Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for :

  • Archaeology x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
This series offers art-historical and interdisciplinary approaches to how art was conceived, produced, and received across Europe, from the early medieval to the early modern. It pays particular attention to the social, cultural, religious, and political history of the period as seen through contemporary visual and material culture.

The series is interested in all areas of European artistic life in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Work in the series explores art forms such as painting, sculpture, architecture, textiles, glass, metalwork, ceramics, ephemera, spatial strategies, and more. Themes of study may include emotions, the senses, devotional practices, the environment, animals, bodies, otherness, religious and social changes, literacy (written and visual), protest, and issues of class, race, and gender, to name only a few. Interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary, and comparative work is also warmly welcomed. The series publishes monographs, edited thematic collections, and reference works.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to either the series editors, Professor Sarah Blick and Professor Laura D. Gelfand or the Publisher at Brill, Dr Kate Hammond.

Brill is in full support of Open Access publishing and offers the option to publish your monograph, edited volume, or chapter in Open Access. Our Open Access services are fully compliant with funder requirements. We support Creative Commons licenses. For more information, please visit Brill Open or contact us at openacess@brill.com.

Abstract

A distinct concentration of 150 gallery graves dating to the Late Neolithic (2400–1700 BC) occurs in Göteryd parish in the South Swedish Uplands. This study investigates why such a concentration of gallery graves exists in this region and why these were not exchanged by new monuments in the Bronze Age. In order to discuss these issues, the distribution of the monuments and the stray finds have been analysed and correlated to the results of local pollen analysis. The results support the impression of abandonment at the transition from the Neolithic to the Bronze Age. The processes of expansion and abandonment seem to reflect general population trends, as discussed in recent works on population dynamics. Göteryd parish is a highland region and marginal from an agricultural point of view, but it borders on fertile and plain coastal areas, which are easily accessible through river valleys. In periods of population growth, Göteryd parish would absorb people from the coastal plains, a process that probably was reversed when the population shrank. The geographical position of the Göteryd area created a particular dynamic and made it vulnerable to changes in population dynamics, social networks, and climate.

In: Acta Archaeologica

Abstract

Archaeological excavations at Unguja Ukuu recovered a rock crystal cabochon seal with the word lillāh (“for God”) inscribed in the Kufic script on its domed surface. The artifact is an intaglio amulet seal engraved in the negative. Microscopic examination of the seal surfaces reveals that a rotary tool was used to make the initial inscription. At some later point, a diagonal spall was removed across part of the inscription. The diagonal spall appears to be along a natural crystal plane. It is impossible to determine if this was the result of intentional defacement or an accidental process that might have resulted in the eventual deposition of the seal. Strata dated by radiometric and relative methods coupled with the style of the Kufic script date the seal to the late-8th to 9th centuries CE. This artifact is the earliest known example of an Islamic amulet seal and of writing in the Zanzibar Archipelago.

In: Journal of African Archaeology

Abstract

The recent discovery of Nile crocodile remains in the mortuary complexes of two high-ranking courtiers of Nebhepetra Mentuhotep II, located in the early Middle Kingdom necropolis in the valley of North Asasif, opened the way to an exploration of the role of reptile remains in funerary contexts. The skeletal remains, which were not mummified, consisted of fragments of the skull and mandible, loose teeth, and osteoderms. This paper explores the association that may have existed between the deceased and the crocodile god Sobek, whom the ancient Egyptians identified with pharaonic power, inundation and fertility. From the Middle Kingdom, Sobek, who was believed to have risen from the Primeval Waters, was merged with the sun-god Ra, and in the solar form of Sobek-Ra was made part of the eternal journey of the sun from the east to the west. This association was also reflected in the Spells of the Coffin Texts, in which the deceased became Sobek.

In: Journal of African Archaeology
In An Archaeological, Sociological and Historical Study, volume 2 of The Oasis of Bukhara, Rocco Rante, Florian Schwarz and Luigi Tronca engage in a strong, pluridisciplinary collaboration and use an innovative approach to offer a new contribution to the history of the oasis of Bukhara from the end of the last millennium BCE to the end of the medieval era. Referencing archaeological, historical and sociological data, the book revisits the history of this Central Asian region, giving the reader, specialist and general reader a detailed description of the political and socio-economical features that characterized the oasis during this long chronological span.
Author: Brian M. Fagan

Abstract

This brief report describes the animal bones from the first millennium BC discovered during Graham Connah’s excavations at Daima Mound in northeastern Nigeria in 1965–66. The faunal research was completed by the author in 1973, but, owing to various circumstances, it has not been possible to publish the report until now. Eighty percent of the 657 positively identified bones come from domestic cattle, probably a small-statured breed. They were mostly slaughtered while young adults, which suggests they were surplus males. Small stock, probably goats, and also hunting were less important. The inhabitants consumed shallow water fish, mainly Clariidae (catfish), easily trapped in shallow pools. The small Daima collection confirms faunal data from other Lake Chad sites, which show that cattle herding was an important activity during the first millennium BC.

In: Journal of African Archaeology
In: The Oasis of Bukhara, Volume 2: An Archaeological, Sociological and Historical Study
In: The Oasis of Bukhara, Volume 2: An Archaeological, Sociological and Historical Study
In: The Oasis of Bukhara, Volume 2: An Archaeological, Sociological and Historical Study

Abstract

Kansyore pottery-using groups of the northeastern Lake Victoria Basin represent one of only a few examples of ‘complex’ hunter-gatherers in Africa. Archaeologists link evidence of specialized fishing, a seasonal land-use cycle between lake and riverine sites, and intensive investment in ceramic production to behavioral complexity after 9 thousand years ago (ka). However, a gap in the Kansyore radiocarbon record of the region between ~7 and 4.4 cal ka limits explanations of when and why social and economic changes occurred. This study provides the first evidence of lakeshore occupation during this temporal break at the only well-studied Kansyore site in eastern Uganda, Namundiri A. Within the context of other sites in nearby western Kenya, radiometric and faunal data from the site indicate a move from the lake to a greater reliance on riverine habitats with middle Holocene aridity ~5–4 cal ka and the arrival of food producers to the region after ~3 cal ka.

Open Access
In: Journal of African Archaeology