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Editors: Zong-qi Cai and Yuan Xingpei
Chinese Texts in the World publishes scholarly works on the reception, transmission, assimilation, and reinvention of Chinese texts in Asia, Europe, Africa, and the Americas; as well as critical studies that explore new pathways connecting Chinese texts with today’s world.
Whether Chinese texts were transmitted along the ancient Silk Road, or through modern digital technologies, such well-traveled texts hold great promise for illuminating multiple aspects of China’s cultural relations with the world. The same holds true for the examination how reconfigured Chinese texts made their way back to China, to be reconstituted as culturally polyvalent, hybrid “imports”.
Critical studies explore new ways of engaging Chinese texts with non-Chinese intellectual and cultural traditions. Such studies include, but are not limited to, a traditional textually grounded Sinological work that contains a substantive dialogue with for instance Western texts; a collaborative work by Asia-based and non-Asia-based scholars on the critical issues important to different traditions; and even a work on non-Chinese texts as long as it significantly draws insights from or engages a substantive dialogue with the Chinese traditions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals to the publisher at BRILL, Christa Stevens.
Please advise our Guidelines for a Book Proposal. Manuscripts that are published have been accepted after double-anonymous peer review.

《世界语境下的中国典籍》系列丛书包括两大类学术著作。一类是中国典籍接受史的研究,着重分析各种典籍在亚洲、欧洲、非洲和南北美洲的接受、传播、同化与再发明过程;另一类是典籍的文本研究,努力在今日的世界语境中重新诠释中国典籍,并寻求开拓与世界各种文化传统互动交流的新途径。
第一类著作注重传统意义上的典籍接受史研究,所涵盖的文献,既有沿古代丝绸之路流布的古代典籍,也有通过现代数字技术传播的论著。此类著作主要探究中国典籍在中国以外地区(包括亚洲、欧洲、非洲和美洲等地)传播、再解释、再创造、进一步传播过程中,体现了哪些不同路径。除此之外,也将分析这些经过重新加工的典籍文本怎样回到中国,然后又怎样作为多元文化的混合“舶来品”被吸纳接收,再次发展。这套丛书还将综述分析中国典籍翻译如何塑造海外各地对中国文化的看法。这套丛书意在开拓广大非专业读者、学生、学者们的视野,帮助他们在自身的文学和文化传统中发掘出未被留意的中国因素,也可能对中国文化影响形成全新理解。对于从事国学研究的学生和学者而言,这套丛书能帮助他们掌握西方学界在西方批评范式的影响下重新解释中国文献的最新趋势。
第二类著作注重广义上的文本分析研究,目标在于建立中文文本和异域知识文化传统之间新的互动关系。这种广义文本研究充分体现跨文化视野,其中包括三种学术成果:其一、能够与西方传统进行内容比较的汉学著作;其二、亚洲学者与西方的学者针对重要议题而展开的合着或;其三、能与中国学术和文化传统展开有实质意义的西方学术著作。
数千年来,丰富多彩的中文典籍文本历经万里,远赴各方,编织出一条条连接中国和世界文化的纽带。中国典籍文本在世界各地的传播过程,对于加深彼此相互了解,共同推动人类文明的进步具有极为深远的意义。我们希望,读者们能够通过阅读这套丛书,追溯中文文献的流传、以及观察当今中华文化的传播和再造的过程,深切体验激动人心的的文化探胜之旅。

Abstract

Olic is one of the only members of her generation to be raised speaking Pangcah (Amis) as her first language. Through an exploration of how one family is fighting to save this endangered Austronesian language, we analyse the challenges facing Indigenous language revitalisation in Taiwan. Particular attention is paid to the child’s transition from the home to formal—Mandarin-medium—schooling. In doing so, we draw on recent work that emphasises the agency of children in shaping family language policy (also referred to as ‘family language planning’). How do children’s experiences at school shape their—and other family members’—linguistic behaviour at home? After comparing Taiwan’s current family language policy to similar efforts elsewhere, we conclude by arguing that taking children’s agency seriously means that family language policy must be combined with changes in formal schooling as well—changes that are best implemented by the Indigenous communities themselves.

