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25 Books from Leiden That Changed the World
Books That Made History highlights twenty-five books published in Leiden or written by a Leiden scholar or alumnus, that have a strong connection to Leiden’s academic history, from the founding of Leiden University in 1575 to the present day. These books have a lasting, global impact on our way of thinking, and are relevant up to this day. The books are described from a contemporary perspective in order to elicit the reader's sense of wonder that the contemporary ideas and insights anchored in the books, are inextricably linked to the publication in which this idea was first made public to the world.
A Festschrift on the Occasion of the 50th Anniversary of BETH
During the past 50 years, theological libraries have confronted secularisation and religious pluralism, along with revolutionary technological developments that brought not only significant challenges but also unexpected opportunities to adopt new instruments for the transfer of knowledge through the automation and computerisation of libraries. This book shows how European theological libraries tackled these challenges; how they survived by redefining their task, by participating in the renewal of scholarly librarianship, and by networking internationally. Since 1972, BETH, the Association of European Theological Libraries, has stimulated this process by enabling contacts among a growing number of national library associations all over Europe.
Editor: Jorge Ledo
Editorial Board / Council Member: Harm den Boer
This new series publishes high quality philological editions of a selected number of influential works or authors forbidden by the Iberian Inquisition, or challenging the idea of an Imperial Spain/Portugal. The volumes are all accompanied by studies by leading scholars in the field. An important criterion for inclusion in the series is that the chosen text is either unpublished or does not have a modern, scholarly edition. As such, the series presents a highly innovative content. The series will reflect the cultural and intellectual production of all Iberian authors, Jewish and Morisco authors, but also of reformers and/or Catholic authors who challenged prevalent religious, political, or literary discourse.

The series has published one volume since 2014.
In: Quaerendo
Combining theoretical and empirical approaches, this volume offers a wide-ranging survey of periodical research today. It illustrates the shift from content-related investigations and archival recovery to multidisciplinary analyses which consider, for instance, how magazines, newspapers, and other serial print products shape our opinions and help us to form like-minded communities. International specialists explore periodicals as relational artefacts, highlighting editorial constellations, material conditions, translation, design, marketing, and the consumption of newspapers and magazines from the late seventeenth to the twenty-first century. A must-read for academic and interested readers who wish to explore new and relevant ways to analyze periodicals.

Abstract

The Spiegel Historiael (1284–1317) is a Middle Dutch translation of Vincent de Beauvais’ Speculum Historiale which was initiated by Jacob van Maerlant and completed by Philip Utenbroeke and Lodewijk van Velthem. The text survives in various manuscripts and fragments, except the Fourth part, started by Maerlant and finished by Velthem, which has only been fragmentarily preserved. Two newly discovered pieces of parchment (Tilburg A and B) at the Regionaal Archief Tilburg were part of an unknown, early fourteenth-century Spiegel Historiael manuscript. Only Tilburg A contains text, i.e. part of the table of rubrics for three books, including the transition between Maerlant’s and Velthem’s work. Its use as binding material has rendered the recto of Tilburg A largely illegible. At the Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures in Hamburg, Multispectral Imaging and X-Ray fluorescence spectroscopy were applied to Tilburg A, greatly increasing our understanding of the fragment. Palaeographical and codicological analyses showed that the original codex to which the fragments belonged was made between 1315–c.1330. The text is written in a Brabantine dialect. These properties situate the fragments in temporal and geographical proximity to Lodewijk van Velthem. Furthermore, we claim the same decorator was responsible for the penwork in both Tilburg A and the Velthem-owned Lancelot Compilation. This could place the fragments in a wider network of scribes and decorators around Velthem. This article provides the first study of the fragments and an edition of Tilburg A.

Comparisons with both the Spiegel Historiael manuscript at the Koninklijke Bibliotheek in The Hague as well as a fifteenth-century German prose translation reveal distinctive variants between the latter two texts and Tilburg A.

In: Quaerendo
In: Quaerendo

Abstract

In this article, we analyse a sammelband of incunabula held at the Diocesan Library of Córdoba, which we believe belonged to William Hewster († 1492), a clergyman and professor at Oxford. It contains six incunabula from Antwerp, Leuven, Paris and Oxford, printed in the workshops of Gerard Leeu (3), John of Westphalia, Antoine Caillaut, and Theodoric Rood & Thomas Hunte. Among the works is the only known copy of Elegantiae terminorum ex Laurentio Valla et aliis collectae, Antwerp: Gerard Leeu, 7.XI.1487 (GW M35200) and the only complete copy of Ars memorativa by Jacobus Publicius [Paris: Antoine Caillaut, 1483–90] (GW M36439).

In: Quaerendo
In: Periodical Studies Today
Author: Andreas Beck

Abstract

As this essay aims to show, explicit self-reflection in early illustrated journals cannot be trusted: They underlie discursive constraints and may therefore (also) obscure the aims of such periodicals instead of exposing them. The illustration practice of texts (in which these statements are included), however, frequently offers, such is the working hypothesis, an implicit self-reflection which moves in a different direction: in the example presented in this article, one that refutes an explicit self-description by employing paratextual aspects such as the use of a layout plan (or lack thereof), paper quality, page numbering, placement of illustrations, and intertextual references. With the reconstruction of this implicit self-disclosure, the close reading of Magasin Pittoresque and Penny Magazine in the following case study intends to blaze a trail for an adequate analysis of illustrated journals of the 1830s – a trail that sheds particular light on the surprising complexity of verbal-visual forms of communication.

In: Periodical Studies Today