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Abstract

In Tanzania Traditional Medicine (TM) provides primary health services to more than 60% of the population. Tanzania incorporated TM into the 1996 Health Policy and enacted the Traditional Medicine Act, 2002, to formalise TM practices. This article argues that the legal and policy frameworks guiding the provision of health services in the country undermine the practices of Traditional Health Practitioners (THPs) with respect to the provision of primary health services in the rural areas. This study was conducted in Bukoba District, Tanzania, to find out how TM coexisted with the biomedical system in the provision of health services. Data was collected by reviewing the National Health Policy and the Traditional Medicine Act, 2002, observing the facilities that THPs used and interviewing 50 respondents who were purposefully selected. The findings of the study revealed that the government didn’t fund TM, that there was no proper administrative coordination of TM, poor representation of THPs in the TM administration organs and that THPs were unaware of the laws that guided their practices. We recommend reviewing the health policy to includes a detailed administrative structure for TM, a source of funds for TM and proper representation of THPs in the TM administration organs.

In: The African Review

Muuse Yuusuf. 2021. The Genesis of the Civil War in Somalia: The Impact of Foreign Military Intervention on the Continent. London, New York. Oxford. New Delhi, Sydney: I.B. Tauris. i–ix; 255 pp; hardback. Price not stated. ISBN: 978-0-7556-2709-7.

Josephine Beoku-Betts & Fredline A. M’Cormack-Hale. Editors. 2022. War, Women and Post-Conflict Empowerment: Lessons from Sierra Leone. i–xxii, 282. ISBN: 978-1-78699-693-0.

Both books are about aspects of war in Africa, the second largest continent. The Genesis of the Civil War in Somalia: The Impact of Foreign Military Intervention on the Continent by

In: African and Asian Studies
Author: Eleanor Coghill

Geoffrey Khan and Paul M. Noorlander (eds) (2021): Studies in the Grammar and Lexicon of Neo-Aramaic, Open Book Publishers

This collection of papers presents current linguistic research on modern Aramaic varieties, containing contributions from a majority of the scholars active in the field. It covers all the surviving branches of Aramaic: Western Neo-Aramaic, Ṭuroyo/Ṣurayt, North-Eastern Neo-Aramaic (NENA) and, to a lesser extent, Neo-Mandaic. All these varieties are endangered and documentation remains a priority, so it is encouraging to see data from new fieldwork presented in many of the articles.

The book covers all the main areas of

Open Access
In: Brill's Journal of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics
Author: Myriam Dali

Karin Ryding and David Wilmsen (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Arabic Linguistics . 2021. Cambridge University Press. ISBN: 9781108417303.

The Cambridge Handbook of Arabic Linguistics is a collection of multidisciplinary articles carefully selected by Karin Ryding (Georgetown University) and David Wilmsen (American University of Beirut). The volume is a very ambitious and successful one, which aims, among many other goals, to bring together articles from a wide spectrum of research interests in Arabic linguistics, both traditional and contemporary. The diversity of the articles reflects the broadened horizon for Arabic linguistics analysis, and the

In: Brill's Journal of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics

Abstract

As various studies have uncovered, a significant number of states in Africa remain in abject poverty and are underdeveloped, long after the end of colonialism. These degrading economic conditions are further reinforced by authoritarian political cultures, unending instability and civil wars. The few exceptions include Botswana, South Africa and Mauritius. To stimulate national economic and social progress, African countries have experimented with different development models. In this paper, we compare the developmental state experiences of Ethiopia and Mauritius. A qualitative research approach was used, and the study is based entirely on an analysis of secondary data sources. The analysis proceeds by using comparative techniques. The findings of the study reveal that though the employment of the developmental state model resulted in growth in both Ethiopia and Mauritius, the way in which they instituted key policies and institutions of the developmental state has been quite different.

In: Africa Review

Abstract

This study attempts to offer a single unified account for the syntactic features of the pronominal copula in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA), traditionally known as ḍamīr al-faṣl ‘Separation Pronoun/SP’ within the Cardiff Grammar (CG) model of Systemic Functional Grammar (SFG). Such a pronoun is typically used in nominal verbless clauses to separate Subject from its Predicate (Complement) when both are definite. This study argues against the two traditional accounts that analyze it either as a redundant pronoun that has no significant syntactical function or as the second Subject in the nominal embedded clausal Complement of the first Subject. The study also proposes that the modern generative account that considers it a pronominal copula is problematic as the function of this pronoun is not linking, but rather separating, emphasizing, and disambiguating. Therefore, the study proposes to analyze this SP as an Extension of the Subject (SEx) in a tripartite structure.

In: Brill's Journal of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics

Abstract

The world has reached the threshold of an absolute overhaul and reconfiguration of society and workplaces. The transformation is being caused by the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR), which is changing every facet of life, including education. The revolution is epitomised by breakthroughs in fields such as artificial intelligence, robotics, biotechnology and quantum computing, among others. This comes at a time when the United Nations has conceived the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG s) under Agenda 2030. The convergence of SDG s and 4IR cannot be overemphasised. The implementation of 4IR technologies, such as artificial intelligence (AI), learning analytics and the Internet of Things, promotes inclusive, equitable and quality education that is in sync with SDG 4. Zimbabwe’s updated curriculum for 2015 to 2022 has emphasised ICT and learner-centred learning in the expectation that this transformation in the education sector will create competent, problem-solving and critical thinkers with the zeal to modernise society.

In: Africa Review
Free access
In: Brill's Journal of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics

Abstract

This article is a preliminary critical assessment of Uganda’s current refugee policy, ReHOPE, in the north-western part of the country. The research was based on quantitative and qualitative data gathered over six weeks in 2018 and 2019. The article is centred on national efforts to implement the UN-mandated Sustainable Development Goal #5, “gender equity and empower all women and girls”. Here the focus is on the policy as it relates to formal education, technical training and livelihood improvements and the empowerment of female South Sudan refugees in two settlements in Adjumani District. ReHOPE is a very complex, ambitious and costly programme. The data from this study seems to indicate that the goals of refugee female empowerment and improved livelihoods are not being widely realised in the two Adjumani settlements accessed. However, it is suggested that future studies of ReHOPE policies should be more extensive than the present one and researchers, employing mixed methodologies, should spend more time on the ground than a few weeks.

In: Africa Review
Author: Hezy Mutzafi

Abstract

The spectrum of Neo-Aramaic languages and dialects, spoken in an arch of language-islets that stretch from south-western Syria to south-western Iran, exhibits rich lexical repositories inherited from early layers of the Aramaic language. Within this wealthy lexical legacy, some genuine Aramaic lexical items are not attested in any of the literary Aramaic sources, hence it is only by virtue of these modern lexical manifestations that the existence of the ancient Aramaic antecedents of these words can be inferred or reconstructed. Such historical lacunae concern also meanings that must be of considerable antiquity, yet these meanings, pertaining to well-known Aramaic words, have no evidence in literary Aramaic, having surfaced only in the modern era. This article discusses ten selected cases of pre-modern Aramaic words and meanings that were discovered by etymological and comparative examination of their modern reflexes in North-Eastern Neo-Aramaic (NENA), Western Neo-Aramaic and Ṭuroyo.

In: Brill's Journal of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics