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How can medieval art explain Jerusalem’s centrality in the world faiths of Christianity and Islam? This book delves into that topic by examining how Jerusalem was creatively represented and reimagined in several intriguing Christian and Islamic artworks in the later Middle Ages (c. 1187 to 1356).
The book considers how European Catholic crusaders, Eastern Christian sects, and diverse Muslim factions displayed Jerusalem’s architecture to express their interpretation of the holy city’s sanctity and influence. These examples demonstrate how artworks can reflect Jerusalem’s importance to these faiths in the past and illuminate our understanding of its status into the modern era.
[Ancient Architecture in Syria: Djebel Simʿân]
Editor / Translator: Aisha Muhammed Ali Moussa
يستعرض كتاب العمارة القديمة في سوريا (جبل سمعان)، من تأليف هوارد كروسبي باتلر وترجمة عائشة موسى، 24 موقعًا أثريًا في شمال سوريا. ويُسلِّط كل موقعٍ منها الضوء على اكتشافات جديدة تقف شاهدةً على عظمة الحضارات التي امتزجت بين جنباتها، مخلفةً وراءها إرثًا سرمديًا لا ينسى.
وتأتي قلعة القديس سمعان العمودي في طليعة هذه المواقع وتعد أكثرها شهرة، وبقيت في صدارة العمارة الكاتدرائية حتى بناء آيا صوفيا، كما بشَّرت بالتطور العمراني الديني اللاحق في كل من القسطنطينية وأوروبا.
وثمة مخططات ومقاطع عرضية وصور توضح جميع هذه المعالم، وتعمل على توثيق أبنيتها وتفاصيلها وتخليد هذا الكنز الذي لا يقدَّر بثمن للأجيال القادمة.
The Ancient Architecture in Syria (Djebel Simʿân), written by Howard C. Butler and translated by Aisha Moussa, covers 24 ancient sites in Northern Syria. Each site sparks new revelations about the great civilizations mingled there, leaving behind an unforgettable, everlasting legacy.
The first and most notable site is the citadel of St Simeon Stylets, which was not surpassed by any cathedral till Hagia Sophia and heralded the subsequent religious architectural development in Constantinople and Europe.
Each monument is illustrated by plans, cross-sections and photographs documenting its structure and details and preserving this invaluable treasure for endless generations to come.
Public Porticoes, Small Baths, Shops/Workshops, and ‘Middle Class’ Houses in the East Mediterranean
Author: Solinda Kamani
This book examines neglected architectural decoration from the late antique city of the East Mediterranean. It addresses the omission in scholarship of discussion about the embellishment of non-monumental secular buildings (public porticoes, small public baths, shops/workshops, and non-elite houses). The finishing of these structures has been overlooked at the expense of more lofty buildings and remains one of the least known aspects of the late antique city.
The book surveys the archaeological evidence for decoration in the region, with the maritime sites of Ostia and Ephesus selected as case studies. Drawing upon archaeological, written, and visual sources, it attempts to reconstruct how such buildings appeared to late antique viewers and investigates why they were decorated as they were.
This book is the first comprehensive synthesis on mosques in sub-Saharan Africa, bringing together sites from more than twenty states from sub-Saharan Africa; and more than 285 monuments, from the IXth to the XIXth centuries. This monograph is divided into three large geographical areas, from the earthen mosques of West Africa, to the Nile Valleys and the Horn of Africa, and to the Indian Ocean shores and Swahili coral stone mosques. This book is a statement that African mosques demonstrate cultural links with North Africa, Arabia, Persia and India, these monuments are unique in the history of Islamic architecture, and they belong to our World Heritage.
Volume Editors: Jens Scheiner and Isabel Toral
Baghdād: From its Beginnings to the 14th Century offers an exhaustive handbook that covers all possible themes connected to the history of this urban complex in Iraq, from its origins rooted in late antique Mesopotamia up to the aftermath of the Mongol invasion in 1258.
Against the common perception of a city founded 762 in a vacuum, which, after experiencing a heyday in a mythical “golden age” under the early ʿAbbāsids, entered since 900 a long period of decline that ended with a complete collapse by savage people from the East in 1258, the volume emphasizes the continuity of Baghdād’s urban life, and shows how it was marked by its destiny as caliphal seat and cultural hub.

