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Another Way

Decentralization, Democratization and the Global Politics of Community-Based Schooling

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Edited by Rebecca Clothey and Kai Heidemann

Drawing on a variety of methodological and theoretical perspectives, the case studies compiled in Another Way: Decentralization, Democratization and the Global Politics of Community-Based Schooling offer a comparative look at how global processes of educational decentralization have both helped and hindered the development of community-based schools in local-level settings across Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas. On the one hand, the book shows how increased decentralization is often perceived as essential to assuring robust levels of democratization, community participation and social justice in education. On the other hand, it is also shown how processes of educational decentralization are often experienced in local communities as a mechanism of increased austerity, privatization and segregation.

Critical Mathematics Education

Can Democratic Mathematics Education Survive under Neoliberal Regime?

Bülent Avci

Drawing on rich ethnographic data, Critical Mathematics Education: Can Democratic Mathematics Education Survive under Neoliberal Regime? responds to ongoing discussions on the standardization in curriculum and reconceptualizes Critical Mathematics Education (CME) by arguing that despite obstructive implications of market-driven changes in education, a practice of critical mathematics education to promote critical citizenship could be implemented through open-ended projects that resonate with an inquiry-based collaborative learning and dialogic pedagogy. In doing so, neoliberal hegemony in education can be countered. The book also identifies certain limitations of critical mathematical education and suggests pedagogic and curricular strategies for critical educators to cope with these obstacles.

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Edited by Lynette Shultz and Thashika Pillay

This set of essays critically analyze global citizenship by bringing together leading ideas about citizenship and the commons in this time that both needs and resists a global perspective on issues and relations. Education plays a significant role in how we come to address these issues and this volume will contribute to ensuring that equity, global citizenship, and the common wealth provide platforms from which we might engage in transformational, collective work. The authors address the global significance of debates and struggles about belonging and abjection, solidarity and rejection, identification and othering, as well as love and hate.

Global citizenship, as a concept and a practice, is now being met with a dangerous call for insularism and a protracted ethno-nationalism based on global economic imperialism, movements for white supremacy and miscegenation, various forms of religious extremism, and identity politics, but which antithetically, also comes from the anti-globalization movement focused on building strong, sustainable communities. We see a taming of citizens that contributes to the taming of what we understand as the public sphere and the commons, the places of cultural, natural, and intellectual resources that are shared and not privately owned. The work of global citizenship education is distinguishable from the processes of a deadly globalization or destruction of the world that responds to the interlocking issues that make life on the planet precarious for human and non-humans everywhere (albeit an unequal precarity).

This book is an invitation into a conversation that explores and makes visible some of the hidden chasms of oppression and inequity in the world. It is meant to provoke both argument and activism as we work to secure common spaces that are broadly life-sustaining.

Contributors are: Ali A. Abdi, Sung Kyung Ahn, Chouaib El Bouhali, Xochilt Hernández, Carrie Karsgaard, Marlene McKay, Michael O’Sullivan, Christina Palech, Karen Pashby, Karen J. Pheasant-Neganigwane, Thashika Pillay, Ashley Rerrie, Grace J. Rwiza, Toni Samek, Lynette Shultz, Harry Smaller, Crain Soudien, Derek Tannis, and Irene Friesen Wolfstone.

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Edited by Keiichi Ogawa and Mikiko Nishimura

Achieving Universal Primary Education (UPE) has received considerable attention since the early 1950s. The concept of universal education is, however, not well defined and is used to mean many different things to different people. This book contains a five-year research work conducted by a group of African and Japanese researchers who have developed an equal partnership and network to review the expansion of primary education, some policies prompting the free primary education intervention, and the challenges of implementation based on the case study of two districts in four countries, namely, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, and Uganda. The first part discusses issues related to administrative, financial, and perceptive issues related to UPE policies in each country case, followed by the second part that focuses on quality of education and UPE policies. The book contains various lessons learnt and implications for future education policies in developing countries.

Educational Internationalisation

Academic Voices and Public Policy

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Edited by Jennifer Olson, Heidi Biseth and Guillermo Ruiz

This book is part of the Sense Publishers series emerging from the 2013 WCCES XV World Congress in Buenos Aires (Series Editors Suzanne Majhanovich and Allan Pitman). The Congress Theme of New Times, New Voices provided the broad frame for the conference and the series of volumes, including this one, which contains research contributions focusing on educational internationalisation. Ever since the early days of international and comparative inquiry in education, the idea that policy and practice might be borrowed or transferred from one location to another has been a continuing theme. Several studies included in this volume focus on the activities of governments, the interactions between supranational organisations and states and the role of private and civil society actors in educational internationalisation.
The chapters in this volume explore how internationalisation is carried out in various educational levels and through new or expanding policies and practices. Moreover, the chapters represent diverse research perspectives and geographical regions. More specifically, they examine issues pertaining to: (1) changes in the academic profession, (2) responses to the European Bologna Process and European perspectives on internationalisation, (3) political and institutional interventions that shape educational policy agendas, (4) children’s rights and teacher education in Latin America, and (5) the voices of Roma interest groups. Taken together, these chapters explore the relationships between academic voices and those of international organisations, as well as how national policy makers interpret contrasting international discourses, and political and social factors that influence educational internationalisation processes.

