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Volume Editors: and
The Prologue to John's Gospel has been an enigmatic object of inquiry in the history of biblical scholarship. This volume reengages readers with thirteen essays from various perspectives on the Prologue. These perspectives include source oriented approaches, form oriented approaches, functional approaches, and alternative non-traditional approaches. This book attempts to pave new paths to understanding the Prologue and cause readers to think more deeply about the beginning of John's Gospel.
Understanding Biblical Engagement for Transformation
Your word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path (Ps 119:105).” An avid Bible-reader reflects, 'As the Lord leads, the lamp illuminates my path, step by step.” Such small step makes sense when connected to another inspirational moment, marked by her deeply moved heart. 'The movement of the heart' emerges as a recurring phenomenon in the in-depth interviews with dedicated Bible readers who share powerful narratives of their Bible-reading journey's ups and downs. By unraveling the psychological, spiritual, and cultural dimensions of this heart-moving experience, this book forges a fresh practical theology of Bible reading.
Volume Editors: and
This volume explores the ways in which representatives of different monotheistic traditions experienced themselves as “the other” or were perceived and described as such by their contemporaries. This central category – which includes not only those of different religions, but also converts, foreigners, sectarians, and women – is studied from various perspectives in a range of texts composed by Jewish, Christian, and Muslim authors during late antique and mediaeval times. Conceptualizations of such “others” are often intrinsically related to the idea of exile, another important category that is analysed in this work.
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This study reframes and reorients the study of 2 Enoch, moving beyond debates about Christian or Jewish authorship and considering the work in the context of eclectic and erudite cultures in late antiquity, particularly Syria. The study compares the work with the Parables of Enoch and then with a variety of writings associated with late antique Syrian theology, demonstrating the distinctively eclectic character of 2 Enoch. It offers new paradigms for research into the pseudepigrapha.
An Intertextual Reading of the Gospel of Matthew
Although the Gospel of Matthew emphasizes Jesus as the son of David, no one has systematically investigated how 1-2 Samuel influence Matthew's portrayal of Jesus as the son of David. This work addresses that lacuna and shows how the sustained use of 1-2 Samuel in Matthew evokes the themes of mercy and righteousness as the hallmarks of a proper Davidic shepherd. The book's systematic intertextual and narrative approach offers another way to understand Matthew’s Christology and portrayal of the kingdom of heaven. It helps the reader appreciate the justice-focused nature of Jesus’ rule and its religious and political implications.
Thomistic Concepts in the Moral Thought of Franciscus Junius (1545–1602)
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This extended study of Thomistic concepts in the work of Franciscus Junius (1545–1602) is the first English monograph on Junius’s theology in more than 40 years, and the first analysis of his use of Thomistic moral concepts. On a broad level, this project investigates the reception of Thomistic ideas in the early modern Reformed tradition. On a narrow level, this study contributes to an examination of Junius’s moral theology itself.