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Abstract

Teachers want their students to learn, and they want that learning to be equitable, with opportunities for all students. But not all students have the same needs for success. Therefore, classroom accommodations are provided through Disability Offices within universities. These accommodations are intended to be implemented in each course the student takes. Yet the actual enactment of accommodations relies on facilitation and implementation by each instructor in collaboration with the student, which may lead to variance in the level of accommodations. This project examined student interviews and student and faculty survey data to construct a narrative analysis of students’ experiences when they discuss their accommodations with their instructors. This manuscript reports a characterization of these interactions and how these interactions shape students’ success in the classroom, with recommendations for both students and instructors.

Open Access
In: Journal of Disability Studies in Education
Editor-in-Chief:
This is a peer-reviewed, inclusive, non-Eurocentric, multi-disciplinary book series devoted to the interdisciplinary study of ancient civilizations from all continents.
- ALAC is fully-funded by the Research Centre For History and Culture (RCHC). All volumes are published under a CC BY-NC-ND license.
- Proposals must present original work and must have been submitted exclusively to ALAC. Both monographs and edited volumes are welcome.
- Submissions may regard any civilizations from any continents, developed between prehistory and the 15th century AD, that is, the fall of the Eastern Roman Empire.
- Submissions may regard any aspects of Antiquity: history, archaeology, art and architecture, philology, linguistics, literature, philosophy, religion studies, sociology, anthropology, etc.
- ALAC also considers studies of oral literature, such as proverbs and folklore, as well as field work on endangered languages, which represent the legacy of ancient traditions verbally transmitted from generation to generation.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and full manuscripts by email to the Series Editors: Professor CHEN Zhi , Professor Carlotta Viti , and Professor WANG Xiang (Shawn Wang) .
Series Editor:
The expression “popular culture” alludes, essentially, to a form of culture that makes little, if any, categorical distinctions between “high or serious culture” and “low or entertainment culture,” making it historically a non-traditional form of culture. In the evolution of human cultures, popular culture stands out as atypical, since it takes cultural material from any source and revamps it according to the laws of the marketplace. In contrast to historical (traditional) culture, it rejects both the supremacy of tradition and of established cultural norms, as well as the pretensions of intellectualist tendencies within contemporary artistic cultures. Popular culture has always been highly appealing for this very reason, bestowing on common people the assurance that cultural trends are for everyone, not just for an elite class of artists and cognoscenti. It is thus populist, unpredictable, and highly ephemeral, reflecting the ever-changing tastes of one generation after another. Moreover, among the ephemeral trends and texts, there are some that have risen to the level of high art, hence the paradox and power of popular culture.

Brill Research Perspectives in Popular Culture is a peer-reviewed series and reference publication that features studies exploring all aspects of popular culture today, from its traditional platforms, audiences and traditional electronic media, to the contemporary digital media. Each installment comprises a single, uniquely focused short monograph that presents the state of the art on a specific theme and examines some particular aspect, text, or event that falls under the rubric of “pop culture,” including popular programs (sitcoms, adventure series, etc.); celebrities; fads; theories of the popular imagination; the relation of popular culture to other cultures; the role of memetic culture vis-à-vis traditional forms of culture; the nature of performance; the psychological, anthropological, and semiotic aspects of popular culture systems; and the like. In addition, studies will also look at specific frameworks for analyzing popular culture, such as archetype theory and carnival theory.

The intended audience of Brill Research Perspectives in Popular Culture is the network of scholars and instructors involved in popular culture studies and cognate disciplines (psychology, culture studies, literary criticism, anthropology, musicology, sociology, neuroscience, and art criticism).

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Katie Short.

The European Association for American Studies Series
Series Editor:
European Perspectives on the United States: The European Association for American Studies Series is published under the auspices and with the editorial involvement of the European Association for American Studies. This peer-reviewed series provides a broad reflection of the state of American Studies in Europe. While the series prioritizes academic works that accentuate the importance of transnationality and interdisciplinarity in the study of the United States, it aims to properly recognize the diverse and relevant European achievements in the main disciplines of American Studies, to include but not limited to literary studies, cultural studies, film and media studies, history, and the social sciences. Benefiting from the varied professional alignments of European Americanists, European Perspectives on the United States will initiate new directions of dialogue in American Studies by opening the field to voices from across nations and continents.

