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Thirty years after the fall of Soviet power, we are beginning to understand that the experience of Muslims in the USSR continued patterns of adaptation and negotiation known from Muslim history in the lands that became the Soviet Union, and in other regions as well; we can also now understand that the long history of Muslims situating religious authority locally, in the various regions that came under Soviet rule, in fact continued through the Soviet era into post-Soviet times.
The present volume is intended to historicize the question of religious authority in Muslim Central Eurasia, through historical and anthropological case studies about the exercise, negotiation, or institutionalization of authority, from the nineteenth to the early twenty-first century; it thus seeks to frame Islamic religious history in the areas shaped by Russian and Soviet rule in terms of issues relevant to Muslims themselves, as Muslims, rather than solely in terms of questions of colonial rule.

Contributors are Sergei Abashin, Ulfat Abdurasulov, Bakhtiyar Babajanov, Devin DeWeese, Allen J. Frank, Benjamin Gatling, Agnès Kefeli, Paolo Sartori, Wendell Schwab, Pavel Shabley, Shamil Shikhaliev, and William A. Wood.
In The Eastern Christian Tradition in Modern Russian Thought and Beyond, Teresa Obolevitch reflects on the ontology and anthropology of neo-patristic synthesis and its connection to Western philosophy, with a focus on the work of Georges Florovsky and Vladimir Lossky. The book also examines the concept of apophaticism in Russian philosophy: in neo-patristic synthesis and the thought of Semyon Frank and Lev Karsavin, as well as in epistemological and cosmological comparison with process theology. Additionally, Obolevitch’s work undertakes a comparative analysis of the reception of Russian sophiology in the West, especially in the work of Thomas Merton, and also considers similarities between neo-patristic synthesis and Zen Buddhism in the thought of Merton and Sergey Horujy.
Author: Ivana Noble
In this volume of Essays in Ecumenical Theology Ivana Noble engages in conversations with Orthodox theologians and spiritual writers on diverse themes. These include the discovery of the human heart, what illumination by divine light means, the relationship between prayer and attitudes and acts of social solidarity, the problematic nature of sacrificial thinking as the way to express redemption through Christ, the ecological dimension of theological anthropology, the need for freedom to coexist with love for others and why institutions need to turn not only to their own traditions but also to the Spirit that blows where it wills.
In: Essays in Ecumenical Theology 2
In: Essays in Ecumenical Theology 2
In: Essays in Ecumenical Theology 2
In: Essays in Ecumenical Theology 2
In: Essays in Ecumenical Theology 2
In: Essays in Ecumenical Theology 2
In: Essays in Ecumenical Theology 2