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What does 'performance' mean in Christian culture? How is it connected to rituals, dramatic and visual arts, and the written word? Performing the Sacred: Christian Representation and the Arts explores both the meaning of re-presentation and the role of performance within the Christian tradition between arts and drama. The essays in this book demonstrate that the idea of performance was central to Christian theology and that—from the Middle Ages to the Early Modern era—it became a device through which people saw, prayed, preached, wrote, imagined, officiated rites, celebrated cults, and practiced devotions. Seen that performance is a habitus within Christianity, performing the sacred does not just mean representing it, but rather enacting it in a tangible, visible and involved way.
Ein Grundlagentext zur Praxis und Ästhetik des japanischen Nō-Theaters. Zweisprachige Ausgabe. Übersetzt, philosophisch erläutert und herausgegeben von Ryōsuke Ōhashi, Rolf Elberfeld und Leon Krings
Das Buch bietet eine philosophisch kommentierte Übersetzung des altjapanischen Textes von Zeami zur Praxis und Ästhetik des Nō-Theaters.
Zeami beschreibt nicht nur die Praxis des Schauspielers in verschiedenen Aspekten, sondern entwickelt auch zentrale ästhetische Kategorien für die Rezeption des Nō-Theaters. Die Übersetzung wird ergänzt durch interpretierende Aufsätze zu Themen wie der Maske im Nō-Theater, dem Gebrauch des Körpers und einer Ästhetik des Atmens. Der Band liefert somit eine solide Grundlage für eine philosophisch-ästhetische Auseinandersetzung mit einer alten japanischen Schauspieltradition.

Abstract

This essay provides an analysis of the impact of Netflix on the African screen media sector, by focusing on the Nigerian film industry (Nollywood). It follows the invitation to study Netflix in specific socio-historical and national contexts that several scholars have formulated over the past few years as a way to respond to the complexity of the emerging landscape of internet-distributed television. In order to achieve this objective, the essay focuses on the impact of Netflix’s involvement on the production and distribution of Nigerian content, offering also a few insights on the equally important topic of Netflix’s impact on African audiences. The overall aim is to historicize Netflix’s intervention, detailing the phases of its involvement in Nigeria, its specificities in relation to the intervention of previous local and international actors in the field of content production and distribution (on both streaming and digital television networks), and the controversies its arrival triggers among film professionals in the largest African screen media industry.

In: Studies in World Cinema
In: Studies in World Cinema
Author: Matthew Marcus

Abstract

The mini-series Ethos (Bir Başkadır), produced by Netflix Turkey, was a critical and social media sensation, distinguished by its narrative and visual sophistication and its explicit engagement with contemporary social, cultural and political tensions. However, considered in light of larger questions about Netflix and streaming television in general, Ethos also provides a meta-commentary on contradictory aspects of streaming television, particularly those discussed by Ramon Lobato in his book Netflix Nations. In particular, Ethos self-consciously calls attention to ways in which it is simultaneously a local and transnational product. It also invites consideration of the divergent expectations and responses of its varied audiences, both in Turkey and abroad.

In: Studies in World Cinema
Through an innovative interdisciplinary reading and field research, Igor Chabrowski analyses the history of the development of opera in Sichuan, arguing that opera serves as a microcosm of the profound transformation of modern Chinese culture between the 18th century and 1950s. He investigates the complex path of opera over this course of history: exiting the temple festivals, becoming a public obsession on commercial stages, and finally being harnessed to partisan propaganda work. The book analyzes the process of cross-regional integration of Chinese culture and the emergence of the national opera genre. Moreover, opera is shown as an example of the culture wars that raged inside China’s popular culture.
Author: Miya Treadwell

Abstract

In this article, I argue that recent Black American narratives on Netflix intersect with and can be understood through principles of world cinema. Black American narratives have long existed outside of the Hollywood conventions that often serve as a line of demarcation in world cinema scholarship. Building on Lúcia Nagib’s definition of world cinema () and her concept of realistic modes of production (2020a/2020b), I show how contemporary Black American narratives on Netflix are sustaining a diasporic perspective. Although originating in the US, its marginalized production and preoccupations with colonial dynamics or racial and geographical inequality help to regard this content as a mode of world cinema. Moreover, as In Our Mothers’ Gardens () and High on the Hog () demonstrate, these connections with world cinema have been intensified by Netflix’s production model.

Open Access
In: Studies in World Cinema

Abstract

The article analyzes the catalog, acts of curation, and promotional materials of the Romanian-based vod platform Cinepub (www.cinepub.ro). It also draws evidence from an interview conducted with the founder and manager of the platform, Lucian Georgescu. The analysis reveals the embedding of the service in the Romanian cinema culture, as well as in a global digital periphery. Some of the aspects that make Cinepub’s service stand out, the article argues, can be interpreted as responses to and reflections of its embedding. The broader question raised by my case study is to what extent and under what conditions vod s from the European periphery can become viable actors on present-day markets.

In: Studies in World Cinema

Abstract

This essay investigates the worldly parameters of the Netflix documentary genre. While Netflix on the surface communicates a rhetoric of a truly global vision for media production and circulation, data analysis shows that the documentary genre is still predominantly U.S. American. I use Raymond Williams’ 1975 caution that “genuinely open skies” would be almost impossible to materialize to interpret the implications of this in today’s global landscape. A close analysis of the 2019 Academy Award-winning documentary American Factory, a text that takes the cultural clash between the U.S. and China in the wake of globalization as its subject, reveals the geopolitical stakes of such documentary mediation and imbalance. Combining quantitative and qualitative readings ultimately offers a window onto the tensions between cultural imperialism and globalization in both form and content within the Netflix documentary genre.

In: Studies in World Cinema