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How did people solve their disputes over debt, compensation, inheritance and other civil matters in early China? Did they go to court? How did the authorities view those problems? Using recently excavated early Chinese legal materials, Zhang Zhaoyang makes the compelling argument that civil law was not only developed, but also acquired a certain degree of sophistication during the Qin and Han dynasties. The state promulgated detailed regulations to deal with economic and personal relationships between individuals. The authorities formed an integral part of the formal justice system, and heard civil cases on a regular basis.
In: A History of Civil Law in Early China: Cases, Statutes, Concepts and Beyond
In: A History of Civil Law in Early China: Cases, Statutes, Concepts and Beyond
In: A History of Civil Law in Early China: Cases, Statutes, Concepts and Beyond
In: A History of Civil Law in Early China: Cases, Statutes, Concepts and Beyond
In: A History of Civil Law in Early China: Cases, Statutes, Concepts and Beyond
In: A History of Civil Law in Early China: Cases, Statutes, Concepts and Beyond
In: A History of Civil Law in Early China: Cases, Statutes, Concepts and Beyond
In: A History of Civil Law in Early China: Cases, Statutes, Concepts and Beyond
Law-Making and Local Normativities in Iberian Asia, 1500-1800
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Norms beyond Empire seeks to rethink the relationship between law and empire by emphasizing the role of local normative production. While European imperialism is often viewed as being able to shape colonial law and government to its image, this volume argues that early modern empires could never monolithically control how these processes unfolded. Examining the Iberian empires in Asia, it seeks to look at norms as a means of escaping the often too narrow concept of law and look beyond empire to highlight the ways in which law-making and local normativities frequently acted beyond colonial rule. The ten chapters explore normative production from this perspective by focusing on case studies from China, India, Japan, and the Philippines.

Contributors are: Manuel Bastias Saavedra, Marya Svetlana T. Camacho, Luisa Stella de Oliveira Coutinho Silva, Rômulo da Silva Ehalt, Patricia Souza de Faria, Fupeng Li, Miguel Rodrigues Lourenço, Abisai Perez Zamarripa, Marina Torres Trimállez, and Ângela Barreto Xavier.