Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 386 items for :

  • Classical Studies x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
The story of Tobit builds on various themes derived from myth, legend and folktale. Tobiah’s journey recalls Homer’s Odyssey, the suffering of the righteous brings to mind the legend of Job, and the narrative around a disgraced and then rehabilitated official evokes the story of Ahiqar. The author of Tobit seeks to exploit his readers’ knowledge of these stories in order to convey his message more effectively: he encourages them to trust in divine providence that intervenes on behalf of the faithful.
This volume, based on essays previously published in Italian, charts Tobit’s narrative sources through comparative literary analysis, firmly placing the story in the genre of the didactic and edifying religious novel.
Textual, Visual and Musical Receptions of Horace from the 15th to the 18th Century
This volume explores various perceptions, adaptations and appropriations of both the personality and the writings of Horace in the early modern age. The fifteen essays in this book are devoted to uncharted facets of the reception of Horace and thus substantially broaden our picture of the Horatian tradition. Special attention is given to the legacy of Horace in the visual arts and in music, beyond the domain of letters. By focusing on the multiple channels through which the influence of Horace was felt and transmitted, this volume aims to present instances of the Horatian heritage across the media, and to stimulate a more thorough reflection on an interdisciplinary and multi-medial approach to the exceptionally rich and variegated afterlife of Horace.

Contributors: Veronica Brandis, Philippe Canguilhem, Giacomo Comiati, Karl A.E. Enenkel, Carolin A. Giere, Inga Mai Groote, Luke B.T. Houghton, Chris Joby, Marc Laureys, Grantley McDonald, Lukas Reddemann, Bernd Roling, Robert Seidel, Marcela Slavíková, Paul J. Smith, and Tijana Žakula.
Volume 4: Islam, Europe and Beyond: A. Islam and the Middle Ages. B. Manuscripts, a Basis of Knowledge and Science, C. History of the Discipline, D. Obituaries, E. Indices
Author:
From the Greeks to the Arabs and Beyond written by Hans Daiber, is a six volume collection of Daiber’s scattered writings, journal articles, essays and encyclopaedia entries on Greek-Syriac-Arabic translations, Islamic theology and Sufism, the history of science, Islam in Europe, manuscripts and the history of oriental studies. The collection contains published (since 1967) and unpublished works in English, German, Arabic, Persian and Turkish, including editions of Arabic and Syriac texts. The publication mirrors the intercultural character of Islamic thought and sheds new light on many aspects ranging from the Greek pre-Socratics to the Malaysian philosopher Naquib al-Attas. A main concern is the interpretation of texts in print or in manuscripts, culminating in two catalogues (Vol. V and VI), which contain descriptions of newly discovered, mainly Arabic, manuscripts in all fields.
Vol. I: Graeco-Syriaca and Arabica.
Vol. II: Islamic Philosophy.
Vol. III: From God’s Wisdom to Science: A. Islamic Theology and Sufism; B. History of Science.
Vol. IV: Islam, Europe and Beyond: A. Islam and Middle Ages; B. Manuscripts – a Basis of Knowledge and Science; C. History of the Discipline; D. Obituaries; E. Indexes.
Vol. V: Unknown Arabic Manuscripts from Eight Centuries – Including one Hebrew and Two Ethiopian Manuscripts: Daiber Collection III.
Vol. VI: Arabic, Syriac, Persian and Latin Manuscripts on Philosophy, Theology, Science and Literature. Films and Offprints: Daiber Collection IV.
Author:

Abstract

The first unmetrical word of Leonidas, AP 6.4 requires emendation, not explanation. On the basis of a variant in Lucian, a new textual suggestion is made. The paper explores metrical and intertextual criteria for explaining the passage, but rejects them in favour of emendation.

Open Access
In: Mnemosyne
In: The International Journal of the Platonic Tradition
In the post-Enlightenment world, philosophy and religion have come to occupy different, even opposed, domains. But how were they related before this? What were the commonalities and dissimilarities between them? Did they already contain the seeds of their later division – or do they still share enough in common to allow meaningful conversation between them?

This new Brill series “Ancient Philosophy & Religion” provides an interdisciplinary platform for monographs, edited volumes and commentaries on this issue. It is edited by two leading scholars in the fields it brings together, George Boys-Stones (Ancient Philosophy) and George van Kooten (New Testament Studies), and is supported by an editorial board whose members are known for their work in the area. It invites scholars of ancient philosophy, Classics, early Judaism, ancient Judaism, New Testament & early Christianity, and all other relevant fields, to showcase their research on ancient philosophy and religion and to contribute to the debate.

The series’ subject matter is symbolized by its icon, used by courtesy and permission of the New Acropolis Museum in Athens. It represents a dialogue between philosophers, as shown on one of the reliefs of the funeral sacrificial table (mensa) from the “House of Proclus” on the Southern slope of the Acropolis at Athens, excavated in 1955. Dating from 350-325 BC, the reliefs of the mensa depict, after the lamentation and the farewell, the posthumous encounter of the deceased with the philosophers (1950 NAM 90).

The editors very much welcome proposals for monographs, edited volumes and even commentaries on relevant texts.

In: Horace across the Media
In: Horace across the Media
Editor:
This strand of Brill Research Perspectives addresses important themes connected with the reworking of material inherited from classical antiquity, primarily the Latin language and Latin writing conventions, but also the creative adaptation of classical traditions in other languages and media. Contributions by leading scholars from different disciplinary backgrounds will provide up-to-date overviews on the context, key texts, controversial questions, existing scholarship and avenues for further research concerning particular themes. These surveys are designed to give advanced students and scholars new to this particular area an idea of the sources, approaches and existing research, sketching scholarly history and facilitating further work.
In: Horace across the Media