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A Dialectical Inquiry into the Rationality of Religion
The Devil’s Advocate versus God’s Honest Truth is a scholarly monograph exploring the rationality of religion, particularly the tenability of theism, through a dialectical analysis of plausible arguments for the existence of God versus reasonable grounds for suspicion. It offers a comprehensive and balanced coverage of the issues, inviting readers to reflect and ponder the subject in its full scope. The book does not, however, compromise on delivering the objectivity required in an area so dominated by sectarian scholarship and polarized beyond reconciliation.
Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion, Volume 34 takes an intersectional approach to the study of religious and non-religious belief, in different geographical contexts, using a variety of methods and always privileging the layered identities of those who 'live' religion and non-religion in their daily lives. The Open Section includes articles on topics of everyday significance such as experiences of Zakat in Qatar, Muslim marriages in Britain and Indian migrants living in Indonesia. The Special Section (A Sociology of Religion or Belief in South Asia) includes articles that interrogate the politics of religious identity in India, Pakistan and Bangladesh.
Throughout, this volume demonstrates how experiences of belief are shaped by local and historical contexts, in addition to theology.
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Using an interdisciplinary approach to the problem of the self, this study focuses on a gap left by previous philosophers. This shortcoming is related to the nature of the self to commit errors that become part of the identity of the self. These errors stain the self and make "I" what it is. This study shines light on the self that will give the reader a more balanced understanding of it. Fictional literature will be invoked to illustrate features of the self associated with errors. The book is divided into two parts: a review of selected theories of the self and a reconsideration of the self and errors producing being.  
Understanding Biblical Engagement for Transformation
Your word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path (Ps 119:105).” An avid Bible-reader reflects, 'As the Lord leads, the lamp illuminates my path, step by step.” Such small step makes sense when connected to another inspirational moment, marked by her deeply moved heart. 'The movement of the heart' emerges as a recurring phenomenon in the in-depth interviews with dedicated Bible readers who share powerful narratives of their Bible-reading journey's ups and downs. By unraveling the psychological, spiritual, and cultural dimensions of this heart-moving experience, this book forges a fresh practical theology of Bible reading.
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Abstract

For four decades John Boorman’s “Excalibur” has been either partially analyzed by scholars in Jungian categories or just described as a Jungian-inspired film in more general terms by film critics. The six-stage model of King Arthur’s personal and archetypal development in “Excalibur” was first published by Jungian analyst Al Collins in 1981, but remained unknown in mainstream scholarship. This article describes this significant absence and argues for a shift to significant presence, merging many Jungian approaches to “Excalibur” with Piotr Toczyski’s own depth-psychological vision of Boormanian quasi-Jungian Arthurianism. The scholars globally may get further inspiration to relaunch new interpretations of this classic Arthurian retelling in terms of dynamics of conscious and unconscious, meeting the shadow, coping with anger, underlying projections, withdrawal of projections as the moment of lysis similar to psychotherapy, and the self-awareness of archetypes. The process of projection withdrawal is the hero’s journey on its own, bringing some similarities with well-known Joseph Campbell’s post-Jungian model.

In: International Journal of Jungian Studies
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Jung’s conceptualization of synchronicity has a relation to his engagement in astrology began in roughly 1906. Jung’s conceptualization of varieties of synchronistic experiences can be divided into non-divinatory and divinatory experiences. Among the divinatory sources, he overlooked the differences between I-Ching divination and astrology. His neglect caused a logical discrepancy in his early synchronicity theory. Forty-six years after his first engagement in astrology, his essay on synchronicity (1952) possesses a long section for his astrological experiment. In his astrological experiment, his problematic understanding of metaphysical and methodological issues behind the experiment led to the failure of his statistical part of the experiment. The case study part of it turns to support his meaningful chance version of synchronicity theory and leads to the acknowledgement of the standard version of synchronicity theory: meaningful chances.

Open Access
In: International Journal of Jungian Studies

Abstract

This paper looks at the 2015 use of the Australian rock song Khe Sanh by far-right nationalist group Reclaim Australia and how it points to deeper archetypal dynamics at play, which are driving the appearance and behaviour of groups like this. Drawing from the work of Swiss psychoanalyst Carl Jung, I treat the song as an expression of the archetype of the fallen hero, who confronts darkness but cannot reintegrate back into the social world and, instead, remains fallen. As I discuss, this song resonates deeply with Reclaim Australia members because it reflects their own ideological conceptions of their place in the changing Australian nation. I use a Jungian archetypal approach because it allows us to explore the underlying psychic structure and instinctive patterns that drive the behaviour of groups like this. Where other approaches may simply focus on the behaviour, an archetypal approach goes much deeper, addressing the root of the behaviour.

In: International Journal of Jungian Studies
Light of a divine or transcendent nature is widely revered in various religious and mystical traditions around the world, and luminosity with mystical qualities such as love, bliss, peace, and noetic realization is also frequently reported by contemporary experiencers. Despite being described as a profoundly significant, sacred, and transformative experience, mystical luminosity has received relatively little attention in modern scholarship and scientific study, and has only been examined empirically within isolated contexts, such as NDEs or contemplative practices. This study examines the phenomenology which binds mystical luminosity across various experiential contexts to construct a phenomenologically grounded theoretical model. A three-part mixed methods investigation using a new mystical luminosity experience scale based on this model is then summarized, with findings generally supporting and further clarifying the model.

Abstract

Light of a divine or transcendent nature is widely revered in various religious and mystical traditions around the world, and luminosity with mystical qualities such as love, bliss, peace, and noetic realization is also frequently reported by contemporary experiencers. Despite being described as a profoundly significant, sacred, and transformative experience, mystical luminosity has received relatively little attention in modern scholarship and scientific study, and has only been examined empirically within isolated contexts, such as NDE s or contemplative practices. This study examines the phenomenology which binds mystical luminosity across various experiential contexts to construct a phenomenologically grounded theoretical model. A three-part mixed methods investigation using a new mystical luminosity experience scale based on this model is then summarized, with findings generally supporting and further clarifying the model.

In: Mystical Luminosity Experience
Edited by J.A. Belzen

The series published one volume over the last 5 years.