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Edited by Anthony Grenville and Andrea Reiter

Political Exile and Exile Politics in Britain after 1933 brings together a number of scholarly essays that shed light on a hitherto neglected aspect of the experience of German and Austrian refugees in Britain – their political activities in their country of refuge and how these were viewed (and used) by the British government and its Secret Service.
This volume does not claim to be exhaustive. However, it offers a range of case studies on various issues concerning political exile and the possibility of the continuation of political engagement in exile, even in the internment camps. Most of the contributions in this volume are based on archival material that has never been used before possibly because, like the MI5 files on Karl Otten which have only recently been declassified, researchers have not been able to access them.
Predictably, the majority of these essays show the political activities of men. The efforts of women which constitute the focus of three contributions therefore are all the more noteworthy.

Von der nationalen zur internationalen Literatur

Transkulturelle deutschsprachige Literatur und Kultur im Zeitalter globaler Migration

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Edited by Helmut Schmitz

Seit ungefähr zwei Jahrzehnten gibt es in der deutschen Kulturlandschaft, im literarischen und akademischen Betrieb eine zunehmende Sensibilisierung für den Beitrag von Schriftstellern und Schriftstellerinnen zur Gegenwartsliteratur, deren Muttersprache nicht, oder nicht nur, deutsch ist und die nach Deutschland immigriert oder Kinder bzw. Enkel von Immigranten sind. Dieser Band präsentiert eine Reihe von Aufsätzen zur zeitgenössischen transnationalen deutschsprachigen Literatur und Kultur. Neben Aufsätzen zu einzelnen Schriftstellern (Imran Ayata, Yadé Kara, Feridun Zaimoğlu, Rafik Schami, Terézia Mora, Libuše Moníková und Ilija Trojanow) werden auch begriffliche und thematische Fragen angesprochen. Unterteilt in die Sektionen Historisches, Begriffliche Fragen, Deutsch-türkische, Ost- und südosteuropäische und Deutsch-jüdische Literatur, sucht der Band der Vielfalt und Heterogenität der transkulturellen deutschsprachigen Literatur gerecht zu werden. Dabei richtet sich der Band sowohl an Fachkollegen, als auch an Studenten.

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Edited by Charmian Brinson and Marian Malet

This volume focuses on a previously under-researched area, namely exile in and from Czechoslovakia in the years prior to the Second World War as well as during the wartime and post-war periods. The study considers, firstly, the refugees from Germany and Austria who fled to Czechoslovakia during the 1930s; secondly, the refugees from Czechoslovakia, both German and Czech-speaking, who arrived in Britain in or around 1938 as refugees from Fascism; and thirdly, those who fled from Communism in 1948. From a variety of perspectives, the book examines the refugees’ activities and achievements in a range of fields, both on a collective and an individual basis. The volume will be of interest to scholars and students of twentieth century history, politics and cultural studies as well as those involved in Central European Studies and Exile Studies. It will also appeal to a general readership with an interest in Britain and Europe in the 1930s and 1940s.

A Nation of Victims?

Representations of German Wartime Suffering from 1945 to the Present

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Edited by Helmut Schmitz

The re-emergence of the issue of wartime suffering to the fore of German public discourse represents the greatest shift in German memory culture since the Historikerstreit of the 1980s. The (international) attention and debates triggered by, for example, W.G. Sebald’s Luftkrieg und Literatur, Günter Grass’s Im Krebsgang, Jörg Friedrich’s Der Brand testify to a change in focus away from the victims of National Socialism to the traumatic experience of the ‘perpetrator collective’ and its legacies. The volume brings together German, English and Israeli literary and film scholars and historians addressing issues surrounding the representation of German wartime suffering from the immediate post-war period to the present in literature, film and public commemorative discourse. Split into four sections, the volume discusses the representation of Germans as victims in post-war literature and film, the current memory politics of the Bund der Vertriebenen, the public commemoration of the air raids on Hamburg and Dresden and their representation in film, photography, historiography and literature, the impact and reception of W.G. Sebald’s Luftkrieg und Literatur, the representation of flight and expulsion in contemporary writing, the problem of empathy in representations of Germans as victims and the representation of suffering and National Socialism in Oliver Hirschbiegel’s film Der Untergang.

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Edited by Ludger Scherer and Rolf Lohse

Zwischen dem Komischen und dem Avantgardistischen gibt es Parallelen, die bislang kaum von der Forschung gewürdigt wurden, in diesem Band aber erstmals im Mittelpunkt stehen. In 19 Beiträgen werden strukturelle, konzeptionelle und personelle Beziehungen zwischen den beiden scheinbar gegensätzlichen Phänomenen an repräsentativen Beispielen aus der französischen, italienischen, spanischen, deutschen und niederländischen Literatur vom Ende des 19. bis zum Ende des 20. Jahrhunderts untersucht. Die Beiträge reichen von der italienischen Scapigliatura über Futurismus, Dadaismus, Expressionismus und Surrealismus bis hin zu Pataphysik, Oulipo und neoavantgardistischen Texten. Auf diese Weise kommen Autoren, Bewegungen und Aspekte, die bisher zu wenig beachtet wurden, in den Blick, bekannte erscheinen in neuem Licht, und auch die beiden Begriffe Avantgarde und Komik gewinnen an Schärfe. Denn weder ist der avantgardistische Impuls auf die sogenannten historischen Avantgarden zu beschränken noch verbleiben komische Verfahren im Harmlosen: Beide überschreiten Grenzen, die es ständig neu zu reflektieren gilt.

