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Potosí (today Bolivia) was the major supplier for the Spanish Empire and for the world and still nowadays, boasts the world's single-richest silver deposit. This book explores the political economy of silver production and circulation illuminating a vital chapter in the history of global capitalism. It travels through geology, sacred spaces, and technical knowledge in the first section; environmental history and labor in the second section; silver flows, the heterogeneous world of mining producers, and their agency in the third; and some of the local, regional, and global impacts, in the fourth section.

The main focus is on the set-up of a complex infrastructure at the site, its major changes, and the new human and environmental landscape that emerged for the production of one of the world´s major commodities: silver. Eleven authors from different countries, present their most recent research based on years of archival research providing the readers with cutting-edge scholarship.

Contributors are: Julio Aguilar, James Almeida, Rossana Barragán Romano, Mariano A. Bonialian, Thérèse Bouysse-Cassagne, Kris Lane, Tristan Platt, Renée Raphael, Masaki Sato, Heidi V. Scott, and Paula C. Zagalsky.
In: Protest
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In: Protest
In: Protest
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Abstract

This article rethinks Gezi Protests as a sui generis women’s movement which continues to this day, albeit in a form of unorganized flow. To make this point, the article focuses on the Gezi and Post-Gezi lifeworld experiences of women knowledge workers who participated in the Protests. It is argued that the worker-citizen experiences of these women have provided them with a specific epistemic advantage, which has turned in an emancipatory standpoint during the Gezi and has been reproduced since then – despite significant setbacks. Although still lacking a corresponding feminist counter-hegemonic project, the emancipatory standpoint of the women-in-movement of Gezi Protests is not only negative and adaptive but also formative. It immanently stands for the rationalization of all forms of governance. In that regard, it represents a wish for a new public power rather than a demand for entitlement and recognition by an already existing state.

In: Protest
In: Protest
Author:

Abstract

Most universities champion “community engagement” and “inclusion” as core values of their institutions. But what does it mean to meaningfully engage with communities, or to foster more inclusive learning environments? I address this question by reviewing my experiences co-teaching with communities and detailing the challenges I have encountered – building relationships, managing time constraints, and negotiating participants’ divergent expectations. I develop the concept of grassroots pedagogy, which argues that teaching grounded in radical honesty and social justice upends traditional notions of expertise, strengthens higher education’s commitment to service, and promotes a culture of democracy. Highlighting the voices of people who have historically been excluded from higher education may create more engaged and inclusive institutions, in turn helping universities live up to the values they profess.

In: Protest
In: Protest