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If you want to better understand not only international but also social diplomacy, then this book is for you. If you are a practitioner in traditional diplomacy or a person who want to apply diplomatic ideas and methods in social life, you can find many useful insights in this original work. A scholar and experienced diplomat, the author argues that international and social diplomacy can learn from each other. He explores genuine diplomacy as a goodwill mission, constructive engagement, and dialogical interaction that can help states, non-state organizations, companies, groups, individuals, and their aggregations to create public goods and make positive social changes.
Author: Ruben Zandvliet
Are states allowed to prohibit the importation of products made by children? Can foreign investors claim compensation when their host state raises the minimum wage? In this book Ruben Zandvliet examines the ways in which international trade and investment law enables and constrains the ability of states to regulate labour. In addition to analysing the interactions between the relevant norms, it explains how linkages between international economic law and labour navigate between two notions: fair competition and fundamental rights. This study is agnostic about which of these objectives ought to shape international law, thus allowing a critical examination of the relevant rules of public international law, as well as legal and economic scholarship.
Free access
In: International Organizations Law Review

Abstract

The International Health Regulations (ihr) have been severely tested by the covid-19 pandemic. Recent reviews have identified a number of gaps and challenges and proposed improvement, but the Regulations should be analysed in their context as a constitutional instrument deeply embedded in who’s governance to better understand their systemic strengths and weaknesses. The ihr embody a managerial model of health governance that aims at depoliticizing international response to health emergencies and coordinating it on the basis of expertise and persuasion. The political crisis accompanying the covid-19 pandemic, however, reveals the need for a different and more political approach that injects states in the governance of the ihr following models tested by other international agreements. It also highlights the need for a more effective framework of cooperation and coordination that builds upon who’s practice of inter-institutional cooperation but complements it through institutional consultation structures involving directly states parties.

In: International Organizations Law Review

Abstract

International dispute resolution not only aims to redress wrongdoings, but also to deter states from violating obligations. Approaching the International Health Regulations (ihr) from this viewpoint and using recent global health crises as examples, this paper argues that dispute resolution must be strengthened in the ihr in order to protect global health security. While a diverse range of dispute resolution mechanisms exist in other legal regimes, this paper proposes that a three-pronged architecture consisting of a guidance mechanism, formal adjudicative mechanism, and recourse to the icj and binding arbitration would provide for the most efficient and timely response to a dispute between states parties. Importantly, this architecture can be used both prior to and during a global health crisis, and could incentivize states parties towards solidarity in the global public health response.

Open Access
In: International Organizations Law Review

Abstract

The covid-19 pandemic and other major public health emergencies of international concern occurred in the last 20 years remind us of the close interconnections between human, animal, and environmental health and the need for collaborative and multisectoral approaches to address complex health threats. These outbreaks also serve to highlight the importance of timely sharing of pathogens, which are used to characterise the causative agent of an outbreak, understand its spread, and develop diagnostics, antiviral treatments, and vaccines. Despite their relevance to preparedness and response, neither One Health nor pathogen sharing are grounded within the International Health Regulations (ihr). This paper analyses the existing institutional and normative gaps within the ihr, including examining how other regimes within the international legal landscape have sought to ‘fill the gaps’. We explore possible solutions and make proposals to strengthen interinstitutional cooperation and coordination through mechanisms alternative to ihr reform or a global pandemic treaty.

In: International Organizations Law Review
Author: Alex J. Bellamy

Abstract

This piece examines the place of the use of force in R2P. It shows that a sceptical view about the use of force to protect populations, a view guided by the seemingly ‘endless wars’ of the global ‘war on terror’ and the troubled legacy of intervention in Libya, has become predominant. The principle’s earliest advocates went to considerable lengths to distinguish it from the bad old days of ‘humanitarian intervention’ in part to assuage fears and in part to burnish R2P’s apparent novelty. However, experience shows that in the face of determined perpetrators force, with all the problems that entails, sometimes is necessary to protect from populations. This piece suggests the need to bring the use of force back in to debates about implementing R2P

Open Access
In: Global Responsibility to Protect