Die offene Frage der Mündigkeit

Studien zur Politizität der Bildung

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Carsten Bünger

The Burden of Educational Exclusion

Understanding and Challenging Early School Leaving in Africa

Edited by Jacques Zeelen, Dorothy Nampota, Josje van der Linden and Maximiano Ngabirano

‘School was nothing but a taboo for me’ concludes Johannah, a young South African, after recounting her life story. Johannah is one of the early school leavers who features in this book. Figures on participation in education in Africa show that despite government agreements and policies developed under the banner of Education for All this remains a remote goal. In several countries, programmes on Universal Primary Education have improved access to education, but do those who enter school remain there until they have reached a suitable level? Do they acquire enough competences at primary and secondary school to survive the tough daily life in sub-Saharan countries? What happens to children and young adults who leave school early? What measures can be taken to prevent them from doing so?
This book is based on research carried out in Eastern and Southern Africa by scholars from Africa and the Netherlands who cooperated within the framework of the ESLA project. The contributions to this book reflect the exchanges and discussions which took place in this research group, initiated by staff of Mzumbe University in Tanzania, Uganda Martyrs University and the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. The group aims to go beyond figures and uncover the causes, effects and stories of the young people involved, as well as explore promising new strategies with which to address their needs. As early school leaving is not exclusively an African problem, a contribution on the Dutch situation is also included.
The book concludes that exclusion from education has far-reaching effects, not only for the young people involved, but also for the society in which they live. The burden of educational exclusion should be the joint responsibility of developing and developed countries. The authors hope the book will contribute not only to a greater understanding of the phenomenon of early school leaving, but also challenge it in terms of developing policies and programmes that can prevent educational exclusion and support those who already find themselves in such a situation.

Challenging Transitions in Learning and Work

Reflections on Policy and Practice

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Edited by Peter Sawchuk and Alison Taylor

In the past two decades, advanced capitalist countries have seen sustained growth in labour market participation along with a growth in the number of jobs workers tend to have in their working lives. Over a slightly longer period we also see that participation in both formal educational attainment and a range of non-compulsory learning/training has grown. However, labour market discrimination based on gender, age, disability and race/ethnicity remains a serious issue in virtually all OECD countries.
‘Challenging Transitions in Learning and Work’ presents a critical and expansive exploration of learning and work transitions within this context. These transitions are challenging for those enmeshed in them and need to be actively challenged through the critical research reported. The impetus for this volume, its conceptual framing, and much of the research emerges from the team of Canadian researchers who together completed case study and survey projects within the ‘Work and Lifelong Learning’ (WALL) network. The authors include leading scholars with established international reputations as well as emerging researchers with fresh perspectives. This volume will appeal to researchers and policy-makers internationally with an interest in educational studies and industrial sociology.

Edited by Deborah Osberg and Gert Biesta

Complexity theory has become a major influence in discussions about the theory and practice of education. This book focuses on a question which so far has received relatively little attention in such discussions, which is the question of the politics of complexity. The chapters in this book engage with this question in a range of different ways. Whereas some contributions make a case for the promotion of complexity in education, others focus more explicitly on questions concerning the reduction of complexity in and through education. The chapters do so using theoretical, historical and empirical arguments, paying attention to a range of different educational settings (including early childhood education, school education, post-compulsory education, lifelong learning and work-based education), and focusing on different aspects of these practices (such as curriculum, pedagogy, assessment, architecture, and management). Taken together the chapters not only reveal the potential of complexity for engaging with questions about the politics of education in new and different ways. They also provide examples of a more reflexive engagement with the politics of complexity in education itself.

Sue L.T. McGregor

This book shares a collection of novel ways to re-conceptualize and envision the moral imperatives of consumption, thereby providing invigorating insights for future dialogue and intellectual and social action. It privileges a consumer moral leadership imperative, which augments the conventional management imperatives of sustainability, ethics, simplicity and environmental integrity. There are 13 chapters, including first-ever discussions of non-violent consumption, transdisciplinary consumption, consumer moral adulthood, integral informed consumption, conscious and mindful consumption, biomimicry informed consumption, and consumer moral leadership as a new intellectual construct. The book strives to intellectually and philosophically challenge and reframe the act, culture and ideology of consuming. The intent is to foster new hope that leads to differently informed activism and to provocative research, policy, entrepreneurial and educational initiatives that favour the human condition, the collective human family and interconnected integrity. This book strives to move consumers from managing for efficiency to leading for moral efficacy, the ability to use their existing moral capacities to deal with moral challenges in the marketplace. The very core of what it means to be a morally responsible member of the human family is challenged and re-framed through the lens of consumer moral leadership.