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Studies on Society and Politics in the Bible and Ancient Near East in Honor of Daniel E. Fleming
A “Community of Peoples”: Studies on Society and Politics in the Bible and Ancient Near East in Honor of Daniel E. Fleming draws together a diverse community of scholars to honor the career of Daniel E. Fleming as a historian of the Bible and ancient Near East.

Together, these scholars participate in a dynamic historical enterprise, each one positioning themself along a Middle Eastern spatial-temporal continuum stretching from the Old Babylonian to the Persian periods. Each contributor attempts to touch a sliver of ancient history, whether a particular person or community, a text or visual image or scribal process. They do so through a diversity of methods and disciplines, which together reflect the possibilities and promises for history writing.

The Harvard Semitic Studies series publishes volumes from the Harvard Semitic Museum. Other series offered by Brill that publish volumes from the Museum include Studies in the Archaeology and History of the Levant and Harvard Semitic Monographs, https://semiticmuseum.fas.harvard.edu/publications.
Author: Stephen Waers
This book argues that Origen’s early Trinitarian theology cannot be understood apart from his engagement with monarchianism. After providing a detailed, synthetic account of monarchianism in the early third century, the book considers Origen’s response to monarchianism alongside the responses of his rough contemporaries. Specifically, the final chapters address the question of Origen’s subordinationism. When viewed in his contemporary context and not through the anachronistic lens of Nicene theology, this study argues that Origen’s so-called subordinationism was an intentional anti-monarchian polemic strategy.
Gibt es das „Corpus Johanneum“ oder gibt es gar mehrere Verfasser? Und ist die Johannesapokalypse dem sogenannten Corpus Johanneum zuzurechnen oder ist ihr theologischer Ansatz derart anders, dass sie als Fremdkörper nicht nur gegenüber den anderen johanneischen Schriften, sondern sogar als Sonderling im ganzen Neuen Testament zu gelten hat?
Auch in ihrem dritten Band des Frankfurter Neuen Testaments bleiben Stefan Alkier und Thomas Paulsen ihrer Übersetzungsmethodik treu, welche die neutestamentlichen Texte wörtlich aus dem Koine-Griechisch übersetzt. Das hat erhebliche Folgen für den Wortlaut und das Verständnis dieser Texte – so ist z.B. nicht von „Sünde“ oder „Teufel“, sondern von „Verfehlung“ und vom „Zerwerfer“ die Rede.
„Kaum einen Text glauben heutige Leserinnen und Leser so gut zu kennen wie das Johannesevangelium. Die neue Übersetzung von Stefan Alkier und Thomas Paulsen zeigt, wie falsch wir mit dieser Einschätzung liegen. Philologisch genau, erfrischend sperrig und fern von eingefahrenen Pfaden zeigt sie, wie aufregend und ungewöhnlich dieser Text wirklich ist; damit lädt sie uns dazu ein, ihn in seinem Anspruch ernst zu nehmen und uns auf seine Herausforderung einzulassen.“ Dr. Thomas Schmitz (Professor für Gräzistik an der Rheinischen Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn)
Volume Editors: Gillian B. Elliott and Anne Heath
Premodern architecture and built environments were fluid spaces whose configurations and meanings were constantly adapting and changing. The production of transitory meaning transpired whenever a body or object moved through these dynamic spaces. Whether spanning the short duration of a procession or the centuries of a building’s longue durée, a body or object in motion created in-the-moment narratives that unfolded through time and space. The authors in this volume forge new approaches to architectural studies by focusing on the interaction between monuments, artworks, and their viewers at different points in space and time.

Contributors are Christopher A. Born, Elizabeth Carson Pastan, Nicole Corrigan, Gillian B. Elliott, Barbara Franzé, Anne Heath, Philip Jacks, Divya Kumar-Dumas, Brigitte Kurmann-Schwarz, Ashley J. Laverock, Susan Leibacher Ward, Elodie Leschot, Meghan Mattsson McGinnis, Michael Sizer, Kelly Thor, and Laura J. Whatley.
Published in Open Access with the support of the Swiss National Science Foundation

Historical criticism of the Bible emerged in the context of protestant theology and is confronted in every aspect of its study with otherness: the Jewish people and their writings. However, despite some important exceptions, there has been little sustained reflection on the ways in which scholarship has engaged, and continues to engage, its most significant Other. This volume offers reflections on anti-Semitism, philo-Semitism and anti-Judaism in biblical scholarship from the 19th century to the present. The essays in this volume reflect on the past and prepare a pathway for future scholarship that is mindful of its susceptibility to violence and hatred.