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Free Soil and Fugitive Slaves from the U.S. South to Mexico’s Northeast, 1803–1861
Author: Thomas Mareite
While the literature on slave flight in nineteenth-century North America has commonly focused on fugitive slaves escaping to the U.S. North and Canada, Conditional Freedom provides new insights on the social and political geography of freedom and slavery in nineteenth-century North America by exploring the development of southern routes of escape from slavery in the U.S. South and the experiences of self-emancipated slaves in the U.S.–Mexico borderlands. In Conditional Freedom, Thomas Mareite offers a social history of U.S. refugees from slavery, and provides a political history of the clash between Mexican free soil and the spread of slavery west of the Mississippi valley during the nineteenth-century.
This volume fundamentally revises our understanding of the development of modern New York, focusing on elite domestic architecture within the contexts of social history, urban planning, architecture, interior design, and adaptive reuse. Featuring new archival research and previously unpublished photographs and architectural plans, contributions from emerging and establishing scholars, art historians and practitioners offer a multi-faceted analysis of major figures such as James B. Duke, Horace Trumbauer, Julian Francis Abele, Robert Venturi, and Richard Kelly, with fresh perspectives on domestic spaces, urban forms, and social reforms that shaped early-twentieth century New York into the modern city we know today.
American Moravians and their Neighbors, 1772-1822, edited by Ulrike Wiethaus and Grant McAllister, offers an interdisciplinary examination of Moravian Americanization in the Early Republic. With an eye toward the communities that surrounded Moravian settlements in the Southeast, the contributors examine cultural, social, religious, and artistic practices of exchange and imposition framed by emergent political structures that encased social privilege and marginalization.
Through their multidisciplinary approach, the authors convincingly argue that Moravians encouraged assimilation, converged with core values and political forces of the Early Republic, but also contributed uniquely Moravian innovations. Residual, newly dominant, and increasingly subjugated discourses among Moravians, other European settlers, Indigenous nations and free and enslaved communities of color established the foundations of a new Moravian American identity.

Contributors include: Craig D. Atwood, David Bergstone, David Blum, Stewart Carter, Martha B. Hartley, Geoffrey R. Hughes, Winelle Kirton-Roberts, Grant P. McAllister, Thomas J. McCullough, Paul Peucker, Charles D. Rodenbough, John Ruddiman, Jon F. Sensbach, Larry E. Tise, Riddick Weber, and Ulrike Wiethaus.
Author: Pia Wiegmink
Abolitionist Cosmopolitanism redefines the potential of American antislavery literature as a cultural and political imaginary by situating antislavery literature in specific transnational contexts and highlighting the role of women as producers, subjects, and audiences of antislavery literature. Pia Wiegmink draws attention to locales, authors, and webs of entanglement between texts, ideas, and people. Perceived through the lens of gender and transnationalism, American antislavery literature emerges as a body of writing that presents profoundly reconfigured literary imaginations of freedom and equality in the United States prior to the Civil War.
Already in 1854, Henry David Thoreau had declared in Walden that “Most men appear never to have considered what a house is” (225). Like Thoreau, many other renowned American writers have considered what houses are and, particularly, what houses do, and they have created fictional dwellings that function not only as settings, but as actual central characters in their works. The volume is specifically concerned with the structure, the organization, and the objects inside houses, and argues that the space defined by rooms and their contents influences the consciousness, the imaginations, and the experiences of the humans who inhabit them.

Contributors are: Cristina Alsina Rísquez, Rodrigo Andrés, Vicent Cucarella-Ramon, Arturo Corujo, Mar Gallego, Ian Green, Michael Jonik, Wyn Kelley, Cynthia Lytle, Carme Manuel, Paula Martín-Salván, Elena Ortells, Eva Puyuelo-Ureña, Dolores Resano, and Cynthia Stretch.
The European Association for American Studies Series
Series Editor: Marek Paryż
European Perspectives on the United States: The European Association for American Studies Series is published under the auspices and with the editorial involvement of the European Association for American Studies. This peer-reviewed series provides a broad reflection of the state of American Studies in Europe. While the series prioritizes academic works that accentuate the importance of transnationality and interdisciplinarity in the study of the United States, it aims to properly recognize the diverse and relevant European achievements in the main disciplines of American Studies, to include but not limited to literary studies, cultural studies, film and media studies, history, and the social sciences. Benefiting from the varied professional alignments of European Americanists, European Perspectives on the United States will initiate new directions of dialogue in American Studies by opening the field to voices from across nations and continents.

European Perspectives on the United States has value for a wide and diverse range of academics and postdoctoral and postgraduate research students representing an array of disciplines within the humanities and social sciences. The series is intended to serve as an inclusive resource for researchers and readers with a multi-/interdisciplinary focus in American Studies. Given the central importance of American Studies in relation to key questions of global import relating to climate, migration, borders, Black Lives Matter, #MeToo, terrorism, and many other topics, the series serves as a much-needed forum to foster dialogue and cooperation within and between spheres of inquiry and activity.

Manuscripts should be at least 80,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations and other visual material. The editors will consider proposals for original monographs, edited collections, translations, and critical primary source editions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Debbie de Wit.

Authors will find general proposal guidelines at the Brill Author Gateway.
Matteo Battistini offers a critical deconstruction of the fetish that social sciences have forged for legitimising American capitalism. The intellectual history of the middle class provides the social history of a political concept that assumes a specific scientific content acquiring an ideological centrality that has no equal in European history. The social sciences have freed the middle class from its historical relationship with work in an attempt to emancipate it from the tension into which it was continually dragged by class conflict. In this way, the social sciences overturn the image of opposing forces of labour and capital into a consensual order whereby capitalism and democracy would coexist without tension.

This book was originally published as Storia di un feticcio. La classe media americana dalle origini alla globalizzazione, by Mimesis, Milan, Italy, 2020.