Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 38 items for :

  • Just Published x
  • Nach Ebene eingrenzen: All x
Clear All
Series on Suicidology and Developments in the Social Scientific Study of Suicide.
Contemporary Psychoanalytic Studies (CPS) is an international scholarly book series devoted to all aspects of psychoanalytic inquiry in theoretical, philosophical, applied, and clinical psychoanalysis. Its aims are broadly academic, interdisciplinary, and pluralistic, emphasizing secularism and tolerance across the psychoanalytic domain. CPS aims to promote open and inclusive dialogue among the humanities and the social-behavioral sciences including such disciplines as philosophy, anthropology, history, literature, religion, cultural studies, sociology, feminism, gender studies, political thought, moral psychology, art, drama, and film, biography, law, economics, biology, and cognitive-neuroscience.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Contemporary Psychoanalytic Studies (CPS) is an international scholarly book series devoted to all aspects of psychoanalytic inquiry in theoretical, philosophical, applied, and clinical psychoanalysis. Its aims are broadly academic, interdisciplinary, and pluralistic, emphasizing secularism and tolerance across the psychoanalytic domain. CPS aims to promote open and inclusive dialogue among the humanities and the social-behavioral sciences including such disciplines as philosophy, anthropology, history, literature, religion, cultural studies, sociology, feminism, gender studies, political thought, moral psychology, art, drama, and film, biography, law, economics, biology, and cognitive-neuroscience.
Philosophy and Psychology publishes philosophical works on the humanistic and valuational areas of psychology, including psychotherapy, psychiatry, psychoanalysis, counseling, the anthropology of consciousness, and the life of the unconscious.
(Psychoanalyse en cultuur)
Editorial Staff: M. Franchoo, A. van Hees, H.G.C. Hillenaar, S. Houppermans, M. de Kesel, C.P. Nuijten, J.H. Scheffer, J. de Smet and T. Traversier.

Series no longer published by Editions Rodopi.
In: Multisensory Research
In: Multisensory Research
In: Multisensory Research
Author:

Abstract

The numeric colour codes used by the natural history painter Ferdinand Bauer (1760–1826) have remained resistant to interpretation. However, a practical approach, and an appreciation of historical painting methods and materials, have led to a solution to the code he devised for the Flora and Fauna Graeca. It is suggested that Bauer related the process of viewing, identifying, and conceptualising qualities of colours to the intrinsic properties of his pigments, and their sequence in his paintbox; also that his codes provided directions as to their moderation and mode of use. This study proposes that rather than being a mechanical reference system, Bauer’s code was a flexible mnemonic, reaching into the heart of artistic process.

In: Art & Perception

Abstract

While compelling illusions of self-motion (vection) can be induced purely by visual motion, they are rarely experienced immediately. This vection onset latency is thought to represent the time required to resolve sensory conflicts between the stationary observer’s visual and nonvisual information about self-motion. In this study, we investigated whether manipulations designed to increase the weightings assigned to vision (compared to the nonvisual senses) might reduce vection onset latency. We presented two different types of visual priming displays directly before our main vection-inducing displays: (1) ‘random motion’ priming displays — designed to pre-activate general, as opposed to self-motion-specific, visual motion processing systems; and (2) ‘dynamic no-motion’ priming displays — designed to stimulate vision, but not generate conscious motion perceptions. Prior exposure to both types of priming displays was found to significantly shorten vection onset latencies for the main self-motion display. These experiments show that vection onset latencies can be reduced by pre-activating the visual system with both types of priming display. Importantly, these visual priming displays did not need to be capable of inducing vection or conscious motion perception in order to produce such benefits.

Open Access
In: Multisensory Research