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During the colonial and early independence periods, the Chinese community in Batavia/Jakarta was governed by the semi-autonomous Kong Koan (Chinese Council). Its members, known as Chinese officers, regularly convened to discuss civil registration, taxation, religion, finances, health, education, safety, legal matters, and other community concerns.

This volume presents the Council's annotated Malay minutes: unique archival material that provides insights into the daily life of Indonesia’s vibrant Chinese-descended community. While much existing scholarship relies on Dutch sources, this volume offers a perspective from within.
Volume Editors: and
During the colonial and early independence periods, the Chinese community in Batavia/Jakarta was governed by the semi-autonomous Kong Koan (Chinese Council). Its members, known as Chinese officers, regularly convened to discuss civil registration, taxation, religion, finances, health, education, safety, legal matters, and other community concerns.

This volume presents the Council's annotated Malay minutes: unique archival material that provides insights into the daily life of Indonesia’s vibrant Chinese-descended community. While much existing scholarship relies on Dutch sources, this volume offers a perspective from within.
Indo-Muslim and Portuguese History, Urban Fabric and Architecture
The ex-Portuguese Island of Diu – a once strategic maritime gateway to the bay of Cambay, Gujarat, India – features in the corpus of Portuguese history and literature, but a comprehensive study of the island was lacking. Mehrdad and Natalie Shokoohy, known for surveying little-known historic sites in India, present the study of the built environment of Diu in conjunction with the contemporaneous Indian histories in Arabic and Persian, resulting in a fresh view of Indian Ocean commerce and conquest. Extensive surveys of the Fort, the Town and the Island, include the epigraphy, fortifications, urban fabric, mosques, shrines, churches, monasteries, water infrastructure and the Zoroastrian Fire Temple and Towers of Silence. Fragmentary Hindu and Jain archaeological remains are also noted.
Literary, Historical, Sociolinguistic and Anthropological Approaches
Global Portuguese results from conferences convened at the University of London School of Advanced Study to highlight legacies of Portuguese empire in postcolonial societies. Its chapters trace Portuguese legacies from the early modern to contemporary period through language, literature, linguistics, and cuisine. There are sections devoted to sociolinguistic and anthropological method, and studies on Thailand, Sri Lanka, Goa, Macau, Brazil, and Angola.

Contributors are: Matthias Rõhrig Assunção, Dorothée Boulanger, Silvia Figueiredo Brandão, David Brookshaw, Paul Melo e Castro, Augusto Soares da Silva, Shihan de Silva Jayasuriya, Stefan Halikowski Smith, Annabel Jackson, Ivana Stolze Lima, Selina Patel Nascimento, Malyn Newitt, Gerhard Seibert, Andrzej Stuart-Thompson, Raan-Hann Tan, and Silvia Rodrigues Vieira.
To think of colonialism as a thing of the past entails conceiving history in episodic terms, as if the era of Empire was somehow distinct and distant from our present-day realities. Yet the legacy of colonialism is still very much with us in myriad of forms: from the postcolonial geography of Asia, which was largely fixed during the colonial era, through to the economic, technological, and political inequalities. These inequalities remain obvious in the present international order with a new Cold War developing between the US and China over global supremacy.

For many postcolonial societies, there has never been a clean break from the era of Empire. Much of what has been happening in postcolonial societies in Asia is the result of a long process of social engineering, economic control, and cultural imposition, initially introduced by colonial regimes, and subsequently replicated and perpetuated by postcolonial states in the interests of internal security. Understanding our present requires an understanding of the past.

This series aims to cover the various aspects of colonialism as it (re)shaped Asia in its own image, by focusing on the modalities and impact of colonialism in Asia from the mid-18th to the early 20th century. Contributions to the series include works from a wide range of disciplines – from history to literature, political history to economics, from Southeast Asia through South Asia to East Asia and the respective studies thereof. Our goal is to provide works of reference for scholars interested in colonialism, the history of empires, Asian history, local cultures, and Asian Studies in general. 
The Art of Statecraft in Early China
This annotated translation of Han Feizi introduces one of China’s most controversial political texts. Generations of Chinese literati have deplored Han Feizi’s cynical assault on moralizing discourse, blatant authoritarianism, and gleeful derision of fellow intellectuals. Yet many were attracted to the text’s practical advice, especially its advocacy of reliance on impartial standards rather than on the personal qualities of the leaders (who may be dupes, selfish, or both). And many more admired the text’s incisiveness, wit, humour, and realistic approach to politics.
The new translation makes the text’s political philosophy and its literary gems accessible to the readers.