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Abstract

The era in which we live is known geologically as the anthropocene. Conceptualizing it as a psychological phenomenon is rare; this article contributes to that effort. The anthropocene is a potent symbol of destruction, active in psyches of both individuals and the collective. Jung’s Answer to Job examined apocalyptic tragedy in one man’s life. A feature of that tragedy was distinct roles: perpetrator and victim. Considering the apocalyptic possibilities of the anthropocene requires less-distinct separation of those roles. In these times, people’s responses to threat illustrate how the anthropocene is psychologically burdensome, for some people more than others. As do other symbols, the anthropocene places both interior demands and external responsibilities on the psyche. Some are presented, to illustrate a Jungian perspective on the psychological problems and healing imperatives of the era in which we live.

In: International Journal of Jungian Studies
Author: Janice Hila

Abstract

Jung’s conception, his articulation, and his relationship to the anima and animus and then more current thoughts and relationships to them, a deeper understanding of the archetype and its future manifestations in the unconscious are examined. When one considers how Jung developed his theory of the anima and animus and the gender-bias that he demonstrates in his articulation of the concept, one can understand why the concept was then, and continues to be, difficult to grasp. Jung was a product of his time and so it is with the changes in gender roles and the rise in awareness of the LGBTQ community that new ideas are surfacing about how to view the archetypes of anima and animus. Within this research, Hillman and other post-Jungian theorists lend their opinions and elucidations of the anima/animus archetype with major revisions and questions raised for consideration. Connections between contemporary gender issues are addressed, especially feminism and transgenderism. Questions for further research and consideration such as the relationship between psychic reality, biological reality, and neurological reality and the relationships between the individual unconscious and the collective unconscious in relation to gender are posed. To conclude, Jung seems to have moved into a place of greater wisdom and relation to his unconscious material over the course of his life, perhaps signalling future relations between anima and animus, i.e. the inner other gendered archetype, in both individuals and society.

In: International Journal of Jungian Studies

Abstract

According to the Kabbalistic Lurianic mysticism, the divine light fell into the world because of the rupture of the vessels. The sparks of light became alienated from their transcendent origin and have to be reunified. Likewise, for Jung, individuation is a process of wholeness and reclaiming to consciousness splits of the psyche. The Lurianic myth may be an archetypal motif of the psyche. It may also be viewed as an imaginal field where transformation occurs, with an activation of the archetype of the Self, the birth of a new relationship to the Self, and a new attitude towards the world.

In: International Journal of Jungian Studies
Author: Jesse Russell

Abstract

Within William Shakespeare’s play Coriolanus, the title character Caius Martius Coriolanus refers to himself as a “lonely dragon.” This image of a dragon in the play represents a powerful fusion of Celtic, Nordic, and classical myth as well as Christian theology—all of which contain depictions of dragons. Reading Martius as a dragon, using Jungian and archetypal terms mediated through Icelandic literature, unveils Shakespeare’s use of myth to fashion Caius Martius’s transformation into an untamable anti-social beast whose primal violence and aggression ultimately leads to his slaying by Aufidius, the dragon-like dragon-slayer.

In: International Journal of Jungian Studies
Free access
In: International Journal of Jungian Studies

IAJS announces the following Scholarship Award Co-Winners for its 3rd annual Awards Program.

Best Articles 2021:

“A Jungian Approach to Psychedelic Therapy” by Marisa Swank. Published in Vol. 13(1), 2021

and

“Carl Jung and the Psychedelic Brain: An Evolutionary Model of Analytical Psychology Informed by Psychedelic Neuroscience” by Gary Clark. Published online September 9, 2021, and in Vol. 14(1), 2022

Respectfully submitted,

Erik D. Goodwyn and Robin McCoy Brooks

Editors-in-Chief, International Journal of Jungian Studies

Free access
In: International Journal of Jungian Studies
Author: Radu Umbreș

Abstract

In various professional groups, experts send rookies on absurd tasks as a joke. The fool’s errand appears in factories and hospitals, in elite schools and scout camps, among soldiers, sailors, and airmen. Why are newcomers deceived and humiliated, and why are pranks relatively similar and remarkably persistent over time? I propose that the cultural success and the recurrent features of the fool’s errand are based on evolved cognitive mechanisms activated by apprenticeship as social learning and group induction. Epistemic vigilance explains how novices are reliably deceived by experts using opaque statements erroneously perceived as pedagogical. Furthermore, coalitional psychology explains why insiders use the prank as strategic signalling of hierarchies based on epistemic asymmetry. The intersection of cognitive mechanisms and patterns of professional recruitment maintains a tradition of ritualised pranking in which insiders coordinate to humiliate newcomers to assert epistemic and coalitional dominance.

In: Journal of Cognition and Culture

Abstract

The paper explores the status of NATURE metaphors in Hungarian folk songs with respect to their representation and transmission of folk culture and worldview. Employing a Cultural Linguistic analysis, metaphors are observed from three perspectives: in relation to cultural schemas, generic-level conceptual metaphors, and experiential motivation. NATURE metaphors are to a large extent framed by cultural experience regarding their experiential basis, conceptual structure and relation with other cultural conceptualizations.

In: Journal of Cognition and Culture

Abstract

Theory of Mind is considered a person’s ability to understand his or her own mind and the minds of others, it includes a social-cognitive skill with implications for many aspects of children’s life, such as social competence, peer acceptance and early success in school. The aims of this research were to study the development of Theory of Mind and to investigate differences in the performance of Theory of Mind tasks across age groups and by gender in Saudi children. 264 children, ranging from 3–12 years of age, participated in this study and were divided into three age groups. A Theory of Mind task battery was conducted individually, and the overall results indicated age and gender differences among our participants, as girls perform better than boys, and the older age groups perform better than they younger groups.

In: Journal of Cognition and Culture

Abstract

Experimental philosophy has been engaged in many fields of philosophy and has tried to challenge philosophy from a new horizon. In this article, I have tried to examine what the role of sciences are (especially neuroscience) in altering people’s intuition about free will. Could science educate people’s philosophical intuitions? If yes, should we still rely on their intuition as a rational instrument for our philosophical questions? Do science plus cultural and social differences effect on folks’ view? In this cross-cultural research, the emphasis is mostly on recent breakthroughs on neuroscience and its impact on people’s perspective to free will. I have asked some questions about free will and determinism from two groups of Iranian and European participants. The results of this study revealed an interesting amount of cross-cultural similarities. The findings showed that people have a relatively independent view to free will and determinism. It seems that manipulating laymen’s opinion by either the idea of scientific determinism or living under pressure and challenging social conditions cannot touch their perspective. I tried to indicate that the techniques of experimental philosophy and the data offered might help us to learn more and more about the psychological processes, in the mind of the folks, that engender philosophical problems.

In: Journal of Cognition and Culture