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Sources, Iconography and Science
In Leonardo’s Fables: Sources, Iconography and Science, Giuditta Cirnigliaro explores the compositional methods and sources of Leonardo’s fables to investigate their relationship with illustrations and scientific studies. Often considered secondary works with respect to his public masterpieces, in this study Leonardo’s fables are revealed to be part of an aesthetic, scientific, and philosophical project intended for the acquisition of world knowledge.
By concentrating on the chaotic character of Leonardo’s manuscripts, the book gradually discloses the artist’s creative thinking that uses the page as a space for experimentation. Ultimately, Leonardo’s employment of fables allows him to tie together his technical and artistic skills, empirical observation, and experience, to show the mechanical interaction of forces at the basis of every physical phenomenon.
Burial Assemblages at the National Museum of Denmark Gate of the Priests Series Volume 2
Previously unpublished, the Danish Lot of antiquities from the Tomb of the Priests of Amun (Bab el-Gasus) is thoroughly examined in this book. The in-depth analysis of the objects is followed by an assessment of how these objects were crafted, designed, used and recycled in the Theban necropolis, a procedure that not only reveals to be instrumental in the dating of the objects, as it sheds light into the extraordinary dynamics of funerary workshops during the 21st Dynasty.
The volume also examines the arrival of the Lot and its reception in Denmark.
Judging Old Masters at Agnew’s and the National Gallery, c.1874-1916
Author: Alison Clarke
In Spaces of Connoisseurship, Alison Clarke explores the ‘who’, ‘where’ and ‘how’ of judging Old Master paintings in the nineteenth-century British art trade. She describes how the staff at family art dealers Thomas Agnew & Sons (“Agnew’s”) and London’s National Gallery took advantage of emerging technologies such as the railways and photography. Through encounters with pictures in a range of locations, both private and public, these art market actors could build up the visual memory and necessary expertise to compare artworks and judge them in terms of attribution, condition and beauty. Also explored are the display tactics adopted by both commercial outfit and art museum to showcase pictures once acquired. In a time of ever-spiralling art prices, this book tackles the question of why some paintings are preferred over others, and exactly how art experts reach their judgements.
The Laboratories of Antoine Laurent Lavoisier (1743-1794)
The substantial collection of Antoine Laurent Lavoisier’s apparatus is not the only surviving collection of eighteenth-century chemical apparatus and instrumentation, but it is without question the most important. The present study provides the first scientific catalogue of Lavoisier’s surviving apparatus. This collection of instruments is remarkable not only for the quality of many of them but, above all, for the number of items that have survived (ca. 600 items). Given such a wealth and variety of instruments, this study also offers the first comprehensive attempt to reconstruct the cultural and social context of Lavoisier’s experimental activities.
In: The Arsenal of Eighteenth-Century Chemistry
In: The Arsenal of Eighteenth-Century Chemistry
In: The Arsenal of Eighteenth-Century Chemistry
In: The Arsenal of Eighteenth-Century Chemistry
In: The Arsenal of Eighteenth-Century Chemistry
In: The Arsenal of Eighteenth-Century Chemistry