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In A Christian-Muslim Comparative Theology of Saints: The Community of God’s Friends, Hans A. Harmakaputra focuses on a question that emerges from today’s multi-faith context: “Is it possible for Christians to recognize non-Christians as saints?” To answer affirmatively, he offers a Christian perspective on an inclusive theology of saints through the lens of comparative theology that is based on the thought of Catholic, Protestant, and Muslim theologians: Karl Rahner, Jean-Luc Marion, Elizabeth Johnson, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Paul Tillich, and Ibn Arabī’. As a result of this interreligious comparison, three theological constructs emerge: (1) saints as manifestations and revealers of God’s self-communication, (2) the hiddenness of saints, and (3) saints as companions.
These theological constructs redefine and reconfigure Christian understanding of saints on one hand, and on the other hand provide theological reasoning to include non-Christians in the Christian notion of the communion of saints.
This volume presents the reader with a fascinating collection of hymns composed by El‘azar the Babylonian, an Arab-Jewish poet who is active in Baghdad during the first half of the 13th century. His religious oeuvre consists of dozens of hymns, coming down to us from the treasures of the Cairo Genizah and the Firkovicz Collections. His compositions provide a cross-section of genres and liturgical destinations. El‘azar’s devotional hymnology is characterised by a striking spiritual tendency which reveals his familiarity with contemporary Sufism in both Muslim and Jewish circles.
Author: Jari Kaukua
In Suhrawardī’s Illuminationism, Jari Kaukua offers a new interpretation of Shihāb al-Dīn al-Suhrawardī’s (d. 1191 CE) illuminationist (ishrāqī) philosophy. Commonly portrayed as a philosophically inclined mystic, Suhrawardī appears here as a perspicacious critic of Avicenna who developed his critique into an alternative philosophical system.
Focusing on metaphysics and theory of science, Kaukua argues that Suhrawardī’s illuminationist philosophy combines rigorous metaphysical monism with a modest but positive assessment of scientific explanation. This philosophical core of Suhrawardī’s illuminationism is reconcilable with but independent of the mystical side of the shaykh al-ishrāq.
The Handbook of Sufi Studies (HSUF) series is a new sub series of the renowned Handbook of Oriental Studies. Section 1 The Near and Middle East. It serves as the principal reference tool for the field of Sufi studies and an essential forum for theoretically and methodologically sophisticated discussions of the major themes and research methods related to this field.

The goal of HSUF is not just to describe and summarize the findings of the previous scholarship on Sufism but also to engage critically with it and to offer new ways to approach it. Special attention is paid to the applicability to Sufi studies of methodological tools developed by sociology, cultural anthropology, subaltern and gender studies, religious studies, literary theory and discourse analysis.

Each volume of the series consists of a general introduction by the editor(s) followed by several general analytic essays on the topics at hand. Each analytical essay, in its turn, introduces several sub-chapters focusing on a particular issue within the overall thematic scope of the chapter. Written by major experts on Sufism, the Handbook of Sufi Studies (HSUF) series is meant to be a standard reference for both specialists in Islamic and religious studies and non-specialists interested in a balanced and academically rigorous discussion of Sufism.
Studies on Sufism provides a forum for original scholarship on Sufism as situated within all of its temporal, geographical, linguistic, cultural and intellectual contexts. The series is open to all disciplinary perspectives and relevant topics of inquiry and publishes monographic studies, edited volumes, and critical editions and translations of texts. Contributions are welcome in English, French or German.
This book discusses hagiographical sources from Morocco taking in consideration the often-overlooked oral tradition. Orality, as is shown in this study, completes and enriches the vision of hagiography that written sources traditionally has offered. The most relevant example in this book is the high presence of female saints in oral narratives that were not included in any other written sources. Recovering oral tradition to study hagiography as well as the role of female saints in Morocco has been one of the main areas of focus in this study as well as problematizing the dependence and dialogue between written and oral culture and can help to understand the diffusion and presence of similar phenomena in other areas of Morocco.
Author: Tahera Aftab
In Sufi Women of South Asia. Veiled Friends of God, the first biographical compendium of hundred and forty-one women, from the eleventh to the twentieth century, Tahera Aftab fills a serious gap in the existing scholarship regarding the historical presence of women in Islam and brings women to the centre of the expanding literature on Sufism. The book’s translated excerpts from the original Farsi and Urdu sources that were never put together create a much-needed English-language source base on Sufism and Muslim women. The book questions the spurious religious and cultural traditions that patronise gender inequalities in Muslim societies and convincingly proves that these pious women were exemplars of Islamic piety who as true spiritual masters avoided its public display.
In: Memory and Presence of Female Saints in Ksar El Kebir (Morocco)
In: Memory and Presence of Female Saints in Ksar El Kebir (Morocco)
In: Memory and Presence of Female Saints in Ksar El Kebir (Morocco)