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This peer-reviewed book series offers an international forum for high-quality scholarly studies on the indigenous languages of South, Central and North America, including the Arctic. Around 1,000 genealogically and typologically very diverse languages are spoken in this immense region. Due to ecological and cultural pressure this treasure trove of languages is often highly endangered with extinction, hence the urgency of its preservation and study. The publications in this series will concern both descriptive and analytical work on American indigenous languages, and include handbooks, language surveys, grammatical descriptions and theoretical, historical, areal and typological monographs or particularly well-organized edited volumes with a central theme. Even though the scope of the series is international, authors are encouraged to write in English to reach as large as possible a readership.

In: Siouan Languages and Linguistics
In: Siouan Languages and Linguistics
In: Siouan Languages and Linguistics

Abstract

The Siouan languages, and especially the Dhegiha subgroup of Mississippi Valley Siouan, are particularly rich in the use of positionals in classificatory constructions. This paper briefly summarizes the grammaticalization trajectory of the verb roots ‘sit, stand, lie’, expanding on Rankin (1977) and leading up to a discussion of a recent convergence of positional and evidential categories in the five Dhegiha Siouan languages. Within Dhegiha morphosyntax positional verbs have yielded: deictic classifiers; locative classifiers; interrogative classifiers, new sets of aspectual auxiliaries and new causative verbs of placing, all using the definite articles as roots. In Omaha, Ponca and Quapaw, homophony has caused reanalysis of an evidential particle as a positional article, giving rise to the use of certain of the positional articles as evidential classifiers and even evidential verb stems.

In: Siouan Languages and Linguistics
In: Siouan Languages and Linguistics

Abstract

The Kaw Nation is closely linked through its language to the Omaha, Ponca, Osage and Quapaw tribes, as well as, more distantly, to the Ioways, Otoes, Dakota Sioux and others. Clan names, place names and terms for the crops they grew link them to areas in the Ohio Valley and the American Southeast in the period before they moved up the Missouri Valley to present-day Kansas.

In: Siouan Languages and Linguistics
In: Siouan Languages and Linguistics
In: Siouan Languages and Linguistics