Rifts in Time and in the Self

The Female Subject in Two Generations of East German Women Writers

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Cheryl Dueck

The fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989 marked the end of East Germany’s socialist regime and a new beginning for a unified German Federal Republic. Cultural historians agree that the event caused one of the deepest rifts in time and thinking seen by an entire generation of Germans—a rift that left its mark on the psyche of every citizen, challenging notions of the personal and the political, and crashing traditional understandings of the individual and the collective self.
In this bold rethinking of the question, Cheryl Dueck goes beyond the social, political, and psychological discourses that Marx and Freud, Foucault and Lacan viewed as the initiators of modern (socialist) identities to explore the literature and discourse of the quest for unity of the female subject. Reading such authors as Christa Wolf, Brigitte Reimann, Helga Königsdorf, and Helga Schubert, Dueck traces the striking fissures which run through time and through the female self, haunting women within the socialist project.
The book shows how two generations of women writers have struggled consciously and systematically in their letters, aesthetic writings, and literary production to create a new language to express their own sense of self within a restrictive socialist and patriarchal system. Rifts in Time and in the Self offers an unprecedented look at the reconceptualizations of the female subject during several phases of GDR history, and women writers’ persistent attempt to carve out spaces of identity and community.

Writing against Boundaries

Nationality, Ethnicity and Gender in the German-speaking Context

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Edited by Barbara Kosta and Helga Kraft

Writing against Boundaries. Nationality, Ethnicity and Gender in the German-speaking Context presents a series of essays by prominent scholars who critically explore the intersection of nation and subjectivity, the production of national identities, and the tense negotiation of multiculturalism in German-speaking countries. By looking at a wide spectrum of texts that range from Richard Wagner's operas to Hans Bellmer's art, and to literature by Aras Ören, Irene Dische, Annette Kolb, Elizabeth Langgässer, Karin Reschke, Christa Wolf, to contemporary German theater by Bettina Fless, Elfriede Jelinek, Anna Langhoff, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, and to Monika Treut's films, the volume explores the intersection of gender, ethnicity and nation and examines concepts of national culture and the foreigner or so-called 'other.' Focusing on such issues as immigration, xenophobia, gender, and sexuality, the volume looks at narratives that sustain the myth of a homogeneous nation, and those that disrupt it. It responds to a growing concern with borders and identity in a time in which borders are tightening as the demands of globalization increase.

After the GDR

New Perspectives on the Old GDR and Young Länder

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Edited by Laurence McFalls and Lothar Probst

This volume represents the efforts of fifteen scholars from Europe and North America to work through the complex and sometimes compromising past and the current struggles that together define eastern German identity, society, and politics ten years after unification. Their papers offer an exemplary illustration of the variety of disciplinary methods and new source materials on which established and younger scholars can draw today to further differentiated understanding of the old GDR and the young Länder. In a volume that will interest students of German history, cultural studies and comparative politics, the authors show how utopian ideals quickly degenerated into a dictatorship that provoked the everyday resistance at all levels of society that ultimately brought the regime to its demise. They also suggest how the GDR might live on in memory to shape the emerging varieties of postcommunist politics in the young states of the Federal Republic and how the GDR experience might inspire new practices and concepts for German society as a whole. Most importantly, the papers here testify to the multidisciplinary vitality of a field whose original object of enquiry disappeared over a decade ago.

Essays on the Song Cycle and on Defining the Field

Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Word and Music Studies at Ann Arbor, MI, 1999

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Edited by Walter Bernhart and Werner Wolf

This volume assembles twelve interdisciplinary essays that were originally presented at the Second International Conference on Word and Music Studies at Ann Arbor, MI, in 1999, a conference organized by the International Association for Word and Music Studies (WMA).
The contributions to this volume focus on two centres of interest. The first deals with general issues of literature and music relations from culturalist, historical, reception-aesthetic and cognitive points of view. It covers issues such as conceptual problems in devising transdisciplinary histories of both arts, cultural functions of opera as a means of reflecting postcolonial national identity, the problem of verbalizing musical experience in nineteenth-century aesthetics and of understanding reception processes triggered by musicalized fiction.
The second centre of interest deals with a specific genre of vocal music as an obvious area of word and music interaction, namely the song cycle. As a musico-literary genre, the song cycle not only permits explorations of relations between text and music in individual songs but also raises the question if, and to what extent words and/or music contribute to creating a larger unity beyond the limits of single songs. Elucidating both of these issues with stimulating diversity the essays in this section highlight classic nineteenth- and twentieth-century song cycles by Franz Schubert, Robert Schumann, Hugo Wolf, Richard Strauss and Benjamin Britten and also include the discussion of a modern successor of the song cycle, the concept album as part of today’s popular culture.