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Abstract

The present paper tackles the issue of deification in some Nag Hammadi writings in the context of other ancient strategies of (self)deification. It pays attention simultaneously to Greek and to Jewish-Christian traditions – both to mythical and philosophical contexts – trying to clarify how ancient “Gnostic” texts should be read in dialogue with surrounding culture(s). Despite the many obvious differences of conceptual assumptions in the surveyed models, an underlying typological similarity is glimpsed.

In: Gnosis: Journal of Gnostic Studies
In: Gnosis: Journal of Gnostic Studies
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In: Gnosis: Journal of Gnostic Studies
In: Gnosis: Journal of Gnostic Studies
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Abstract

The article intends to argue in favor of the dependence of Valentinus’s Fragment 1 (Clement, Strom. 2.36.2-4) on the Greek text of the Book of the Watchers. Moving from Valentinus’s recourse to specific expressions of the latter – and in particular of his “technical” use of the term φόβος (“fear”) and of the verb ἀφανίζω (“to destroy”; “to disfigure”) – the aim is to throw new light not only on the origin of Valentinus’s anthropogonic narrative, but also on the reasons and the limits of the re-use of Enochian material in the extant Valentinian production.

In: Gnosis: Journal of Gnostic Studies

Abstract

Several texts of ritual power in Coptic contain the names of four spiritual powers known in the Sethian sources as luminaries. The article explores the relations between luminaries of the Nag Hammadi works and the “magical” and related texts. Two aspects are analysed. First, the sequence of luminaries, which is highly standardised in the Nag Hammadi Sethian dossier, and deviations from this standard in other texts help assess relations with original Sethian sources. Second, the texts of ritual power portray luminaries singing and playing musical instruments. The article traces the elements of the heavenly concert already in the Sethian texts. It also presents a development of this motif under the influence of the common Christian concept of the angelic concert in heaven.

In: Gnosis: Journal of Gnostic Studies

Abstract

Most scholars currently tend to see a biblical or “Gnostic” Sophia-Eve figure as the true identity of the enigmatic feminine self-revealer pronouncing the “I am” statements in Thunder: Perfect Mind (NHC VI,2). At an early stage of research, the similarities with the aretalogies of Isis, also framed as “I am” self-predications, were pointed out, but Isis has largely been left behind as a possible identity of Thunder, because of the latter’s ambiguous status, combining both elevated and lowly epithets (whore and matron, honored and despised, etc.). The present contribution reevaluates the Egyptian background of Thunder: Perfect Mind and considers the text as a demythologized, Platonic-Stoic, performative epiphany of a self-begotten, female, divine mind, similar in many respects to the Egyptian goddess Isis-Neith. Furthermore, it will be proposed that Thunder: Perfect Mind lies behind the common source of the self-predicative passage of On the Origins of the World (NHC II,5; XIII,2) and its parallel in the Hypostasis of the Archons (NHC II,4), likely mediated by the Gospel of Eve mentioned by Epiphanius of Salamis.

In: Gnosis: Journal of Gnostic Studies
Research into the cultural contexts of the Bible has opened new ways of reading and understanding biblical texts as cultural artefacts and witnesses to particular locations, times, and circumstances. The series aims to publish latest research from the areas of cultural - including the: social sciences, scientific, economic, legal, and literary studies as well as hermeneutical approaches dealing with the production and reception of the Bible as a cultural text.
The series focusses predominantly on monographs but is also open to inter- and transdisciplinary scholarly edited volumes about the texts and contexts of individual biblical books, including work drawing from aesthetic, art, and poetry. The series accepts contributions in English, French, and German. All manuscripts are evaluated by a peer reviewing process.


Die Erforschung der kulturellen Kontexte der Bibel hat neue Wege eröffnet, biblische Texte als kulturelle Artefakte und Zeugnisse für bestimmte Orte, Zeiten und Umstände zu lesen und zu verstehen. Ziel der Reihe ist es, neueste Forschungsergebnisse aus den Bereichen Kultur – einschließlich Sozialwissenschaften, Wissenschaft, Wirtschaft, Recht und Literatur – sowie hermeneutische Ansätze zur Produktion und Rezeption der Bibel als Kulturtext zu veröffentlichen.
Die Reihe konzentriert sich überwiegend auf Monographien, ist aber auch offen für inter- und transdisziplinäre wissenschaftliche Sammelbände über die Texte und Zusammenhänge einzelner biblischer Bücher, darunter Werke aus Ästhetik, Kunst und Poesie. Akzeptiert werden Beiträge in Englisch, Französisch und Deutsch. Alle Manuskripte werden in einem Peer-Review-Verfahren bewertet.
Scholarly translation and evaluation of Biblical texts from the papyri and manuscripts of Wadi Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls, and related bibliographic, linguistic, cultural and historical aspects of ancient Judaism and early Christianity.

The series published an average of 3,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.
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Abstract

This article provides some data and remarks on the reception of the Gospel of John in the Pistis Sophia (Codex Askew), with the twofold aim to shed new light on Pistis Sophia’s use of canonized Scriptures, and to contribute to the research on the Gnostic reception of the Gospel of John. Selected Johannine references in Pistis Sophia are listed and commented on, especially those in Pistis Sophia 4.141, a dense section which is key to understanding the distinctive soteriology and Christology of this text. The analysis shows that certain passages from John play an important role for Pistis Sophia. Pistis Sophia may have elaborated its soteriology in response to criticisms from “mainstream” Christianity and in parallel with certain developments that occurred in Sethianism and Valentinianism.