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In: International Journal of Parliamentary Studies
Author:

Abstract

Since the imposition of lockdowns or restrictions on social mobility in response to pandemics in 2020, the operations of many governments have undergone a radical transformation. Indonesia’s compliance with the new health protocols did not stand out as exceptional in this regard. This article investigates how and to what extent the Indonesian Parliament utilized ict during the pandemic, as well as the future viability of ict as a legislative tool. This article argues that the Parliament’s use of ict during the pandemic improved its effectiveness, efficiency, and openness in carrying out its responsibilities. In addition, the number of mp s in attendance – albeit virtual – increased. This article suggests that appropriate regulation is required to authorize the use of ict in legislative activities and that trained human resources are necessary to address cyber-related errors resulting from external threats. Additionally, the adoption of ict should not be limited to digitizing legislative activities. It must be founded on the institution’s core business.

In: International Journal of Parliamentary Studies

Abstract

While scholars on gender provisions have focused on why and how this type of peace agreement clause gets incorporated, few studies have sought to improve our understanding of the implementation process. Addressing this gap empirically, this study utilizes unique interview material to analyze the initial stages of realizing the 2014 Comprehensive Agreement on the Bangsamoro in the Philippines. The article bridges and expands on key theoretical insights based on three explanations suggested by previous research: 1) state capacity on promoting gender equality; 2) the mobilization of women’s organizations; and 3) gender awareness of international actors. We find that the strategic actions of women’s organizations combined with state capacity accelerated the implementation. However, their influence was dependent on whether or not the government prioritized the gender provisions, and whether international actors provided financial support to the agreement infrastructure.

Open Access
In: International Negotiation

Abstract

This article interrogates the issue of the role of the legislature in social emergencies such as the Covid-19 pandemic by examining the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the legislature and the response of the legislature, using the Nigerian federal legislative institution (the National Assembly) as a case study. The aim is to distil some of the key legislative issues that have emerged since the spread of the virus to Nigeria, the challenges the legislature has faced, which have shaped its efforts to respond to the Covid-19 problem, and the efforts of the legislature to address the problem. The article notes that Nigeria’s federal legislature, and indeed all legislatures, have to innovate with new ideas, technology and procedural flexibility in the performance of their traditional functions in order to ensure political accountability and remain relevant in times of emergency.

In: International Journal of Parliamentary Studies
Author:

Abstract

This special issue of International Negotiation explores how justice is, and may best be, negotiated when parties adhere to conflicting notions of what it means and requires. “Conflicting notions” refer to the endorsement of different principles or to conflicting interpretations of how the same justice principle is to be applied. It may also involve some party’s adhering to a justice principle, while its counterpart endorses criteria other than justice as the proper basis for the case at hand. A diversity of cases and methodological traditions is used to explore a set of analytical questions: Why do parties adhere to conflicting notions of justice in international negotiations? How do conflicting justice notions affect negotiation dynamics and what are different ways in which they can be handled? Are some ways of handling such notions better than others, in the sense of enhancing the chances of a durable agreement?

Open Access
In: International Negotiation
Author:

Abstract

Creative and courageous negotiations between 1990 and 1994 enabled South African leaders to end apartheid and manage the first phase of a transition to a constitutional democracy. Land was a key issue in the struggle for democracy, but after thirty years remains unresolved. The Bill of Rights in the Constitution affords protection for property rights but also commits the government to land reform by way of restitution or redress of the disadvantaged who suffered through dispossession following the 1913 Land Act. The failure of government’s three-track system to deliver on the goals it set for transfer of land from white to black ownership has strengthened demands for radical change. This article explores the prospects of negotiation as a means for resolving obstacles to progress, including the problem of competing notions of justice. New levels of engagement between stakeholders enabling a sense of justness in the process and outcome are required.

In: International Negotiation

Summary

The democratisation of diplomacy in recent years has opened up new opportunities for non-state actors’ engagement and activities in the public interest or on behalf of governments. Scholarly literature has broadly reflected the inclusion of civil society into governance frameworks, non-state public diplomacy and non-governmental institutions. Nevertheless, due to the complexity of these issues, as well as their dynamics and rapid innovations, many blind spots remain. This article focuses on the neglected topic of the engagement of future practitioners, students in diplomacy-related undergraduate and graduate university programmes, in people-to-people diplomatic communication. Drawing on the concept of grassroots diplomacy, it examines the activities of the Junior Diplomat Initiative. It deconstructs the effect of student organisations’ diplomacy projects by showing how they translate into innovative interactions with domestic and foreign youth communities. Lessons for diplomatic practice are also addressed.

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy