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Three Generations of Chinese Trotskyists in Defeat, Jail, Exile, and Diaspora
Editors / Translators: and
With an introduction by Gregor Benton.

The Longest Night tells the story of Chinese Trotskyism in its later years, including after Mao Zedong's capture of Beijing in 1949. It treats the three ages of Chinese Trotskyism: the founding generation around Chen Duxiu, Zheng Chaolin, Wang Fanxi, and Peng Shuzhi, who joined the Opposition after their expulsion from the Chinese Communist Party (CCP); the first generation of those who (after 1931) did not first pass through the ranks of the CCP before becoming Trotskyists; and those who became Trotskyists after 1949, mainly in Hong Kong and the diaspora.
Local Councils and People’s Assemblies in Korea, 1567–1894
Author:
Translator:
Eugene Y. Park’s annotated translation of a long-awaited book by Kim Ingeol introduces Anglophone readers to a path-breaking scholarship on the widening social base of political actors who shaped “public opinion” (kongnon) in early modern Korea. Initially limited to high officials, the articulators of public opinion as the state and elites recognized grew in number to include mid-level civil officials, State Confucian College students, all Confucian literati (yurim), influential commoners who took over local councils (hyanghoe), and the general population. Marshaling evidence from a wealth of documents, Kim presents a compelling case for the indigenous origins of Korean democracy.
Re-discovering Objects on the Silk Roads
Volume Editors: and
Saved by Desert Sands, edited by Kelsey Granger and Imre Galambos, unites historians, codicologists, art historians, archaeologists, and curators in the study of material culture on the Silk Roads. The re-discovery of forgotten manuscript archives and sand-buried cities in the twentieth century has brought to light thousands of manuscripts and artefacts. To date, textual content has largely been prioritised over physical objects and their materiality, but the material aspects of these objects are just as important. Focusing primarily on the material and non-textual, this volume presents studies on silver dishes, sealing systems, manuscripts, Buddhist paintings, and ceramics, all of which demonstrate the centrality of material culture in the study of the Silk Roads.
A Translation of Mayama Seika’s Genroku Chūshingura
The revenge of the 47 rōnin is the most famous vendetta in Japanese history and it continues to inspire the popular imagination today. Written between 1934 and 1941, Mayama Seika’s ten-play cycle Genroku Chūshingura is a unique retelling of the incident based on his own painstaking research into the historical facts.
Considered a modern masterpiece, it now has a secure place in the Kabuki repertoire and many of the plays are still frequently performed.
For the first time, Seika’s monumental achievement is here translated into English in its complete and original form by three experienced experts in the field.
A Revised Conception of Buddhist Spread in East Asia, 538-710
Author:
In this book, WU Hong deconstructs the prevailing theory of a 100-year Buddhist artistic lag between Asuka Japan and the Chinese mainland. She proposes to radically re-date Asuka statues, such as the famous Hōryūji Kondō Shaka Triad. The new dating opens up possibilities for revising our perceptions of early Japanese history and interchange in East Asia, while also allowing a fresh account of Asuka statuary to emerge.

Proceeding from the revised chronology and emphasizing local processes, this new account brings the growth of Asuka Buddhism into clearer vision and elaborates on heretofore unknown historical details for an enriched understanding of this critical period of East Asian history.
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In: Translocal Chinese: East Asian Perspectives
Authors: and

Abstract

The Wangkang Festival has been celebrated for nearly two centuries in Melaka, Malaysia. In 2005, it was recognized as part of the national heritage of Malaysia; and in 2020 garnered global recognition with unesco Intangible Cultural Heritage designation. The festival centers on apprehending evil spirits believed to cause epidemics and chaos, while invoking peace and prosperity. The tradition revolves around the worship of Ong Yah, also known as the “Five Sworn Brothers,” making it a vibrant cultural site to study Melaka’s local Chinese identity through Taoist folk religious practices. This article documents the 2020 festival in the midst of the covid pandemic, observes the notable absence and marginalization of women, explores gender constructions through the notion of wu (武) in Chinese masculinity, particularly through the ideal of yingxiong haohan (英雄好漢), and argues that the Chinese community carves out a Chinese public space, identity and presence in Malaysia within the Wangkang Festival context.

In: Translocal Chinese: East Asian Perspectives

Abstract

The Communist Party of Malaya (cpm) evolved under the impact of the Cold War. Considering that the cpm was a left-wing political party that had a significant impact on many areas of Malaysia, this study tries to identify and investigate the causes of the cpm’s inability to win the political fight from 1948 to 1989. Both domestic and internal party issues, along with the Cold War scenario, were a significant component that could not be neglected by the researchers.

In: Translocal Chinese: East Asian Perspectives

Abstract

Do businesses owned or operated by the Chinese diaspora engage more with China than businesses owned by non-ethnic Chinese? To answer this question, ethnic Chinese owned companies listed on the Malaysian stock exchange were compared with non-Chinese owned/controlled on the extent of their business in China. Of some 800 listed companies as of December 2017, 547 or 68% are Malaysian Chinese companies. Of the latter, some 18.4%, conduct business in China compared to just 8.5% among the non-ethnic Chinese listed companies. This finding needs to be qualified first, by the fact that the companies’ presence in China may not represent a major portion of their business. As some firms do not separate their China- from other Asian businesses, the extent of China engagement is likely to be underestimated. Second, while economic motives were responsible for their presence in China, “cultural citizenship” and family business patriarchs being first or second generations could help explain their affinity to China.

In: Translocal Chinese: East Asian Perspectives