European Perspectives on the United States has value for a wide and diverse range of academics and postdoctoral and postgraduate research students representing an array of disciplines within the humanities and social sciences. The series is intended to serve as an inclusive resource for researchers and readers with a multi-/interdisciplinary focus in American Studies. Given the central importance of American Studies in relation to key questions of global import relating to climate, migration, borders, Black Lives Matter, #MeToo, terrorism, and many other topics, the series serves as a much-needed forum to foster dialogue and cooperation within and between spheres of inquiry and activity.

Manuscripts should be at least 80,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations and other visual material. The editors will consider proposals for original monographs, edited collections, translations, and critical primary source editions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Simona Casadio.

Authors will find general proposal guidelines at the Brill Author Gateway.
Collection dirigée par Myriam Díaz-Diocaretz.

Series discontinued.
Identity, Freedom, and Moral Imagination in the Baltics
Does it make sense to refer to the social and political existence of the Baltic countries as to being between civilizations of East and West, or as being on the boundary of two worlds? What are the most characteristic features of modern moral imagination? How does it manifest itself in the politics and cultures of the Baltic countries? These will be the main foci of the book series intended and launched as a critical examination of identity, politics, and culture in the Baltic countries. We are not going to confine this series to Soviet and post-Communist studies. By offering a wide scope of the social science and humanities disciplines, we would like to encourage intercultural dialogue and also to pursue interdisciplinary research in the field of Baltic studies.

As of Volume 44, the series is published by Verlag Ferdinand Schöninghclick here.

The series published an average of 2,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.

Abstract

The aim is to examine the work at a Swedish preschool that is striving to become inclusive for a group of children with disabilities. The bioecological model and a mixed method case study design were adopted. One head teacher, ten preschool staff members, and four children with disabilities participated. Data were collected by way of observations, one focus group interview, and two retrospective interviews. Statistical and thematic data analyses were conducted. Ethical approval was obtained. A decision is made to create a new unit in the preschool. The unit is given a specialised organisational typology. The preschool integrates activities and different types of support provisions. The quality of inclusion practices and support provisions in the preschool is almost good. At a time when inclusion is valued, this study can provide a basis for interesting discussions about preschool inclusion in Sweden and other countries.

Open Access
In: Journal of Disability Studies in Education

Abstract

In January 1966, Cuban President Fidel Castro announced at the Tricontinental Conference the killing of more than 100,000 people in Indonesia and the destruction of the left movement in that country. The 1965–66 massacre of members and sympathisers of the Indonesian Communist Party (Partai Komunis Indonesia, pki) in Indonesia ushered in the authoritarian New Order regime under General Suharto, marking a realignment in Cold War politics. This article examines the battle to represent Indonesia by two competing delegations at the Tricontinental Conference and the materials left behind as traces of Cold War era social movements and tricontinentalism. The aim of the article is twofold. Drawing on archival research, oral history interviews, ego-documents, and ethnographic observations, the article consists of a partial reconstruction of the Indonesian intervention at the Tricontinental Conference, arguably the last public, international intervention by Indonesian leftists. The second part of the article examines the archives, broadly defined, used in the reconstruction and the research process itself, given the contested nature of these memories. In so doing, the article illustrates how the end of the Cold War, the rise of new media and technologies, and democratisation in Indonesia have contributed to the transmission of memories of this past to audiences in and outside of Indonesia.

In: Bandung
Author:

Abstract

Tricontinentalism, the radical ideational universe of the Global South so important in the 1960s and 1970s, lost much of its original thrust with the neoliberal turn, and its contribution to global history has long been obscured. Recently, however, historians, political theorists and others have been studying its take on global justice and the multiple impacts of its political strategies, ideological rhetoric, identity formations, as well as its many transnational connections: traces still recognisable in the repertoire of social movements today. By unearthing these strands and constellations of global history, and by sometimes cooperating with activists, these scholars act as Foucauldian genealogists, laying bare sediments of historical agency that the hegemonic memory formation of neoliberalism had all but buried. Such efforts constitute a form of counter-history in the competitive field of political memory. This paper applies elements of mnemonic hegemony theory (mht) to analyse Tricontinental memory, with a particular focus on Latin America.

Open Access
In: Bandung