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This book focuses, for the first time ever, on the protection roles of human rights NGOs since the establishment of the United Nations and the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It also looks at how NGOs are responding to future challenges such as artificial Intelligence, robots in armed conflicts, digital threats, and the protection of human rights in outer space. Written by leading NGO human rights practitioners from different parts of the world, it sheds light on the multiple roles of the leading pillar of the global human rights movement, the Non-Governmental Organizations.

"This is a rich and wonderful production, a great magnum opus that will continue to test the scrutiny of all times"
Professor Theo van Boven, Professor Emeritus Law, University of Maastricht, The Netherlands.
Globalisation, migration, and (de-)secularisation have fundamentally transformed the concepts of religion, state, and law during the last decades. The main goal of this interdisciplinary approach is to clarify the multifaceted theoretical and practical challenges of religious diversity and socio-political pluralism in Europe.

In twenty-two chapters, the contributions to this volume revisit basic concepts, structures and institutional settings such as sovereignty, the dogma of the separation of state, church and/or religion; human and minority rights; gender and religion; varieties of fundamentalisms, interreligious dialogue and peacebuilding and, not least, religious education.
Situating the Right to Citizenship within International and Regional Human Rights Law
The book offers a comprehensive analysis of the right to citizenship in international and regional human rights law. It critically reflects on the limitations of state sovereignty in nationality matters and situates the right to citizenship within the existing human rights framework. It identifies the scope and content of the right to citizenship by looking not only at statelessness, deprivation of citizenship or dual citizenship, but more broadly at acquisition, loss and enjoyment of citizenship in a migration context. Exploring the intersection of international migration, human rights law and belonging, the book provides a timely argument for recognizing a right to the citizenship of a specific state on the basis of one’s effective connections to that state according to the principle of jus nexi.
The Asian Yearbook of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law aims to publish peer-reviewed scholarly articles and reviews as well as significant developments in human rights and humanitarian law. It examines international human rights and humanitarian law with a global reach, though its particular focus is on the Asian region.

The focused theme of Volume 6 is Essays in Honour of Professor Shaheen Sardar Ali.
How international is international humanitarian law? The Laws of Yesterday's Wars 2: From Ancient India to East Africa, together with its companion volume, The Laws of Yesterday’s Wars: From Indigenous Australians to the American Civil War (Brill-Nijhoff, 2021), attempts to answer that question. It offers a culture-by-culture account of various unique restrictions placed on warfare over time. Containing essays by a range of laws of war academics and practitioners, it approaches the laws of yesterday’s wars from a wide cross-section of history and culture, seeking to find any common ground and to demonstrate a history of international law outside the usual confines of its ‘development’ by Europeans and its later ‘contributions.’ This volume includes studies on Japanese, Islamic and Eastern Native American rules of war.
What constitutes the core values, tenets, cultural, historic, and ideological parameters of secularism in international contexts? In twelve chapters, this edited work examines current tensions in liberal secular states where myriad rights and freedoms compete regarding education, healthcare, end-of-life choices, clothing, sexual orientation, reproduction, and minority interests. It explores the legal complexity of defining a ‘religion’ through judicial decisions and scrutinises Christianity, Hinduism and Islam’s relative success in accommodating religious pluralism.

Part One explores the religious practice and persecution nexus, COVID-19’s effect on religious freedom, religious education, burqas/headscarves, and religious culture in civil law. Part Two explores the constitutional principle of secularism in Member States of the Council of Europe, US Religious Clauses, and religious freedom in South Africa, UK, Australia, and India.
Author: Ruben Zandvliet
Are states allowed to prohibit the importation of products made by children? Can foreign investors claim compensation when their host state raises the minimum wage? In this book Ruben Zandvliet examines the ways in which international trade and investment law enables and constrains the ability of states to regulate labour. In addition to analysing the interactions between the relevant norms, it explains how linkages between international economic law and labour navigate between two notions: fair competition and fundamental rights. This study is agnostic about which of these objectives ought to shape international law, thus allowing a critical examination of the relevant rules of public international law, as well as legal and economic scholarship.
This book argues that, notwithstanding problems encountered on the ground in some situations, African governments, peoples, and institutions have firmly endorsed the universality of human rights as defined in international human rights law. It explores the endorsement of the values of human dignity, equality, respect, and democratic governance reflected by their participation in the United Nations, the African Union, and in sub-regional organizations, as well as their adoption of stunning Democracy Charters. The African Commission and Court of Human Rights have repeatedly affirmed the universality of human rights, as have spearhead institutions such as the Constitutional Court of South Africa. The volume concludes that the fifty-four African States in the United Nations stand proudly in support of universal human rights as defined in international and African human rights law.