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Volume Two: Uses of History in Constitutional Adjudication
Constitutions are a product of history, but what is the role of history in interpreting and applying constitutional provisions? This volume addresses that question from a comparative perspective, examining different uses of history by courts in determining constitutional meaning. The book shows that there is considerable debate around the role of history in constitutional adjudication. Are, for example, historical public debates over the adoption of a constitution relevant to reading its provisions today? If a constitution represents a break from a prior repressive regime, should courts construe the constitution’s provisions in light of that background? Are former constitutions relevant to interpreting a new constitution? Through an assessment of current practices the volume offers some lessons for the future practices of courts as they adjudicate constitutional cases.

Contributors are: Mark D. Rosen, Jorge M. Farinacci-Fernós, Justin Collings, Jean-Christophe Bédard-Rubin, Cem Tecimer, Ángel Aday Jiménez Alemán, Ana Beatriz Robalinho, Keigo Obayashi, Zoltán Szente, Shih-An Wang, and Diego Werneck Arguelhes.
Globalisation, migration, and (de-)secularisation have fundamentally transformed the concepts of religion, state, and law during the last decades. The main goal of this interdisciplinary approach is to clarify the multifaceted theoretical and practical challenges of religious diversity and socio-political pluralism in Europe.

In twenty-two chapters, the contributions to this volume revisit basic concepts, structures and institutional settings such as sovereignty, the dogma of the separation of state, church and/or religion; human and minority rights; gender and religion; varieties of fundamentalisms, interreligious dialogue and peacebuilding and, not least, religious education.
This book explores how the fathers of humanist jurisprudence contributed to the emergence of ius gentium as the common law not simply of Europe, but of all mankind, in the early sixteenth century. They did so by so thoroughly reinterpreting terms, idioms, and categories preserved within Justinian’s Digest that they fundamentally transformed them to address sources and limits of political and legal authority in the broader context of early-modern state formation.

In the process, they offered theories of universal jurisprudence grounded in the attributes and actions of man and states that anticipated some of the most salient features of modern sovereignty and rights. Theories that we tend to identify with post-Reformation political and legal thought, rather than the early Renaissance.
Illustrating Byzantine Law through the Sources
This is the first book in English providing a wide range of Byzantine legal sources. In six chapters, this book explains and illustrates Byzantine law through a selection of fundamental Byzantine legal sources, beginning with the sources before the time of Justinian, and extending up to AD 1453.
For all sources English translations are provided next to the original Greek (and Latin) text. In some cases, tables or other features are included that help further elucidate the source and illustrate its nature. The volume offers a clear yet detailed primer to Byzantine law, its sources, and its significance.
Stefan Thönissen geht den philosophisch-theologischen Wurzeln der westlichen Rechtstradition nach und legt dar, wie Theologie und Philosophie Grundlagen der rechtlichen Moderne gelegt haben.
In den vergangenen Jahrzehnten ist die philosophisch-theologische Beschäftigung mit dem Recht im Mittelalter und der Frühen Neuzeit immer mehr in den Fokus der Wissenschaft gelangt. Stefan Thönissen stellt diese Zusammenhänge in einem Überblick dar und fragt, wie das Zusammenwirken von Theologie, Philosophie und Rechtswissenschaft das Recht transformieren konnte. Hierfür werden zentrale philosophisch-theologische Debatten rekonstruiert und aufgezeigt, wie diese für rechtliche Diskussionen relevant wurden. Während zunächst die Theologie verrechtlicht wird, greift später eine Rezeption der theologischen Rechtslehre in den Bereich des Rechts Platz. Diese Entwicklungen machen begreiflich, wie sich der moderne, auf Person, Wille und Freiheit basierende Rechtsbegriff Bahn brechen konnte.
Volume Editors: Stephan Dusil and Andreas Thier
The Decretum Gratiani is the cornerstone of medieval canon law, and the manuscript St Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, 673 an essential witness to its evolution. The studies in this volume focus on that manuscript, providing critical insights into its genesis, linguistic features, and use of Roman Law, while evaluating its attraction to medieval readers and modern scholars.
Together, these studies offer a fascinating view on the evolution of the Decretum Gratiani, as well as granting new insights on the complex dynamics and processes by which legal knowledge was first created and then transferred in medieval jurisprudence.
Contributors are Enrique de León, Stephan Dusil, Melodie H. Eichbauer, Atria A. Larson, Titus Lenherr, Philipp Lenz, Kenneth Pennington, Andreas Thier, José Miguel Viejo-Ximénez, John C. Wei, and Anders Winroth.
Charlene M. Eska presents in this book a critical edition and translation of a newly discovered early Irish legal text on lost and stolen property, Aidbred. Although the Old Irish text itself is fragmentary, the copious accompanying commentaries provide a wealth of legal, historical, and linguistic information, thus presenting us with a complete picture of the legal procedures involved in reclaiming missing property.
This book also includes editions of two other texts concerning property found on land, Heptad 64, and at sea, Muirbretha. The three texts edited together provide a complete picture of this aspect of the early Irish legal system.