In: International Journal of Taiwan Studies

Abstract

What explains why some countries recognise Taiwan despite attempts by the People’s Republic of China to pressure some to switch recognition? We argue for moving beyond ‘dollar diplomacy’ claims to unpack additional economic influences that might help explain why some states favour Taiwan. Using cross-national evidence from all countries (1950–2016), we find multiple economic factors influencing recognition and conclude that Taiwan’s comparative success in certain regions cannot be explained by broad structural factors.

In: International Journal of Taiwan Studies
In: East Asian Science, Technology, and Medicine
Free access
In: East Asian Science, Technology, and Medicine
Commemorating the Legacy of James Legge (1815-1897)
Author: Alexander Chow
This volume explores the important legacy of Scottish missions to China, with a focus on the missionary-scholar and Protestant sinologist par excellence James Legge (1815–1897). It challenges the simplistic caricature of Protestant missionaries as Orientalizing imperialists, but also shows how the Chinese context and Chinese persons “converted” Scottish missionaries in their understandings of China and the broader world.

Scottish Missions to China brings together essays by leading Chinese, European, and North American scholars in mission history, sinology, theology, cultural and literary studies, and psychology. It calls attention to how the historic enterprise of Scottish missions to China presents new insights into Scottish-Chinese and British-Chinese relations.

Contributors are: Joanna Baradziej, Marilyn L. Bowman, Alexander Chow, Gao Zhiqiang, Joachim Gentz, David Jasper, Christopher Legge, Lauren F. Pfister, David J. Reimer, Brian Stanley, Yang Huilin, Zheng Shuhong.
Author: Zhiqiang Gao

Abstract

As the first school established by Protestant missionaries to China, the Anglo–Chinese College played an important role in the history of cultural communication between China and the West. The Anglo–Chinese College offered a broad tuition that included Christianity alongside Western and Chinese humanities and sciences, which promoted the development of modern education in China. Its printing press was the first to publish Chinese books by using metal moveable type, which modernized the publishing technology of China and opened the next phase of China’s print culture. Its translations between English and Chinese opened up China to Christian culture and Anglophone societies to Chinese classical culture. The Anglo–Chinese College built a bridge between the East and the West, not only in the time of Morrison and Legge, but in its legacy that continues to have an impact even until today.

In: Scottish Missions to China

Abstract

Single female missionaries arrived in Manchuria in 1882 and constituted more than half of the mission during the whole period of the mission activities there. This chapter shows the complexity of building the female missionaries’ view on China and their contribution to the creation of the Western image of China. First, the chapter shows how missionary candidates in Scotland were first given a vision of the Orient in the Women’s Missionary College through courses on non-Western cultures, initiated by Annie Hunter Small. Second, it discusses the further development of knowledge about China during a language course in Beijing. Such a language course not only facilitated the communication between missionaries and potential Christians, but it also opened different future career possibilities. Third, the chapter discusses how female missionaries presented an image of China to Scottish Presbyterians through missionary journals. Fourth, it presents the complexity of the relations female missionaries established on the mission field. Namely it discusses the friendship of a Scottish missionary Helen B. K. Maclean and a Chinese woman called Fragrant Tree. This was a very unusual friendship, as Fragrant Tree later moved to Scotland. All of these aspects present a variety of missionaries’ perceptions and knowledge of China, and their relations with Chinese women.

In: Scottish Missions to China
Author: Alexander Chow

Abstract

This essay will explore the so-called “term question” associated with major attempts at providing a Chinese rendering of the name of God. It will focus on two foundational missionary-scholars to China, Matteo Ricci and James Legge, and examine the different philosophical and theological contexts that ultimately resulted in the same conclusion – that is, to identify an equivalence between the Christian God and the ancient Chinese understanding of Shangdi 上帝 (“Lord on high”). This essay will also suggest that, for James Legge, this conviction offered a major rationale for producing English translations of Chinese philosophical and religious works: his monumental Chinese Classics.

In: Scottish Missions to China
Author: Joachim Gentz

Abstract

This chapter explores the understanding of the role of “the people” in James Legge’s (1815–1897) translation of the Book of Documents (1865). In comparison with other European translations of this book Legge’s readings will be explained in the context of both, the prevailing Chinese commentarial interpretations of his times as well as his own Scottish philosophical and theological background. The analysis attempts to tackle the question what exactly the factors were that inspired Legge’s readings, readings that have informed, and still continue to inform, contemporary interpretations of the Shangshu and thus contemporary discussions about Chinese traditional political culture and early Chinese approaches to human rights.

In: Scottish Missions to China