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Images of Miraculous Healing in the Early Modern Netherlands explores the ways in which paintings and prints of biblical miracles shaped viewers’ approaches to physical and sensory impairments and bolstered their belief in supernatural healing and charitable behavior. Drawing upon a vast range of sources, Barbara Kaminska demonstrates that visual imagery held a central place in premodern disability discourses, and that the exegesis of New Testament miracle stories determined key attitudes toward the sick and the poor. Addressed to middle-class collectors, many of the images analyzed in this study have hitherto been neglected by art historians.
This is the first biography of Barbara of Cilli (1392-1451), Hungarian, Roman-German and Bohemian queen through her marriage to King and later Emperor Sigismund of Luxembourg (1368-1437). While Emperor Sigismund has enjoyed substantial historical attention, Barbara has remained in his shadow, despite her significant political, economic, and cultural influence.

Barbara’s image is still preserved today as the "Black Queen" or the "German Messalina". She has been transformed into a mystical or even demonic figure in folklore – a prime example of the creation and functioning of historical stereotypes – yet as a historical figure she emerges as an influential and exceptional queen.
Volume Editors: Olivier Giraud and Michel Lallement
Decentering Comparative Analysis in a Globalizing World aims to go beyond the traditional criticism in comparative analysis. It wants to shed new light on the question of comparing as a form of categorizing. In this perspective, three relevant dimensions to question the naturalized categories of comparison are mobilized: ethnocentrism, the nation, and academic disciplines. Based on original empirical work, the volume proposes to use comparative categories by mixing and shifting the analytical perspectives. It brings together contributions that come to terms with the historicity of the comparative method in the social sciences. It eventually deals with the key issue of comparability of various cases, in the enlarged context of a globalizing world.

Contributors are: Anna Amelina, Camille Boullier, Catherine Cavalin, Serge Ebersold, Andreas Eckert, Mouhamedoune Abdoulaye Fall, Isabel Georges, Olivier Giraud, Aïssa Kadri, Wiebke Keim, Michel Lallement, Marie Mercat-Bruns, Luis Felipe Murillo, Kiran Klaus Patel, Léa Renard, Ferruccio Ricciardi, Paul-André Rosental, Pablo Salazar-Jaramillo, Stéphanie Tawa-Lama, Nikola Tietze, Tania Toffanin, Michel Vincent and Bénédicte Zimmermann.
Volume Editor: Richard B. Allen
Slavery and Bonded Labor in Asia, 1250–1900 is the first collection of studies to focus on slavery and related forms of labor throughout Asia. The 15 chapters by an international group of scholars assess the current state of Asian slavery studies, discuss new research on slave systems in Asia, identify avenues for future research, and explore new approaches to reconstructing the history of slavery and bonded labor in Asia and, by extension, elsewhere in the globe. Individual chapters examine slavery, slave trading, abolition, and bonded labor in places as diverse as Ceylon, China, India, Korea, the Mongol Empire, the Philippines, the Sulu Archipelago, and Timor in local, regional, pan-regional, and comparative contexts.

Contributors are: Richard B. Allen, Michael D. Bennett, Claude Chevaleyre, Jeff Fynn-Paul, Hans Hägerdal, Shawna Herzog, Jessica Hinchy, Kumari Jayawardena, Rachel Kurian, Bonny Ling, Christopher Lovins, Stephanie Mawson, Anthony Reid, James Francis Warren, Don J. Wyatt, Harriet T. Zurndorfer.
Author: Jörg Oberste
Between 1150 and 1350, Paris grew from a mid-sized episcopal see in Europe to the largest metropolis on the continent. The population rose during these two centuries from approximately 30,000 to over 250,000 inhabitants. The causes and consequences of this demographic explosion are thoroughly examined for the first time in this book by Jörg Oberste.

As it turns out, the management of urban space is key to understanding one of the most dynamic processes of urbanisation in pre-modern Europe: Who decides on the new construction of streets, squares, and houses? From whence does the multitude of new inhabitants come? What are the consequences of this massive wave of immigration on urban society, the economy, and the keeping of the peace? What kind of self-understanding evolves from the heterogeneous construct of the rapidly growing city, and what kind of external perceptions is late medieval Paris able to create? When does the myth of the “magical city on the Seine” (Heinrich Heine), perpetuated to the present day, come to be born? Oberste’s extensive investigation of the pertinent and wide-ranging medieval sources sheds new light on these and other questions related to the significant expansion of the City of Lights in the Middle Ages.
Editor / Translator: Barbara C. Allen
The Russian Workers’ Opposition in 1919-21 advocated trade union management of the Soviet economy and worker dominance of the Russian Communist Party’s leading bodies. The Workers’ Opposition in the Russian Communist Party: Documents, 1919-30 comprises articles, speeches, theses, memoranda, protocols, resolutions, letters, diary entries, and other documents pertaining to the activity of the Workers’ Opposition group during its existence and of its individual former members after the group dissolved and until its key members ceased their participation in dissenting political activities by 1930. Most of the documents in the collection have never before been published in English and many have not been published in Russian. It will appeal to those who study Marxism, trade unions, and Soviet history.