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Author: Brian Madigan
Andrea Fulvio’s Illustrium imagines and the Beginnings of Classical Archaeology is a study of the book acknowledged by contemporaries to be the first attempt (1517) to publish artifacts from Classical Antiquity, in the form of a chronology of portraits appearing on coins. The study determines which represented coins correspond to genuine, ancient coins, and the degree of their accuracy in reproducing the legends, and the iconography and style of the originals. The study then addresses the methodology by which Fulvio attempted to exploit coins as historical documents, intersecting with humanist literary and historical studies of ancient Rome, the reception of ancient artifacts, and the response of visual artists to ancient portrait renderings.
The queenship of the first European Renaissance queen regnant never ceases to fascinate. Was she a saint or a bigoted zealot? A pious wife or the one wearing the pants? Was she ultimately responsible for genocide? A case has been made to canonize her. Does she deserve to be called Saint Isabel? As different groups from Fascists to feminists continue to fight over Isabel as cultural capital, we ask which (if any) of these recyclings are legitimate or appropriate. Or has this figure taken on a life of her own?

Contributors include: Roger Boase, David A. Boruchoff, John Edwards, Emily Francomano, Edward Friedman, Cristina Guardiola-Griffiths, Michelle Hamilton, Elizabeth Teresa Howe, Hilaire Kallendorf, William D. Phillips, Jr., Nuria Silleras-Fernandez, Caroline Travalia, and Jessica Weiss.
Teaching Cartesian Philosophy in the Early Modern Age
The volume offers the first large-scale study of the teaching of Descartes’ philosophy in the early modern age. Its twenty chapters explore the clash between Descartes’ “new” philosophy and the established pedagogical practices and institutional concerns, as well as the various strategies employed by Descartes’ supporters in order to communicate his ideas to their students. The volume considers a vast array of topics, sources, and institutions, across the borders of countries and confessions, both within and without the university setting (public conferences, private tutorials, distance learning by letter) and enables us thereby to reconsider from a fresh perspective the history of early modern philosophy and education.
Author: Adam Marks
The Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648) was a significant and traumatic event in the history of Europe. Based upon original archival research conducted across European archives, this book discusses both the successes and failures of the early Stuarts’ foreign policy.
It sheds new light on the Spanish match, reassesses the military capacity of the Stuart state in the run up to the Civil War and fundamentally challenges the idea that there was little or no engagement by England with the Thirty Years’ War.