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Author: Brian Madigan
Andrea Fulvio’s Illustrium imagines and the Beginnings of Classical Archaeology is a study of the book acknowledged by contemporaries to be the first attempt (1517) to publish artifacts from Classical Antiquity, in the form of a chronology of portraits appearing on coins. The study determines which represented coins correspond to genuine, ancient coins, and the degree of their accuracy in reproducing the legends, and the iconography and style of the originals. The study then addresses the methodology by which Fulvio attempted to exploit coins as historical documents, intersecting with humanist literary and historical studies of ancient Rome, the reception of ancient artifacts, and the response of visual artists to ancient portrait renderings.
Author: Petr Balcárek
This book offers the first comprehensive study of Byzantine influence on the art and iconography of East Central Europe. Petr Balcárek focuses on the Byzantine cultural and religious legacy in the Czech lands, thereby bringing to light rarely seen images and presenting fresh hypotheses based on newly-explored theological interpretations and historical evidence.

Including a discussion of the Czech and Slovak historiography on Byzantine studies, the work analyses significant artistic and iconographical artefacts in light of the intricate historical and political relationships that shaped Byzantine presence in these territories, comparing them with similar objects from other areas of Byzantine influence in order to draw wide-reaching conclusions.
Author: Joshua Frydman
The introduction of writing enables new forms of literature, but these can be invisible in works that survive as manuscripts. Through looking at inscriptions of poetry on garbage and as graffiti, we can glimpse how literature spread along with writing.
This study uses these lesser-studied sources, including inscriptions on pottery, architecture, and especially wooden tablets known as mokkan, to uncover how poetry, and literature more broadly, was used, shared and thrown away in early Japan. Through looking at these disposable and informal sources, we explore the development of early Japanese literature, and even propose parallels to similar developments in other societies across space and time.
This book solves the long-standing mystery of a Christian monastery near Samarkand, seen and described by two Arab travellers in the tenth century. Despite several attempts made since the 1890s, its precise location had never been established. The first part covers the quest, the find, and the archaeological excavations’ results. Then the author proceeds to search for a mediaeval Christian enclave near modern Tashkent, which appears to have been washed away by a river that changed its course over centuries.
Apart from the Christians, the book also touches upon the Manichaeans, Buddhists, Zoroastrians and other Sogdians, their languages, faiths, and material remnants.
Burial Assemblages at the National Museum of Denmark Gate of the Priests Series Volume 2
Previously unpublished, the Danish Lot of antiquities from the Tomb of the Priests of Amun (Bab el-Gasus) is thoroughly examined in this book. The in-depth analysis of the objects is followed by an assessment of how these objects were crafted, designed, used and recycled in the Theban necropolis, a procedure that not only reveals to be instrumental in the dating of the objects, as it sheds light into the extraordinary dynamics of funerary workshops during the 21st Dynasty.
The volume also examines the arrival of the Lot and its reception in Denmark.
[Ancient Architecture in Syria: Djebel Simʿân]
Editor / Translator: Aisha Muhammed Ali Moussa
يستعرض كتاب العمارة القديمة في سوريا (جبل سمعان)، من تأليف هوارد كروسبي باتلر وترجمة عائشة موسى، 24 موقعًا أثريًا في شمال سوريا. ويُسلِّط كل موقعٍ منها الضوء على اكتشافات جديدة تقف شاهدةً على عظمة الحضارات التي امتزجت بين جنباتها، مخلفةً وراءها إرثًا سرمديًا لا ينسى.
وتأتي قلعة القديس سمعان العمودي في طليعة هذه المواقع وتعد أكثرها شهرة، وبقيت في صدارة العمارة الكاتدرائية حتى بناء آيا صوفيا، كما بشَّرت بالتطور العمراني الديني اللاحق في كل من القسطنطينية وأوروبا.
وثمة مخططات ومقاطع عرضية وصور توضح جميع هذه المعالم، وتعمل على توثيق أبنيتها وتفاصيلها وتخليد هذا الكنز الذي لا يقدَّر بثمن للأجيال القادمة.
The Ancient Architecture in Syria (Djebel Simʿân), written by Howard C. Butler and translated by Aisha Moussa, covers 24 ancient sites in Northern Syria. Each site sparks new revelations about the great civilizations mingled there, leaving behind an unforgettable, everlasting legacy.
The first and most notable site is the citadel of St Simeon Stylets, which was not surpassed by any cathedral till Hagia Sophia and heralded the subsequent religious architectural development in Constantinople and Europe.
Each monument is illustrated by plans, cross-sections and photographs documenting its structure and details and preserving this invaluable treasure for endless generations to come.
Public Porticoes, Small Baths, Shops/Workshops, and ‘Middle Class’ Houses in the East Mediterranean
Author: Solinda Kamani
This book examines neglected architectural decoration from the late antique city of the East Mediterranean. It addresses the omission in scholarship of discussion about the embellishment of non-monumental secular buildings (public porticoes, small public baths, shops/workshops, and non-elite houses). The finishing of these structures has been overlooked at the expense of more lofty buildings and remains one of the least known aspects of the late antique city.
The book surveys the archaeological evidence for decoration in the region, with the maritime sites of Ostia and Ephesus selected as case studies. Drawing upon archaeological, written, and visual sources, it attempts to reconstruct how such buildings appeared to late antique viewers and investigates why they were decorated as they were.
Transylvania has some of the most valuable monuments of medieval architecture in Europe. The oldest church was built in the 10th century, but most others came into being only after 1200. Later changes have considerably modified the appearance of still-standing buildings. Written sources are lacking for answers to questions about the identity of the builders and patrons. Countering the idea that only standing structures can reflect the history of medieval churches in Transylvania, this book uses archaeological sources in order to answer some of those questions and to bring to light the hidden past of many monuments.
Construction Processes and Transmission of Knowledge from Late Antiquity to Early Islam
Volume Editor: Piero Gilento
This edited volume examines the construction processes and the mechanisms of transmission of knowledge between the eastern and western Mediterranean lands from the late Roman period to the early centuries of Islam. The essays explore issues of material culture, craft techniques, technological and typological changes and cultural contacts in Syria, Jordan, North Africa and Spain. The volume includes case studies on prestigious architectural complexes, defensive systems and other structures located in major urban centres (Cyrrhus, Bosra, Jerash, Sousse, Kairouan and Cordoba), as well as minor sites and rural buildings. It offers a fresh contribution to the long-lasting historiographic debate on the transition from antiquity to the Middle Ages and how Early Islamic architecture fostered the structural assumptions for new building experiences in many Mediterranean regions.

Contributors: Antonio Almagro, Shaker Al Shbib, Stefano Anastasio, Ignacio Arce, Jean-Claude Bessac, Pascale Clauss-Balty, Piero Gilento, Mattia Guidetti, Pedro Gurriarán Daza, Roberto Parenti, Pauline Piraud-Fournet, María de los Ángeles Utrero Agudo, Jean-Pierre van Staëvel, Apolline Vernet, François Villeneuve.