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In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy

Abstract

This study investigated the lived experiences of 11 teachers who immigrated recently from four African countries to teach in Florida schools. The study explored their perceptions, expectations, lived experiences and realities during their first year of teaching in US public schools in south-west Florida. In this qualitative, phenomenological research design, using field notes and in-depth individual semistructured interviews with the immigrant teachers, three themes emerged from the thematic analysis. These were: 1) challenges facing immigrant teachers from African countries during their first year of teaching; 2) adaptation to a completely different culture and the related culture shock; and 3) support from their employers (the school district) and local communities.

In: Diaspora Studies

Abstract

The collapse of the existing world order and the rise of a counter order pose problems for the practice of negotiation and mediation as generally conceived. The transition will likely have problems overcoming issues faced in past transitions in 1812, 1919, and 1948 without a full-scale war, yet learn from these experiences. It is not too early to think about the processes and strategies needed to arrive productively at a better new system where negotiation processes can provide useful means to resolve conflicts. This article examines three levels of conflict and how conflict resolution and management approaches might be able to reestablish their capacities in a future system of international relations norms and institutions.

In: International Negotiation

Abstract

This study was conducted with the aim of assessing the needs for knowledge, skills and technology transfer in Ethiopia and the potential of the Ethiopian professional diaspora to engage with these needs. To this effect, primary data was collected through key informant and group interviews, focus group discussions with ministries, universities, referral/teaching hospitals and other sector officials, and experts, selected purposively. In addition, primary data was collected through an online survey from the professional diaspora, selected using purposive and availability sampling techniques. Secondary data was collected from previous reports, academic works and archival sources. The results of this study show that most of Ethiopia’s institutions have enormous knowledge, skills and technology needs. Correspondingly, the data indicates that there is a large professional diaspora that could address these needs and that most of the professionals have the experience, interest and intent to support their home country. Based on the findings, there should be strong institutional arrangements and collaborative actions to facilitate and enhance professional diaspora engagement.

In: Diaspora Studies
Author:

Summary

Built by the architect Louis Montoyer in Vienna between 1803 and 1808 for the Russian ambassador to Austria, Andrey Razumovsky, the famous Razumovsky Palace would become the centre of anti-Napoleonic diplomacy in the early nineteenth century and a fixture in Vienna’s lively cultural scene. This article first discusses how the ambassador used his embassy as a meeting place for formal and informal diplomacy that contributed to Russia’s positioning against Napoleon long before the Grande Armée invaded the empire. Secondly, the architectural outline of the Razumovsky Palace is linked to the different cultural functions of the embassy that underpinned and strengthened Razumovsky’s diplomatic network. The final section of the article explores the role of the Razumovsky Palace as a determinant factor in the ambassador’s decision to leave diplomatic service and remain in Vienna until his death in 1836.

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy

Abstract

The study delves into Indian cuisine in Thailand, using data from online sources that focus on content related to Indian cuisine, restaurants and grocery stores. The study applies content analysis to explore identity and the linguistic landscapes in Indian culinary practices. Indian cuisine is gaining popularity among Thais, becoming a part of their cultural heritage and showcased on digital platforms. Restaurants and grocery stores feature Indian dishes, ingredients and packaged foods, and their online platforms facilitate easy access to this cuisine. In the linguistic landscape of Indian restaurant names, bilingual names are the most prevalent, followed by monolingual names, with trilingual and quadrilingual names being less common. The potential of Indian cuisine in Thailand is evident through its introduction in convenience stores and the importation of Indian ingredients, enhancing India’s soft power and influencing economic and social dynamics in the region.

In: Diaspora Studies

Abstract

This article discusses the relationship between gendered inclusion in peace processes and Track Two peacemaking. It responds to recent policy discourse that explicitly associates linking Track Two to Track One negotiations as a way to increase the inclusion of people identifying as women (United Nations Women 2015). However, the mechanisms through which Track Two leads to more “inclusive” outcomes is complex and unclear. To understand what these mechanisms are and how they can be studied, this article draws from existing theories on transfer in Track Two and inclusion literature in peace and conflict studies to present a novel conceptual model of “linkage.” This model explores the micro-dynamics of gendered inclusivity between different tracks of dialogue engagement and how transfer is facilitated between them.

In: International Negotiation