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In: Indo-Iranian Journal

Abstract

The trilingual Kushan royal inscription of Dašt-i Nāwur has been the subject of scholarly controversies since the time of its first scientific publication (Fussman 1974), with different authors defending opposing views and mutually incompatible readings, in particular of the Bactrian part of the inscription (e.g. Davary & Humbach 1976; Sims-Williams & Cribb 1996; Fussman 1998). Progress in the understanding of the inscription has been hampered by inadequate photographic documentation, but also by the comparatively small amount of information on the Bactrian language that was available at the time of its first publication. A color photograph of the Bactrian inscription probably taken in 1969, which was unavailable to earlier editors, has now been made publicly accessible by the Collège de France as part of the estate of the late Gérard Fussman. This article presents a new reading of the inscription based on this photograph, diverging in many respects from earlier interpretations. It includes a response to the recent re-edition of Palunčić et al. (2023), who have also taken the new photograph into account but reached different conclusions.

In: Indo-Iranian Journal
In: Indo-Iranian Journal

Abstract

The Śrīmālādevīsiṁhanādanirdeśasūtra is preserved in toto in one Tibetan and two Chinese translations, in addition to which we have access to a fragmentary Sanskrit manuscript and a considerable number of Sanskrit quotations, contributing to a sizable amount of the text now being available in Sanskrit. The present contribution takes as its impetus a recent contribution on the sūtra and its ideas about tathāgatagarbha, offering a survey of the state of the field of study of the text in its Indian context, and several suggestions for improved understandings.

Open Access
In: Indo-Iranian Journal

Abstract

The discovery of the Adhālaka-Mahācetiya, whose name survives in various inscriptions from the site, is among the major archaeological finds in India during the 20th century. Numerous excellently preserved images and inscriptions have substantially broadened the knowledge of Buddhist art, and, perhaps more important, allow certain conclusions on the relationship of the Buddhist Saṃgha and the ruling Śātavāhana dynasty. When comparing the corpora of inscriptions within the world of images found at other previously known Buddhist sites such as Sāñcī or Nāgārjunakoṇḍa, Kanaganahalli emerges as a unique place where politics of both the Saṃgha and the Śātavāhanas are documented. The interpretation of some royal images with their inscriptions seems to allow a rare glimpse into Śātavāhana foreign policy, particularly into their relationship with their rivals, the Kṣatrapa rulers of western India. Lastly, some images such as those of Aśoka show that Mauryan rule was not forgotten at Kanaganahalli, which is very close to the site of nearby Sannati (a find spot of Aśokan edicts). At the same time these images and their very prominent position on the Adhālaka-Mahāceitya prove keen awareness and interest in events of the past by those who designed the program for decorating the monument.

In: Indo-Iranian Journal

Abstract

The Buddhist Sanskrit Saṃghāṭa-sūtra includes several longer or shorter passages in verse, mostly ślokas. Many though not all of these verse passages also appear in metrical form in the Khotanese version, which makes use of all three of the metres known from the longest Old Khotanese poem, the Book of Zambasta. The aim of the present article is to analyse these metrical passages in order to determine to what extent the treatment of the metres conforms to the practice of the Book of Zambasta. The relevant passages are therefore presented with a detailed metrical analysis as well as an English translation and brief commentary.

Open Access
In: Indo-Iranian Journal

Abstract

This survey discusses a series of achievements in comparative Indo-Iranian studies, on the occasion of the appearance of a new representative volume. The presentation of these achievements aims to trace existing and new directions of scholarly co-operation between Vedists, Avestologists, specialists in Achaemenid and Sassanian studies, as well as, more generally, between Indo-Europeanists, philologists and scholars of history of culture and religions with the aim to continue the reconstruction of Indo-Iranian sacred texts and religious practices.

In: Indo-Iranian Journal