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‘This is the essential book today for understanding maritime security law” -Prof. James Kraska (US Naval War College & Harvard Law School)

The recrudescence of great power competition at sea raises several legal problems. Maritime Security Law in Hybrid Warfare brings together authors from various fields of international law to address such challenges in the legal intersection between naval war, military activities, maritime law enforcement, and hybrid warfare. This book explores the means for increasing legal resilience against the emerging trend of weaponization of commercial ships, underwater cables and pipelines, lawfare, and migration by hybrid adversaries.
This policy-oriented jurisprudence presents the latest research findings on legal challenges faced by the international regulatory framework, as posed by the increasing deployment of uncrewed vessels at sea. It is the first publication that offers discussions and opinions reflecting a combined international and comparative (especially, eastern) perspective. The contributors from multiple jurisdictions elaborate on legal implications of the use of uncrewed vessels for military, commercial, scientific-research, and law-enforcement purposes from such diverse angles as the law of the sea, international humanitarian law, the law of war, global shipping regulation, marine environment protection, cybersecurity, and artificial intelligence and law.
Before the invention of synthetic sponges, divers culled the seabeds of the Aegean for animal sponges or "sea gold" to supply global demand, while risking paralysis or death from decompression disease. This is a study of sponge diving and the impact of the industry on the inhabitants of Kalymnos and Mediterranean. It is a record of the 10,000 divers who died, the 20,000 who were paralysed between 1886 and 1910, and the women who were there to sustain them when they returned home.
Devoted to assessing the state of ocean and coastal governance, knowledge, and management, the Ocean Yearbook provides information in one convenient resource.

As in previous editions, articles provide multidisciplinary expert perspectives on contemporary issues. Each new volume draws on policy studies, international relations, international and comparative law, management, marine sciences, economics, and social sciences. Each volume contains key recent legal and policy instruments.

The Yearbook is a collaborative initiative of the International Ocean Institute (www.ioinst.org) in Malta and the Marine & Environmental Law Institute (www.dal.ca/law/MELAW) at the Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada.
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Abstract

Together with its mineral resources, ‘the Area’ – comprising the seabed and subsoil beyond the boundaries of national jurisdiction – is designated as the ‘common heritage of mankind’. One of the predominant motivations behind the principle of the common heritage of mankind was to ensure fair sharing of the benefits derived from the Area by preventing a first-come first-serve race to the bottom of the ocean, which would mainly entitle developed nations – possessing the necessary expertise, technology and financial means to engage in deep sea mining – to the mineral resources of the deep seabed and would exclude most developing States from these economic opportunities. This important objective ought to be effected through a number of measures, but most of these measures have not yet been implemented by the International Seabed Authority or seem to be undermined by current developments.

In: The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law

Abstract

This article examines how the existing legal landscape on marine pollution may accommodate a new treaty on plastics pollution, potential legal bottlenecks, and what this tells us about the ‘plasticity’ of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (LOSC) vis-à-vis new rules. It explores how such a new treaty may set the threshold for regulatory action by States in their implementation of the source-specific pollution provisions of the LOSC and the added complexity this may cause. It also considers that whilst the implementation of key LOSC marine environmental pollution obligations is subject to a degree of differentiation, a matching duty to assist certain States in fulfilling their responsibilities is currently lacking. Whilst the LOSC remains relevant today in the fight against marine plastics pollution, the plastics treaty under discussion can supplement and enhance the existing regime.

In: The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law
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Abstract

Over the course of more than twenty years of operation, the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf (CLCS) has made 40 recommendations to submitting coastal States regarding the outer limits of the continental shelf. Only 12 of these recommendations have been used to establish final and binding limits so far. The past practice of the CLCS demonstrates that not all coastal State submissions are simply accepted and that, in fact, various disagreements arise throughout the process. Based on a review of all recommendations issued by the CLCS, this article presents an overview of the various issues subject to disagreement between the CLCS and the submitting coastal State, discusses potential options and solutions for resolving these disagreements, and analyses those disagreements and the practice of the CLCS in light of the resilience of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.

Open Access
In: The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law