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The series A Commentary on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, provides an article by article analysis of all substantive, organizational and procedural provisions of the CRC and its two Optional Protocols. Each volume in the series covers an article of the CRC. For every article, a comparison with related human rights provisions is made, followed by an in-depth exploration of the nature and scope of State obligations deriving from that article. Volumes are authored by experts in the topic under review. The series constitutes an essential tool for actors in the field of children’s rights, including academics, students, judges, grassroots workers, governmental, non-governmental and international officers. It was originally sponsored by the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office and is currently edited by the Child Law Department of the University of Leiden Law School.

Format
The Commentary is published as a part-work, and when completed, aims to offer the subscriber the most comprehensive, in-depth and practical reference work currently available on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.
Each chapter is produced as a separate fascicle consisting of (on average) 40 pages, and follows a clear and standard layout; fascicles are produced in paperback form, and are published and sent to subscribers on a regular basis.

This series of studies on child law and children’s rights seeks to provide timely and high-quality analyses of all issues relating to the interface of children and adolescents with their surrounding societies. The focus is on legal research results, but multi-disciplinary child-right-related studies also have an obvious place in the series. The diversity of contributions will be maintained by including scholarly works by academics and scholars from all geographical areas.

Abstract

Animated movies guide children, help them recognise issues and adopt positive behaviours. How do animated movies convey messages about children’s rights and their violations? We conducted an inductive content analysis of 23 animated movies for children to answer this question. The movies were analysed regarding gender balance, self-awareness representations of children’s rights, children’s rights made visible and representations of violations of children’s rights. The results show that the movies focus on relationships and individual development. The movies also convey messages about the right to dream, play, have fun and grow up in a peaceful family environment. On the other hand, the movies convey messages about violating the prohibition of discrimination against the right to gender equality. The movies associate girls with housework and marriage while portraying boys as powerful villains. In addition, the movies contain some messages that violate the right to grow up in a peaceful family environment and be protected from mistreatment, neglect and abuse. The young protagonists in the movies generally do not have families. Those with families generally have only a mother or a father. Children with parents also have negative behaviours, such as substance abuse, violence and making money off of children.

In: The International Journal of Children's Rights
Author:

Abstract

This paper explores how children’s rights are operationalised in practice, specifically by Canadian child and youth advocate offices (all 12 offices across Canada), international children’s commissioners’ offices (in Northern Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, Belgium, Norway and Denmark), and their institutional structures. A total of 24 participants took part in the study, including 12 current child and youth advocates from the Canadian Council of Child and Youth Advocates (cccya), two former advocates from the cccya, three additional staff members of the cccya (collectively, representing all 12 jurisdictions across Canada), one children’s commissioner and six designates on behalf of various international children’s commissioners. This paper shifts the research focus of children’s rights and childhood studies from the narrow confines of the individual child to a focus on the broader relational and interdependent aspects inherent within institutions that protect and promote children’s rights.

In: The International Journal of Children's Rights

Abstract

This study examined children’s knowledge of child rights, reasons why children’s opinions should be sought or not on matters affecting them, and predictors of children’s knowledge of child rights. A convergent parallel mixed method was used to study children aged 8 to 17. The quantitative data was analysed using spss version 26, while the qualitative data was analysed thematically. The study found that 32.7 per cent knew children have rights. Children being able to form their views on matters and children’s views being perceived as essential in decision making emerged as reasons children need to be consulted during decision making, while children having no responsibility emerged as a reason children should not be consulted. Furthermore, children’s socio-demographic characteristics and access to the internet and information and communication technology devices were significant predictors of children knowing about child rights. These factors should be targeted when designing interventions to promote child rights in Ghana.

In: The International Journal of Children's Rights
In: The International Journal of Children's Rights

Abstract

The development of juvenile transfer laws, against the backdrop of significant public outrage against a perceived increase in juvenile crime, has generated multiple debates, mostly centred on issues of child-inclusive justice versus crime mitigation and public safety agendas. The resulting legal developments have sought to instrumentalise punitive justice approaches, that facilitate the criminalisation of a sub-group of children (based on age and severity of crime), by articulating a limited and exclusionary conception of vulnerability. To bridge this gap, this article comprehensively evaluates the core assumptions of the juvenile transfer laws in India, through transdisciplinary considerations that integrate legal, rights-based and mental health perspectives, thereby making the analysis relevant to other legal jurisdictions with provisions for juvenile transfer. Alternative approaches to transfer, that adopt a rehabilitative and capacity-based justice orientation to culpability are discussed, to suggest crime prevention approaches cognizant of adolescent psychosocial vulnerabilities, and the need for mitigation of criminality.

In: The International Journal of Children's Rights
Author:

Abstract

This study explores how parents’ understanding of childhood shapes their awareness and support for children’s participation in family decision-making in Akropong Akuapem, Ghana. Adopting the interpretivist paradigm, a qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews with 43 parents conveniently sampled revealed three key themes: dependency; identity formation; and empowerment. Understanding childhood as a period of dependence, parents acknowledge their role as duty-bearers towards their children who are right-holders. Childhood’s role in shaping identity highlights the strong bond between children, families and the community, notably through naming ceremonies and puberty rites. Additionally, considering childhood as an empowering system emphasises children’s active contributions to their development. The study advocates for nurturing childhood as a period of empowerment, facilitating active children’s participation in family decisions concerning them whilst upholding rich cultural values. These insights have practical implications for Ghanaian culture and human rights.

In: The International Journal of Children's Rights
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In: The International Journal of Children's Rights

Abstract

For children to exercise their right to be heard when parents divorce or separate, they must voice their opinions at a time potentially characterised by significant interparental conflict. This study investigates whether several dimensions of interparental conflict are associated with whether children had expressed their opinions on post-divorce life to their parents and/or friends. Children aged 7-15 (N = 472) and their parents were recruited to the Dynamics of Family Conflict Study (fam-c) from Norwegian family counselling centres. Parents reported on levels of physical and verbal aggression, child involvement, cooperation and resolution of conflicts. Bayesian multilevel logistic regression indicated that verbal aggression was associated with a decreased, and triangulation with an increased, tendency for children to have expressed their views to their parents. No reliable associations were found with regards to friends. Our results underscore the importance for mediation services to continue to support children in expressing their views.

In: The International Journal of Children's Rights