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Volume Editor: Keping Yu
Translator: Frances Chan
Volume Editors: Sofia Gaspar and Irene Rodrigues
This book brings together works by specialists from various areas of the social sciences to reflect on the presence of China in Portugal and in Portuguese-speaking territories. From the first Chinese coolies that migrated to the former Portuguese colonies more than 100 years ago, to the current investments along the Belt and Road Initiative, we take the pulse of this historic, social, political and economic presence and flows, that continues to renew and reinvent itself in the face of the challenges of contemporaneity.
Asian Canadians—whether immigrant, international students, naturalized, native-born, or other—are hampered in their exploration and articulation of self by the dearth of critical writing both for them, and by them. Despite the influx of Asian students and their inflated tuition rates to Canadian postsecondary institutions, they are strikingly underrepresented in the literature of the academy. Critical theory focusing on Asian identity, anti-Asian racism, and the Asian-Canadian experience is limited, or presented as an artifact of the past.

Across the globe—but particularly in the English-speaking West—the internationalization of higher education continues its upward trend. 2017 data from the Canadian Bureau for International Education positioned Canada as the fourth-leading destination for international students seeking post-secondary education. The fact that the vast majority of international students at Canadian colleges and universities come from Asia has been well documented in domestic media, but the lived experiences and perspectives of these transnational individuals have not. This edited collection provides much-needed theorizing of Asian-Canadian lived experiences, focusing on such themes as: multiculturalism, diversity, race, culture, agency, education, community activism, citizenship, identity, model minority myths, gender, colonization, neoliberalism, and others.

Contributors include: Sarah Alam, Syed Fahad Ali, Wallis Caldoza, Valerie G. Damasco, Grace Garlow, Allison Lam, Kailan Leung, Juanna Nguyen, Dionisio Nyaga, Jasmine Pham, Vania Soepriatna, Tika Ram Thapa and Rose Ann Torres.
Twelve Lectures on Social Contradictions in China
Author: Zhongmin WU
Translator: Jun HE
There are twelve lectures in this book. The theoretical section addresses the concept of social contradictions, their various forms and influencing factors, their dual functions and how they aid social development. The author then compares the characteristics of contradictions in traditional and modern society, and analyzes how their special laws have become applicable during periods of transition in contemporary Chinese society. He interprets the contradictions between the public and officials, the rich and the poor, and labor and capital. He also looks at social contradictions in the internet era. He finally analyzes the possibility of social unrest in China and proposes how to actively and effectively deal with social contradictions. His study of social contradictions is of theoretical and practical significance.
Volume Editors: Fenggang Yang, Jonathan Pettit, and Chris White
This volume is a collection of studies of various religious groups in the changing religious markets of China: registered Christian congregations, unregistered house churches, Daoist masters, and folk-religious temples. The contributing authors are emerging Chinese scholars who apply and respond to Fenggang Yang’s tricolor market theory of religion in China: the red, black, and gray markets for legal, illegal, and ambiguous religious groups, respectively. These ethnographic studies demonstrate a great variety within the gray market, and fluidity across different markets. The volume concludes with Fenggang Yang reviewing the introduction of the religious market theories to China and formally responding to major criticisms of these theories.
In China, strong economic growth over the past four decades, accelerated urbanisation and multiple inequalities between urban and rural worlds have driven the escalation of internal and international migrations. The internal migration of workers represents a unique phenomenon since the reform and opening of China. Less-qualified young migrants are living in subaltern conditions and young migrant graduates have strongly internalised the idea of being the "heroes" of the new Chinese society in a context of emotional capitalism. But internal and international migrations intersect and intertwine, young internal and international migrants from China produce economic cosmopolitanisms in Chinese society and through top-down, bottom-up and intermediary globalisation. The young Chinese migrant incarnates the Global Individual, what we labeled here as the Compressed Individual.
Editor: SHAO Binhong
The Impact of Innovation on Globalization is the eighth volume of the series China in the World. Like other volumes in the series, this volume includes views of leading Chinese scholars on China’s relations with other countries and regions in the world. In view of the theme of “globalization” in this volume, the contributors in this volume pay attention to how the Covid-19 pandemic impacts and challenges globalization, especially how it affects China, the United States, and their mutual relations.
However, this is not to say that some issues surrounding globalization—the orientation and interrelationship of political and economic decision-making in China and the United States—have emerged only after the outbreak of the pandemic. The volume focuses on some long-term trends and innovations, from the past to the future. Chapter 2, “Globalization, Convergence, and China’s Economic Development,” describes the patterns of globalization. Chapter 3, “The Rejuvenation of the Chinese Nation is Unstoppable,” talks about views on current economic and financial issues. Chapter 4, “Reconstructing Global Industrial Chains under the Pandemic, and China’s Response,” discusses China’s pivotal position in global supply chains. Besides answering these basic questions, the book investigates other important issues, such as Global Value Chains, Changes in the International Order, Changes in the International Economic Landscape, WTO Reform, China’s Foreign Economic and Trade Strategies, Towards a Climate Resilience Society, Identity Politics, and the AI “Revolution”.
The Narratives of Illusion and Suffering
Author: Simeng Wang
This research employs the narrative of mental suffering as a prism through which to study Chinese migration in France. It provides new analytical angles and new perspectives on the paradoxical existence and conditions of the migrants, and traces the social links between individuals and societies, objectivity and subjectivity, the real and the imaginary.

The ethnographic survey in this study is situated in the context of the transformation of Chinese society over the last forty years. Dr. Wang deconstructs the stereotypes of Chinese people, demonstrates the dynamics of social mobilities and heterogeneous living conditions of Chinese migrants, who experience and narrate happiness as well as pain, joy as well as sorrow, and hope as well as despair.

The transversal approach used to analyse the heterogeneity within an ethnic group will be of interest to scholars of migration studies in general.
Volume Editor: Yunxiang Yan
Chinese Families Upside Down offers the first systematic account of how intergenerational dependence is redefining the Chinese family. The authors make a collective effort to go beyond the conventional model of filial piety to explore the rich, nuanced, and often unexpected new intergenerational dynamics. Supported by ethnographic findings from the latest field research, novel interpretations of neo-familism address critical issues from fresh perspectives, such as the ambivalence in grandparenting, the conflicts between individual and family interests, the remaking of the moral self in the face of family crises, and the decisive influence of the Chinese state on family change. The book is an essential read for scholars and students of China studies in particular and for those who are interested in the present-day family and kinship in general.