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This series publishes monographs and edited collections on texts traditionally studied as “Old Testament Pseudepigrapha” and related topics. It seeks to foster new research, not just on the importance of such texts for understanding early Judaism and Christianity, but also on their significance for the later periods in which they were copied, translated, excerpted, and transmitted. The scope of the series includes the material philology and manuscripts of so-called “pseudepigrapha” as well as the Jewish, Christian, Islamic, and other contexts of their reception in late antique, medieval, and modern eras. Special concerns include broadening the scholarly conversation around "pseudepigrapha" to include more diverse and global perspectives.

The series published two volumes over the last 5 years.
The Biblical Interpretation Series accommodates monographs, collections of essays and works of reference that are concerned with the discussion or application of new methods of interpreting the Bible. Works published in the series ordinarily either give a practical demonstration of how a particular approach may be instructively applied to a Biblical text or texts, or make a productive contribution to the discussion of method. The series thus provides a vehicle for the exercise and development of a whole range of newer techniques of interpretation, including feminist readings, semiotic, post-structuralist, reader-oriented, materialist, deconstructionist and other types of literary readings, ideological, ecological and psychological readings, among many others.

The series published an average of seven volumes per year over the last 5 years.
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In: Biblical Interpretation
This volume contains an English translation of the Arabic translation and commentary on the book of Proverbs composed by one of the most acclaimed, innovative, and prolific exegetes of the Karaite “Golden Age” (10th –11th centuries), Yefet ben ʿEli ha-Levi. A critical edition and an extensive introduction was published by Ilana Sasson as vol. 1 (KTS 8) in 2016. Dr. Sasson worked for many years on an English translation of the work and, before her untimely death in 2017, passed her unfinished manuscript to the series editors. The translation was then completed, edited, and prepared for publication by Dr. Wechsler. Yefet’s commentary on Proverbs is a masterpiece of literary and rational-contextual analysis of one of the most difficult and important books of wisdom in the Hebrew Bible. His work is an invaluable link in the history of interpretation of the book of Proverbs.
In: The Arabic Translation and Commentary of Yefet ben 'Eli on the Book of Proverbs
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In this work, Jeehei Park proposes Greek and Roman cosmopolitanism as a constructive category through which to navigate a reading of human diversity and communal unity in Paul’s letters. Park takes a thorough look at the cosmopolitan ideas of Diogenes of Sinope, Philo, Plutarch, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius to establish Paul as an interlocutor who critically participated in the discourse of cosmopolitanism. Park characterizes Paul’s understanding of unity with the distinctive phrase “heterogeneous unity,” in which human differences are respected and embraced rather than being universalized or homogenized. This book offers a novel analysis of Paul’s rhetoric about citizenship in Philippians and its adoption of Greek and Roman cosmopolitanism as an interpretive contour.
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This book reads the Joseph novella alongside contemporary trauma novels in order to analyze the loss of the assumptive world of the writer and readers of the Joseph novella. In turn, it re-thinks trauma theory in light of the “religious,” understood as the belief in and relationship to a God who orders the universe. Thus, this book argues that when we read the Joseph novella alongside contemporary trauma novels, we see a story written by people trying to reconstruct their assumptive world after the shattering of their old one, highlighting the significance of the religious dimension in trauma theory.
This volume focuses on Christianity in Attica and its metropolis, Athens, from Paul’s initial visit in the first century up to the closing of the philosophical schools under the reign of Justinian I in the sixth century. Underscoring the relevance of epigraphic resources and the importance of methodological sophistication in analysing especially archaeological evidence, it readdresses many questions on the basis of a larger body of evidence and aims to combine literary, epigraphic, and archaeological evidence in order to create the outlines of a narrative of the rise and development of Christianity in the area. It is the first interdisciplinary study on the local history of Christianity in the area.
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This book addresses the dearth of study in Lukan scholarship on the transfiguration account and provides a model of new exodus based on the Song of the Sea (Exod 15) beyond the two major—Deuteronomi(sti)c and Isaianic—models. The proposed Exodus 15 pattern explicates the enigmatic phrase “his ‘exodus’ in Jerusalem” in the transfiguration account. It also elucidates how the seemingly discordant motifs of Moses and David are conjoined within a larger drama of the (new) exodus and the subsequent establishment of Israel’s (eschatological) worship space. This shows how Luke deals with the issues of temple (Acts 7), circumcision (Acts 15), and the ambivalent nature of Jerusalem.
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The Syriac reception of the story of Joseph offers an unprecedented glimpse into late antique Syriac literary culture. The story inspired a diverse body of texts, written in prose, narrative poetry, dialogue poetry, and metrical homilies, including the greatest narrative poem written in Syriac. These texts explore and retell the story of Joseph with a combination of exegetical imagination, playful creativity, and a relentless focus on the exemplary virtues of the patriarch. Read through a typological lens, this study shows how the story also became an important locus of Christian-Jewish polemic.