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In the first book-length study of Takkanot Kandiyah, Martin Borýsek analyses this fascinating corpus of Hebrew texts written between 1228 –1583 by the leaders of the Jewish community in Candia, the capital of Venetian Crete. Collected in the 16th century by the Cretan Jewish historian Elijah Capsali, the communal byelaws offer a unique perspective on the history of a vibrant, culturally diverse Jewish community during three centuries of Venetian rule. As well as confronting practical problems such as deciding whether Christian wine can be made kosher by adding honey, or stopping irresponsible Jewish youths disturbing religious services by setting off fireworks in the synagogue, Takkanot Kandiyah presents valuable material for the study of communal autonomy and institutional memory in pre-modern Jewish society.
In: Jewish Communal Autonomy and Institutional Memory in Venetian Crete
In: Jewish Communal Autonomy and Institutional Memory in Venetian Crete
In: Jewish Communal Autonomy and Institutional Memory in Venetian Crete
In: Jewish Communal Autonomy and Institutional Memory in Venetian Crete
In: Jewish Communal Autonomy and Institutional Memory in Venetian Crete
In: Jewish Communal Autonomy and Institutional Memory in Venetian Crete
In: Jewish Communal Autonomy and Institutional Memory in Venetian Crete