. Using the debate about Achille Mbembe’s disinvitation from the German art festival ‘Ruhrtriennale’ 2020 as a case that is typical of a specifically Western European discourse on race, it first sketches a brief genealogy of the modern/colonial history of religio-racialisation and its intersections with Christian tradition, in which racial categories were forged in soteriological discourses, and in which, in turn, soteriological categories were shaped by racist discourses. It proposes that in this process, Christianity, Whiteness and salvation were conflated in a way that has sponsored White supremacy, disguised as innocence. Engaging with performative race theory, the article concludes by making a constructive proposal for a performative theology of race that can account for the profound intersections between racism and soteriology, but also opens trajectories for transforming hegemonic discourses of race and their theological underpinnings.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society
In: Philosophia Reformata
In: Philosophia Reformata

Abstract

This article is concerned with the theological implications of God’s laughter as pictured in Psalm 2:4 in view of sketching a basic comic theology proper. Since laughter is conceived by some as an overwhelming human emotion, divine laughter can be problematic. To make its case for a comic theology proper, the biblical scholarship with regard to Psalm 2 is first explored in order to establish the psalm’s content, then the current debate on im/passibility is explored to determine what is at stake in attributing emotions to God. Subsequently, the reading strategies of both analytic and narrative theology are followed to assess the theological implications of divine laughter in Psalm 2. It is concluded that divine laughter can be proper to God as an affectionate act to bring justice and reconciliation on earth.

In: Journal of Reformed Theology
In: Journal of Reformed Theology

Abstract

This article is an English translation of an essay originally published in the journal Zeitschrift für dialektische Theologie in 1989. In it, Friedrich-Wilhelm Marquardt revisits Karl Barth’s proposal in § 23 of Church Dogmatics that ‘biblical attitude’ is the first among several norms for Christian dogmatics. The article compares Barth’s emphasis on the ‘biblical formfulness’ of theology with the program of the Dutch Reformed theologian K.H. Miskotte, which seeks to educate Christians in the ‘iconic language’ of Scripture. It argues that Miskotte is concerned with hermeneutics in such a way that “Rudolf Bultmann’s name belongs—maybe before Barth’s—in proximity to Miskotte’s.” In contrast to Bultmann, however, Miskotte aims at teaching a language and generating speech rather than catalyzing self-understanding.

In: Journal of Reformed Theology
In: Journal of Reformed Theology
Author: Ton van Eijk

Abstract

The starting point of this article is a text of Irenaeus in defense of the resurrection of the body against the Gnostics. In the very different context of the zweiter Abendmahlsstreit in the 16th century this text was part of a dossier of Patristic texts that was used by both parties, Lutheran and Reformed. One of the issues was whether the body of Christ was eaten by the mouth or by faith. It will be shown how Calvin and Heshusius understood this text. In the end it will appear that for various reasons the issue seems to have lost its relevance. With the Leuenberg Agreement the dispute was laid to rest.

In: Journal of Reformed Theology