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In: Eurasian Studies
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In: Eurasian Studies
Author: Irene Cazzato

Abstract

The present article builds on the studies previously conducted on the Kesik Baş, one of the first mes̱nevī written in Old Anatolian Turkish that spread in Asia Minor during its Middle Age. After having outlined the possible antecedents of this literary tradition, a brief commentary on the account will be offered. A transcription of the text as it is preserved in the ms. 06 Hk 3953/1 kept in the Ankara Adnan Ötüken İl Halk Kütüphanesi’s collection of the National Library will then be presented.

In: Eurasian Studies
In: Eurasian Studies
Author: Çiğdem Oğuz

Abstract

This article addresses public opinion and propaganda during the Italo-Turkish War of 1911 in the Ottoman Empire and Italy in a comparative perspective through visual and textual materials. An examination of major themes and channels of war propaganda in both countries shows how such propaganda often developed in response to that of the adversary. A study of the two cases together also gives us a better understanding of how and why medieval hostilities between the two cultures were brought forward for the purposes of propaganda. The article draws attention to the global socio-political context of the war, the role of international law, and specific domestic dynamics of the belligerent countries and investigates the reasons for the participation of a wider public in the war debate.

In: Eurasian Studies

Abstract

Arabic pseudo-inscriptions from twelfth and thirteenth-century Basilicata and Apulia are still underrated, though they issued from a unique cultural milieu where the Islamic, Byzantine, and western influences combined creating a peculiar visual expression. Still open issues concern the models, prototypes, and channels of transmission that brought pseudo-epigraphic motifs to south-eastern Italy and the relation intercurrent between Christian themes and Arabic scripts. To answer these questions and assess conclusively whether Byzantium acted as the main intermediary, a new research approach proposes to start from the palaeographic analysis of pseudo-inscriptions to put them in the framework of the coeval Islamic epigraphy.

In: Eurasian Studies
In: Eurasian Studies