Contributors
Mehmetcan Akpınar, Nuha Alshaar, Pavel Basharin, David Bennett, Michal Biran, Richard W. Bulliet, Kirill Dmitriev, Desmond Durkin-Meisterernst, Hend Gilli-Elewy, Beatrice Gruendler, Sebastian Günther, Olof Heilo, Damien Janos, Christopher Melchert, Michael Morony, Bernard O’Kane, Klaus Oschema, Letizia Osti, Parvaneh Pourshariati, Vanessa van Renterghem, Jens Scheiner, Angela Schottenhammer, Y. Zvi Stampfer, Johannes Thomann, Isabel Toral.
Construction Processes and Transmission of Knowledge from Late Antiquity to Early Islam
Volume Editor: Piero Gilento
This edited volume examines the construction processes and the mechanisms of transmission of knowledge between the eastern and western Mediterranean lands from the late Roman period to the early centuries of Islam. The essays explore issues of material culture, craft techniques, technological and typological changes and cultural contacts in Syria, Jordan, North Africa and Spain. The volume includes case studies on prestigious architectural complexes, defensive systems and other structures located in major urban centres (Cyrrhus, Bosra, Jerash, Sousse, Kairouan and Cordoba), as well as minor sites and rural buildings. It offers a fresh contribution to the long-lasting historiographic debate on the transition from antiquity to the Middle Ages and how Early Islamic architecture fostered the structural assumptions for new building experiences in many Mediterranean regions.

Contributors: Antonio Almagro, Shaker Al Shbib, Stefano Anastasio, Ignacio Arce, Jean-Claude Bessac, Pascale Clauss-Balty, Piero Gilento, Mattia Guidetti, Pedro Gurriarán Daza, Roberto Parenti, Pauline Piraud-Fournet, María de los Ángeles Utrero Agudo, Jean-Pierre van Staëvel, Apolline Vernet, François Villeneuve.
Studies in Visual Cultures and Artistic Transfers from Late Antiquity to the Modern Period
Mediterranean Art Histories (MAH) offers a platform in the emerging field of Mediterranean studies which enhances the dialogue between Byzantine, Islamic, Jewish and Western art history and archaeology. In contrast to the claim for a global art history based on comparative models, the study of the Mediterranean iconosphere is primarily concerned with the connectivity of cultures, seen in a permanent process of transformation. By focusing on networks and liquid spaces, the series understands the Mediterranean as a model and test case for trans-regional research, transcending geographical boundaries. Among the topics which could be addressed by MAH are multi-ethnic and multi-religious hubs; the migration of people and artifacts, the role of collecting, uses of spolia and attitudes towards the past; the construction of centers; the visual transmission and construction of knowledge. MAH is particularly interested in studies which investigate the historical dynamics of contact zones (harbor cities; shared and contested religious topographies etc.); all forms of artistic exchange and interaction within the Mediterranean as well as with other areas; the formation and transformation of aesthetic languages; the dynamics of ornaments and the concepts of images; the agency of artifacts in religious, political, social and economic contexts. The series wishes to include works which investigate the historical conceptualization of the Mediterranean space (for example in cartography) and of the distinction of nature and culture. And finally, MAH welcomes monographs and collective works which address methodological and historiographical concerns which could also regard the musealization of the Mediterranean. If you are working on a book that would be suitable for this series, please do not hesitate to contact BRILL Editor Teddi Dols (Dols@brill.com).

Editor: Alina Payne
The Land Between Two Seas: Art on the Move in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea 1300-1700 focuses on the strong riverine ties that connect the seas of the Mediterranean system (from the Western Mediterranean through the Sea of Marmara, the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov) and their hinterland. Addressing the mediating role of the Balkans between East and West all the way to Poland and Lithuania, as well as this region’s contribution to the larger Mediterranean artistic and cultural melting pot, this innovative volume explores ideas, artworks and stories that moved through these territories linking the cultures of Central Asia with those of western Europe.
In: The Land between Two Seas: Art on the Move in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea 1300–1700